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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Prevent Concrete Bughole Surface Void Formation

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 17, 2019 12:20:14 PM

Using concrete as an architectural material has brought the quality in surface appearance to an important consideration.

One of the problems affecting the surface aesthetics of concrete are bugholes. Bugholes are surface voids from the migration of mostly entrapped air to the fresh concrete form surface, mostly in the vertical plane.

preventing_bug_holes

Photo from Precast Inc. Magazine's May/June 2014 issue.


During setting, the shrinkage of the concrete forces entrapped air voids and excess water out of the mix. Water migrates upward due to density and becomes bleed water. The air bubbles seek pressure equilibrium and when in a vertical form, that's to the interior surface. These bubbles need to be directed vertically to the surface of the concrete form. Bugholes are found in the upper portion of the concrete structure or at angled form surfaces as a result of accumulation of escaping air along the height of the structure. They are primarily an aesthetic problem for exposed surfaces.

Causes

The biggest cause of bugholes is improper vibration. Consolidation through vibration, sets the bubbles into motion and sends both entrapped air and excess water to the surface.

Bughole formation can also be caused by the form material and the type of form release used.

When a chemically reactive form release agent is used, a nonviolent chemical reaction takes place when fatty acids react with free lime on the surface of fresh concrete. This reaction results in the formation of a metallic soap, a slippery material that allows air bubbles to rise along the vertical surface. This “soapy” film also prevents the hardened concrete from adhering to the forms during stripping.

Thicker coatings on forms are typical of the older barrier-type materials, like heavyweight used motor oil, vegetable oils, diesel fuel and kerosene. Barrier type release agents are less expensive than chemically reactive agents, but they are not generally recommended for reducing SCC bug holes."

Mix design can also contribute to bughole formation. A sticky or stiff mixture that is hard to consolidate can increase surface void formation.

Reduce Bugholes

Solutions

The vibrator should penetrate the previous lift and work the entrapped air towards the form and then up the sides. More vibration is necessary with impermeable forms, to move the air voids to the free surface of the concrete.

Flowing mixtures reduce bughole formation. Concrete that limits excessive fine aggregate, has the proper cement content, and uses admixture for increased flow contributes to bughole reduction. Self-consolidating concrete is becoming increasing popular for precast to improve surface quality.

Bugholes are not detrimental to structural concrete. But, with the increased use of concrete in finished construction, surface quality is important. Through careful selection of materials, quality workmanship, and dutiful supervision, surface voids can be minimized.

Learn more, "Concrete Bug Hole Prevention"

Causes & Fixes for SCC Bug Holes


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Institute, Concrete Bugholes, Bug Hole

"Form Release Agents," Technical Q&A from the American Concrete Institute Review

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 11, 2019 5:05:58 PM

ACI committees, membership, and staff have answered common questions on a variety of concrete related topics

Form release agents

Q. I need to select a form release agent for a new project requiring an architectural finish. Can you provide information on different types of form release agents and recommendations for using them? Does ACI have a publication on form release agents I could use as a reference?

American Concrete Association Form Release


A. Form release agents ease formwork removal, extending the useful life of a form and improving the smoothness and texture of concrete surfaces. Two main types are available: barrier and chemically active.

Barrier-type agents (examples include diesel oil, wax, and silicone) create a barrier between the form and the concrete. These are not recommended for architectural concrete, because they can cause stains, surface air voids, and problems with form removal in very cold or very hot weather; they also may prevent subsequent adhesion of coatings to the hardened concrete. While diesel oil was once commonly used, it’s now prohibited because the associated volatile organic content (VOC) emissions contribute to smog. (Note: In the United States, form release agents have to meet federal VOC limits of 450 g/L [3.8 lb/gal.] and may have to meet more restrictive limits of 250 g/L [2.2 lb/gal.] in some states.)

Chemically active form release agents (certain types of fatty acids) react with calcium ions in the cement paste to produce a soap that prevents concrete from bonding to the formwork. Based on the reactivity, they are divided into buffered (partially) reactive and fully reactive. Buffered agents produce an improved soap film that helps remove entrapped air and may promote better flow of a thin skin of cement paste at the surface of the form. Fully reactive agents can provide a good basic soap film that, depending on the brand, works well in most cases. Because chemically active form release agents produce fewer bugholes, stains, and surface irregularities than barrier type of form release agents, they are commonly used for architectural concrete.

