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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Concrete Release Agent Selection for NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 30, 2019 10:02:33 PM

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

Developed by a team of scientists, industry experts and key industry stakeholders, NSF/ANSI 61 sets health effects criteria for many water system components including:

  • Protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings)
  • Joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants)
  • Mechanical devices (water meters, valves, filters)
  • Pipes and related products (pipe, hose, fittings)
  • Plumbing devices (faucets, drinking fountains)
  • Process media (filter media, ion exchange resins)
  • Non-metallic potable water materials

(From the NSF (National Sanitation Foundation) site.

Benefits of Certification

Certification to NSF/ANSI 61 ensures that your product meets the regulatory requirements for the U.S. and Canada, and it can often meet or fulfill the testing requirements for many other countries as well. Market leaders strive to attain NSF certification as a mark of distinction that provides their customers with assurance that their product is safe for use in drinking water.

NSF/ANSI 61 testing covers all products with drinking water contact from source to tap, and determines what contaminants may migrate or leach from your product into drinking water. It also confirms if they are below the maximum levels allowed to be considered safe.

Certification also allows your company to:

  • List your product in our online directory of certified drinking water system components
  • Use the NSF certification mark on your products and in your promotional materials

Why Work With NSF?

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

Certification Process

We distinguish ourselves due to our thorough product evaluation, but our certification process is simple and efficient. We assign you a dedicated NSF project manager as a single point of contact to guide you through the certification process and oversee your certification project every step of the way.

Seven Simple Steps to Certification:

  1. Your company submits an application.
  2. You provide product formulation, toxicology and product use information.
  3. Our toxicology department reviews formulations.
  4. We perform a plant audit and sample collection.
  5. Our laboratory conducts testing.
  6. We complete a final toxicology evaluation.
  7. We grant NSF certification for compliant products and you can use the NSF mark on products, packaging and marketing materials.

Our experts can help you reduce overall costs and expedite your time to market by bundling services and reducing the number of contracted service providers and facility audits.

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

Precast Concrete News at NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Benchmarking Your Business

Advocating for Infrastructure

Personalize Your Member Experience


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water

Grifcote® LV-50 Plus NSF Approved Potable Water Concrete Form Release Agent

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 10, 2019 4:58:27 PM

Potable Water Concrete Release Agent

Grifcote LV-50 Plus was created specifically for use with castings that would be exposed to potable water.

The material is NSF (ANSI 61) approved for use with potable water and some restrictions do apply in specific applications.

Low VOC and Biodegradable Release Agent

  • All Grifcote products are EPA VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) compliant with less than 250 grams per liter of VOCs. Grifcote is compliant in all 50 States and Canada.

  • All are classified as either readily biodegradable, with a half-life of 28 days or less or inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or less.

  • All products comply with federal or state regulations regarding concrete release agents.

  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete Water Tank posts by Hill and Griffith in Google

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

NPCA extends product-specific certification to water, wastewater tanks 

Why Precast Concrete Cistern pH is Important


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Apr 25, 2019 4:55:38 PM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Any water that is stationary will eventually become stagnant and undrinkable. How water is stored and its temperature will determine how long the water stays healthy and drinkable. Spring water is often considered as the best water you can drink, store your water in an underground concrete tank and you are producing your own spring water.

Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks
Image from Colorado Precast Concrete.

Why tank water is so acidic

Underground concrete tanks is normally roof harvested rain water, which is naturally acidic. The acidity of normal rain is attributed mainly to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere which gets absorbed as water condenses from a gas to a liquid and it is these liquid droplets that forms clouds and eventually rain. Even in areas that are minimally affected by human pollution, the pH of rain water can range from 4.5 to 5.0 which is fairly acidic.

In built-up areas around cities, above normal acid rain is generally caused by human pollution and in highly polluted cities rain water can become as acidic as lemon juice which causes lots of problems for old historic buildings.