For more information on this topic refer to ACI 347R “Guide to Formwork for Concrete”, ACI 303R “303R-12 Guide to Cast-in-Place Architectural Concrete Practice”, and ACI 533R “Guide for Precast Concrete Wall Panels”.

References: ACI 347R-14; ACI 303R-12; ACI 533R-11


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Institute

What is concrete release agent form oil made of?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 3, 2019 1:56:40 PM

There are three types of concrete release agents. They are very different in their cost, use and composition.

Concrete form release agents prevent the adhesion of concrete to the forming surface, usually plywood, steel or aluminum. In this application, there are three types of release agents available: barrier, reactive and water based.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 2 copy

"The thinner the better," is the best application motto for concrete form releases.


• Barrier oil based release agents develop a physical film between the form and the concrete.

• Reactive release agents are chemically active and work by the process of a chemical reaction between the release agent and the free limes available in concrete. A soapy film is created which prevents adhesion. There is generally little to no residue or unreacted product left on the forming surface or concrete which provides for a cleaner release.

• Water-based release agents are a result of more focus on health, environment and safety issues. This has resulted in the development of new technologies primarily focused on water-based formulations, with the movement being away from petroleum-based products.

Learn more by reading Bob Waterloo's article, "How Safe (and Legal) is Your Concrete Form Release Agent?" Which ran in PRECAST INC Magazine. Bob Waterloo is the distribution manager, the Hill and Griffith Company. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo (at) hillandgriffith.com.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, concrete release removal

Do I need to remove concrete form release from rebar?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 28, 2018 4:40:27 PM

No. A common misunderstanding in the concrete industry is clarified in this review of an article from ForConstructionPros.com.

Question: On several of our most recent projects, the inspector has been complicating our pour schedule when finding form oil over-sprayed on the rebar. Is it our misunderstanding that form oil on rebar shouldn’t pose a problem to the performance or the acceptance of our pre-pour inspection?

concrete_potable_water-tower


Answer: Your question addresses a common problem across the construction industry. Code edition after code edition presents challenges throughout the industry to remain current with the latest acceptable practices. This is a question of appropriate code reference — ACI 332 — rather than ACI 318, and of referencing the most recent version, ACI 332-10, instead of older versions -04 or -08.

Stated in section 4.2.4 of ACI 332-10, the code provides:

"4.2.4 Surface conditions of reinforcement—At the time concrete is placed, deformed bar and welded wire reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to development of bond strength between the reinforcement and the concrete."

"R4.2.4 Common surface contaminants such as concrete splatter, rust, form oil, or other release agents have been found not to be deleterious to bond."

First, during construction, nothing should be found on the reinforcement that would adversely affect the bond strength of the reinforcement in the concrete. Second, what common site conditions found on rebar are not to be considered deleterious to bond. Form oil is a surface contaminant that is not considered deleterious to bond.

Deformed bar and welded wire are designed to achieve a mechanical bond with the concrete rather than a chemical or adhesive bond. The mechanical bond relies on a keying action with the deformations along the length of the reinforcement bar. As long as the surface contaminants do not effectively eliminate the presence of those deformations, they would not be considered deleterious to bond.

ACI 332-10 is available through the bookstore at www.concrete.org.

To read the full article about concrete form oil on rebar go to, "Oil on Rebar."


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, concrete release removal

Happy Holidays!

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 20, 2018 1:06:28 PM

Season's Greetings from our family to yours.  

HG SALES MEETING DECEMBER 2018

Hill and Griffith's Management & Sales Team 


Google News about how Santa Claus upgraded his factory this year to meet higher demand

Santa Claus Foundry 2

Dodge Gives Santa a Rockin' Sleigh With Real Hellcat Redeye Power for Holiday Ad Campaign

Harper Precast Christmas

Happy Holidays from Harper Precast's Facebook Page

Santa Claus Foundry 4Santa Claus Foundry 3

Saint Nicholas and the Origin of Santa Claus


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, Happy Holidays

Safety Data Sheet Regulations for Concrete Form Releases

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 14, 2018 4:21:30 PM

The New Globally Harmonized System: The Right to Know

Are you or your employees at risk?

New rules, new regulations for concrete form releases. It seems that we are faced with these on an almost daily basis. If you are not up to date, you and your employees could be at risk, and your company could be facing penalties. The United States, in conjunction with other nations, has agreed to new rules regarding employee rights and need to know concerning hazardous materials (previously covered in Material Safety Data Sheets, or MSDSs). The new reference will be called Safety Data Sheets (SDSs).

We use many materials in the precast industry, and many of them have given us better castings – but always at a price. That price often comes in the form of special care and handling of materials that are classified as hazardous, including those that are considered flammable or combustible, or cause irritation, sensitivity, corrosion, and are proven or suspected carcinogens. Part of our responsibility is to help reduce the threat, whether minor or serious, to our workers and the environment. OSHA commonly refers to it as “the right to know.”

You are probably already aware of the new rules and regulations regarding SDSs and the training necessary to comply with the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS). This applies not just to precast suppliers, but the precast producer is also responsible for complying with certain regulations including training.

GHS Label Elements

In making a brief survey of precast and pipe producers, I found that while they are generally somewhat aware, most do not realize the full scope of the new regulations. Here is a quick overview of the GHS.

First, the MSDS is a thing of the past. It is now being replaced by the SDS, and while the format is very similar, there are some significant changes. You will need to have SDSs from all of your suppliers. Some states will have additional requirements, although they are not necessarily addressed here. 

June 1, 2015, is the time for everything to be in place. An additional review of the policies will occur June 1, 2016, after which there may be additional changes. However, some of the laws are already in effect. If you are not in compliance with them yet, you will need to move quickly. 

The Employer is responsible for:  

  • Identifying and maintaining a list of hazardous chemicals known to be present at the plant

  • Obtaining, keeping up to date and providing employee access to SDSs

  • Being sure that all hazardous materials are properly labeled

  • Presenting a training program for all employees who will be exposed to these hazardous materials

  • Having a written hazardous communication program in place

  • Having SDS information available to employees and ensuring they have access to the company training program

  • Ensuring that employees read and understand the SDSs and the label on the containers of all hazardous material

Perhaps the first area of concern to producers is the fact that employee training of the new GHS was to be completed by Dec. 1, 2013. If you haven’t already done so, now is the time to do it. 

Your training program must include:

  • The requirements of the standard

  • Places where hazardous chemicals are present in your work area

  • The location and availability of the written program, the chemical inventory and the SDSs

  • How to access the SDSs in your work area

  • How to read the SDSs

  • How to read the GHS-style container labels

  • Any specific labeling used in-house if different from the standards

  • Specific hazardous chemicals in the employees’ immediate work areas

  • How to detect the presence of a release of a hazardous chemical

  • The physical and health hazards of those chemicals

  • Measures you can use to protect yourself against these hazards

  • Required personal protective equipment (PPE) available and how to use it 

Next, you must have a written program and a list of all SDSs spelled out in the program.

All SDSs must be in English (worldwide), and additional languages also must be available to convey to employees in their native language or a language they understand. The manufacturer of the hazardous material is responsible only for supplying the SDS in English, so you are responsible for any additional languages.

Materials that fall under the GHS include: 

  • Health hazards

  • Physical hazards

  • Environmental hazards 

  • Hazards not other classified

  • Other hazardous chemical 

Hazard Warning Levels

Any material falling under the “hazardous” classification must have the following information on the label:

• Product identification
• Pictogram
• Signal word
• Hazard statement(s)
• Precautionary statement(s)
• Name, address and telephone number of the chemical 
manufacturer, importer or other responsible party 

Hazard Warning Labels

While there is no specific format for the label, all of the above must be clearly shown.