This acidity forms part of the natural process that allows rain water, with the help of microbes found in the soil, to dissolve minerals from the soil into a colloidal form that now makes the water neutral and full of minerals which can then be taken up by plants. Acidic water is however not choosy and will happily do the same thing in the human body. Resulting in the stealing of alkalizing minerals and therefore a net loss of these vital minerals from the body as the water attempts to achieve a more neutral pH balance.

Precast Concrete Potable Water Tanks

Why is concrete the best material to store water in

The very nature of water itself is that it wants to balance out to a neutral pH. and a concrete tank is the only man made storage system that will allow this to happen. To neutralize itself, water will absorb some of the minerals out of the concrete and will generally settle in a slightly alkaline state.

An in-ground concrete water tank will keep the water at the temperature that it fell out of the sky at and if you are in an area that gets mostly winter rain, that cold water will remain cold all summer.

Even above ground, light cannot penetrate through the concrete walls of a concrete and into the water.

All of this become very important, because roof harvested rain water picks up all sorts of dust, bacteria, and bugs and even after being pre-filtered some always gets through.

Water that is alkaline, cold and removed from light will not support the growth of any bacteria that makes its way into your tank, thus allowing this water to stay clean and drinkable for years.

If you cannot put your tank underground, paint it white; or allow ivy to cover it to keep the sun off it and the water will stay very cold.

Yes in time, this leaching of minerals will compromise the integrity of a concrete tank, but a well-made tank is good for a hundred odd years.

(Thanks to Versatile Tanks for this article)


If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete Water Tank posts by Hill and Griffith in Google

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

NPCA extends product-specific certification to water, wastewater tanks 

Why Precast Concrete Cistern pH is Important


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Prevent Concrete Bughole Surface Void Formation

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 17, 2019 12:20:14 PM

Using concrete as an architectural material has brought the quality in surface appearance to an important consideration.

One of the problems affecting the surface aesthetics of concrete are bugholes. Bugholes are surface voids from the migration of mostly entrapped air to the fresh concrete form surface, mostly in the vertical plane.

preventing_bug_holes

Photo from Precast Inc. Magazine's May/June 2014 issue.


During setting, the shrinkage of the concrete forces entrapped air voids and excess water out of the mix. Water migrates upward due to density and becomes bleed water. The air bubbles seek pressure equilibrium and when in a vertical form, that's to the interior surface. These bubbles need to be directed vertically to the surface of the concrete form. Bugholes are found in the upper portion of the concrete structure or at angled form surfaces as a result of accumulation of escaping air along the height of the structure. They are primarily an aesthetic problem for exposed surfaces.

Causes

The biggest cause of bugholes is improper vibration. Consolidation through vibration, sets the bubbles into motion and sends both entrapped air and excess water to the surface.

Bughole formation can also be caused by the form material and the type of form release used.

When a chemically reactive form release agent is used, a nonviolent chemical reaction takes place when fatty acids react with free lime on the surface of fresh concrete. This reaction results in the formation of a metallic soap, a slippery material that allows air bubbles to rise along the vertical surface. This “soapy” film also prevents the hardened concrete from adhering to the forms during stripping.

Thicker coatings on forms are typical of the older barrier-type materials, like heavyweight used motor oil, vegetable oils, diesel fuel and kerosene. Barrier type release agents are less expensive than chemically reactive agents, but they are not generally recommended for reducing SCC bug holes."

Mix design can also contribute to bughole formation. A sticky or stiff mixture that is hard to consolidate can increase surface void formation.

Reduce Bugholes

Solutions

The vibrator should penetrate the previous lift and work the entrapped air towards the form and then up the sides. More vibration is necessary with impermeable forms, to move the air voids to the free surface of the concrete.

Flowing mixtures reduce bughole formation. Concrete that limits excessive fine aggregate, has the proper cement content, and uses admixture for increased flow contributes to bughole reduction. Self-consolidating concrete is becoming increasing popular for precast to improve surface quality.

Bugholes are not detrimental to structural concrete. But, with the increased use of concrete in finished construction, surface quality is important. Through careful selection of materials, quality workmanship, and dutiful supervision, surface voids can be minimized.