Pictograms are also required for quick identification of the hazard. On the SDS itself, there will now be a total of 16 sections – all of which must be completed for any material that falls under the hazardous classification: 

1. Identification

2. Hazard(s)identification

3. Composition/information on ingredients

4. First-aid measures

5. Firefighting measures

6. Accidental release measures

7. Handling and storage

8. Exposure controls/personal protection

9. Physical and chemical properties

10. Stability and reactivity

11. Toxicological information

12. Ecological information

13. Disposal considerations

14. Transport information

15. Regulatory information

16. Other information (including date of preparation or last revision) 

 

As a final note, all hazardous materials in your workplace must be cross-referenced by supplier and/or manufacturer.

These new OSHA regulations place an additional burden not only on the manufacturer/distributor, but also on the end user– you! Owners and operators are now responsible for keeping employees aware of any hazardous material on the premises, and all new employees must go through this training before being allowed in the workplace. OSHA will likely ask about the GHS in your workplace and assess stiff fines for not being in compliance.

The National Precast Concrete Association offers its members a free webinar titled “Webinar: Guide to Globally Harmonized System Documentation” by logging on to precast.org/ education.


Concrete Form Release SDS paper 3-14 

By Bob Waterloo, published in the March/April 2014 issue of PRECAST INC.

Bob Waterloo is Technical Sales Manager, Concrete Release Agents, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Cincinnati. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com

The online Precast Inc. magazine article is available at: precast.org/2014/03/new-globally-harmonized-system-right-know/.

For a PDF of this article, click here or on the image.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Pipe, Concrete Form Release, Saftey Data Sheet

Review: "Guide for Surface Finish of Formed Concrete"

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 6, 2018 1:05:46 PM

(This week's post is a review of the American Society of Concrete Construction's "Guide for Surface Finish of Formed Concrete." You can read it at Google Books here.)

Amazon Book's summary (April 1, 1999), "Exactly what is a smooth-form finish? What is a rough-form finish? To what extent are bugholes, voids and fins acceptable in each type? This easy-to-use guide explains and illustrates the answers to these questions and, even more importantly, serves as the standard for the differences between as-cast structural concrete finishes. The succinct, yet thorough, text includes a glossary and a handy table on as-cast finishes. But the guide's Presentation Photos are what make it truly unique. Three sets of 6 different, full-scale photographs depict various as-cast finishes, with bugholes and voids ranging from 1/16" or less to 2" across. Attach a Presentation Photo to a bid or specification to show what surface finish is to be expected."

Surface Finish of Formed Concrete.jpg 

 

(Jan 1, 2005 edition from Google Books)

Form Release Agents

Release agents are differentiated from form coatings or sealers that are usually applied in liquid form to contact surfaces either during manufacture or in the field. Coatings and sealers serve one or more of the following purposes:

  • Alter the texture of the contact surface 
  • Improve the durability of the contact surface
  • protect the contact surface from moisture

Release agents, on the other hand, are applied to the contact surface of the forms to prevent bond to the concrete and thus facilitate stripping. They can be applied to form materials during manufacture or applied to the form before each use. Manufacturers' recommendations should be followed in the use of coatings, sealers, and release agents (Reference 10-11), but ACI 347 recommends independent investigation of performance before using a new product.

There is no ACI standard to define these products, but the term form oil is frequently applied to petroleum compounds originally intended for other applications such as diesel fuel or heating oil, while release agent more often refers to products containing proprietary reactive ingredients specifically formulated for use on concrete forms. Release agents are commonly classified on the basis of how they act instead of what is in them. The two basic categories are barrier agents and chemically active agents, sometimes called reactive agents. Some release agents are a combination of the two types.

Barrier type releases agents create a physical barrier between the form surface and the fresh concrete, preventing the concrete from sticking to the form. Familiar examples are home heating oil, diesel oil, and used motor oil. U.S. environmental regulations prohibit the sale of these commodities as release agents, but they have been widely used because they are inexpensive and readily available. They are applied in relatively thick films, covering 200 to 600 sq ft per gallon, and such heavy applications can increase surface staining and bugholes on the concrete surface. If coated forms are left for several days before concrete is placed, barrier oils may evaporate, possibly leading to some sticking of the concrete to the form.

Chemically active or reactive agents contain an active ingredient that may be dissolver in an oil-based carrier or emulsified in a water-based carrier. The active ingredient is typically some type of fatty acid derived from plant or animal sources, and it combines chemically with calcium ions in the fresh concrete. The reaction product is a thin layer of what chemists refer to as a grease or metallic soap or salt; non-water-soluble, it permits the form to release readily from the hardened concrete.

The reactive fatty acid components are generally considered biodegradable and have found favor in the past decade because of increasingly stringent environmental regulations. For similar reasons, manufacturers have also been turning to water-based carriers, which will probably be subject to freezing.

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Gricote, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent

Beware of "Smooth - As Cast" Texture Description - There is no such thing

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 3, 2018 5:07:12 PM

The most commonly specified textures for precast include smooth, retarded and water-washed, form-lined, sand- or abrasive-blast, acid-etched or acid-washed, and tooled

Precast Concrete Smooth As Cast Texture and Form Oil

Smooth texture, as the term implies, is an as-cast finish. This texture is a direct result of the quality of the formwork surface. It is the least aesthetically pleasing but the most economical of the surface textures, especially if the surface is to be field painted. Form defects and color non-uniformities are noticeable with this finish texture, air voids are normal, and surface crazing should be expected.

 
 This post is based on a review of the Precast Concrete Manufacturers Association of Texas' informative site and their Designer's Notebook Specification Guidance Part 2.
 
Surface Finish of Formed Concrete
 
 
"Amazon Book's summary (April 1, 1999), "Exactly what is a smooth-form finish? What is a rough-form finish? To what extent are bugholes, voids and fins acceptable in each type? This easy-to-use guide explains and illustrates the answers to these questions and, even more importantly, serves as the standard for the differences between as-cast structural concrete finishes. The succinct, yet thorough, text includes a glossary and a handy table on as-cast finishes. But the guide's Presentation Photos are what make it truly unique. Three sets of 6 different, full-scale photographs depict various as-cast finishes, with bugholes and voids ranging from 1/16" or less to 2" across. Attach a Presentation Photo to a bid or specification to show what surface finish is to be expected."
 
Architectural-Concrete-Form-Release-Agent-9-1
 
 
"A word of warning, exposed concrete is the most difficult finish to achieve. A lot of designers think, "We're just going to cast the concrete, take the forms off and whatever is there, that's what we're going to take." Then, the first forms come off, they look at the concrete and say, "Oh my gosh, that's not what I wanted. What do I do now?" The only thing you can do is either paint it or tear it down and start over again. What I find that most designers want, most architects want when they say, "Exposed concrete", thinking it's not going to be architectural concrete, it's going to be exposed concrete, so it's going to be cheaper. They don't want exposed concrete. They want smooth as-cast architectural concrete, which is the most difficult finish to achieve. 

A word of warning, those of you that either design for exposed concrete or who have to build exposed concrete, what you are asking for and what you are going to receive may be two entirely different things. You have to understand the distinction between the two. 

Whenever somebody tells you that something is "Almost" like something else, you should usually run, don't walk. If exposed concrete is "Almost" like architectural concrete, that's a problem. Run away from those things, don't walk. If you want architectural concrete, specify architectural concrete."

From Precast Concrete Manufacturers Association of Texas:

2018 Best in Precast Concrete Award Program Opens


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agent, precast concrete texture, precast concrete surface finish

Precast Concrete Producer Profile: Team Elmer, Traverse City, MI

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 23, 2018 4:18:25 PM

Welcome to another episode of The Team Elmer's Update, where we take you past the orange barrels and onto the job site.

Precast concrete form oil 1

Manhole structures are vital components when reconstructing a roadway, connecting several underground pipes together, while allowing workers access to those underground facilities, but how was it made? Well, it's actually created ahead of time in a pre-cast production facility.

It's hard to mold things out of concrete in the field. A lot of bridges that you drive over are pre-cast bridge beams, so it basically means a plant took concrete of a certain specification and pre-stress steel, and molded that into a certain size for an application. It's a pre-cast structure. We're making something ahead of time in order to use in the field. The reason that we're using concrete in these applications is for strength and longevity.

 
It basically connects pipe, so you have a sewer pipe coming into a manhole, and a sewer pipe going out, and it allows you access to those pipes and underground facilities. Elmer's makes a variety of pre-cast products. We make pre-cast septic tanks. We make retaining wall blocks. A lot of the outlying plants, we make septic tanks with waste concrete. It depends on the health department code as far as what sizes are allowed in each county. We make 1200 gallon tanks. Some of them are double compartment. The biggest thing that we make probably is manhole structures, which are behind us.
 
Precast concrete form oil 3

First step is making a manhole is setting up your wire, rolling it, get your rebar out and tied onto it. The grease just fills any cracks where the metal doesn't fit real snug, and then the form oil has to be on there or you would never get the metal back out of your form. The concrete would stick right to it, and then you wouldn't be able to use your form again. Then you would flip it, set it down somewhere, and then strip the skins inside and outside of it, set it back down and redo the process.
 
Precast concrete form oil 4

Dave calls the concrete dispatch and asks for a load of concrete. The driver comes over and they actually just fill the form up with concrete.

Once you pour it, about eight hours is all you've really got to let it sit before you can pull it again. It all depends on how busy we are. Sometimes we pour certain stuff twice a day.
 
Precast concrete form oil 5

Dave and Keith have a lot of prep in what they do. They have to put the wire in the structures. They have to put lifting pins in the structures. They have to look at the plans and understand where they're going to put holes in the structures. They either cut those holes or ahead of time, they actually preform them. There's a lot of math behind it, a lot of skill behind it, and a lot of prep. It's not just pouring concrete and walking away.
 
Precast concrete form oil 6

But our pre-cast capabilities don't end there. Our production facility can also be used for a variety of other miscellaneous projects, including special events to benefit the community.

We recently built a memorial monument structure, which was very exciting. Barry, Dan, Keith and Dave did a very nice job with that. Max headed up that, and it's a really cool thing to go see. But really, you can make anything out of concrete. We do different things every year. It just depends on what the challenge is, and Dave and Keith are up for anything.
 
Precast concrete form oil 7

Thanks for tuning in to another episode of The Team Elmer's Update. As always, stay safe out there. We'll see you next time.

Don't forget to subscribe, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook. And check out teamelmers.com for more project information.-
 
Precast concrete form oil 8
 

From Team Elmer's News:

Christmas Tree? Check. Santa's House? Check.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

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On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agent, Concrete Casting Supplies, Precast Producer Profile

Do I need to remove concrete release agent from rebar?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 16, 2018 11:20:02 AM

No. A common misunderstanding in the concrete industry is clarified in this review of an article from ForConstructionPros.com.

Question: On several of our most recent projects, the inspector has been complicating our pour schedule when finding form oil over-sprayed on the rebar. Is it our misunderstanding that form oil on rebar shouldn’t pose a problem to the performance or the acceptance of our pre-pour inspection?

Answer: Your question addresses a common problem across the construction industry. Code edition after code edition presents challenges throughout the industry to remain current with the latest acceptable practices. This is a question of appropriate code reference — ACI 332 — rather than ACI 318, and of referencing the most recent version, ACI 332-10, instead of older versions -04 or -08.

Highest quality precast concrete plant -2

Stated in section 4.2.4 of ACI 332-10, the code provides:

"4.2.4 Surface conditions of reinforcement—At the time concrete is placed, deformed bar and welded wire reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to development of bond strength between the reinforcement and the concrete."

"R4.2.4 Common surface contaminants such as concrete splatter, rust, form oil, or other release agents have been found not to be deleterious to bond."

First, during construction, nothing should be found on the reinforcement that would adversely affect the bond strength of the reinforcement in the concrete. Second, what common site conditions found on rebar are not to be considered deleterious to bond. Form oil is a surface contaminant that is not considered deleterious to bond.

Deformed bar and welded wire are designed to achieve a mechanical bond with the concrete rather than a chemical or adhesive bond. The mechanical bond relies on a keying action with the deformations along the length of the reinforcement bar. As long as the surface contaminants do not effectively eliminate the presence of those deformations, they would not be considered deleterious to bond.

ACI 332-10 is available through the bookstore at www.concrete.org.

To read the full article about concrete form oil on rebar go to, "Oil on Rebar."


The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Concrete Form Oil

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