Learn more, "Concrete Bug Hole Prevention"

Causes & Fixes for SCC Bug Holes


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Institute, Concrete Bugholes, Bug Hole

"Form Release Agents," Technical Q&A from the American Concrete Institute Review

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 11, 2019 5:05:58 PM

ACI committees, membership, and staff have answered common questions on a variety of concrete related topics

Form release agents

Q. I need to select a form release agent for a new project requiring an architectural finish. Can you provide information on different types of form release agents and recommendations for using them? Does ACI have a publication on form release agents I could use as a reference?

American Concrete Association Form Release


A. Form release agents ease formwork removal, extending the useful life of a form and improving the smoothness and texture of concrete surfaces. Two main types are available: barrier and chemically active.

Barrier-type agents (examples include diesel oil, wax, and silicone) create a barrier between the form and the concrete. These are not recommended for architectural concrete, because they can cause stains, surface air voids, and problems with form removal in very cold or very hot weather; they also may prevent subsequent adhesion of coatings to the hardened concrete. While diesel oil was once commonly used, it’s now prohibited because the associated volatile organic content (VOC) emissions contribute to smog. (Note: In the United States, form release agents have to meet federal VOC limits of 450 g/L [3.8 lb/gal.] and may have to meet more restrictive limits of 250 g/L [2.2 lb/gal.] in some states.)

Chemically active form release agents (certain types of fatty acids) react with calcium ions in the cement paste to produce a soap that prevents concrete from bonding to the formwork. Based on the reactivity, they are divided into buffered (partially) reactive and fully reactive. Buffered agents produce an improved soap film that helps remove entrapped air and may promote better flow of a thin skin of cement paste at the surface of the form. Fully reactive agents can provide a good basic soap film that, depending on the brand, works well in most cases. Because chemically active form release agents produce fewer bugholes, stains, and surface irregularities than barrier type of form release agents, they are commonly used for architectural concrete.

For more information on this topic refer to ACI 347R “Guide to Formwork for Concrete”, ACI 303R “303R-12 Guide to Cast-in-Place Architectural Concrete Practice”, and ACI 533R “Guide for Precast Concrete Wall Panels”.

References: ACI 347R-14; ACI 303R-12; ACI 533R-11


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Institute

NSF Concrete Form Release Agent Evaluation

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 27, 2018 12:40:14 PM

Concrete additives or release agents that contain contaminants, can cause compliance problems for the municipal drinking water utility and present potential health risks to the consumer.

Overview

 

Drinking water contaminants can come from many sources, including the equipment used for water storage and transportation. Concrete used in large storage tanks, reservoirs and pipelines is usually a combination of cement, admixtures, curing compound, sand and gravel. It can also contain fly ash and other additives to strengthen the concrete and increase its durability. However, any of these additives can have contaminants that can cause compliance problems for the utility and present potential health risks to the consumer. If any of these additives can have contaminants that can cause compliance problems for the utility and present potential health risks to the consumer.
 
NSF Certified Form Release
 
 

The following are excerpts pertaining to release agents.
 
5 Barrier materials
 
5.1 Scope 
 
The requirements of this section apply to products and materials intended to form a barrier providing containment of drinking water or to prevent drinking water contact with another surface. The products and materials that are covered include, but are not limited to: coatings and paints applied to fittings, pipes, mechanical devices and non residential storage tanks, linings, liners, bladders and diaphragms, and constituents of concrete and cement-mortar (e.g., Portland and blended hydraulic cements, admixtures, sealers, and mold release agents. These products and materials can be field-applied, factory applied, precast, or cast in place.
 
5.2 Definitions
 
5.2.10 form/mold release agent: A material applied to the inside of a form or mold used to cast concrete or cement-mortar, which prevents adhesion of the concrete or cement-mortar to its surface. 
 
5.5 Extraction Procedures
 
5.5.2.4 Products requiring cement mortar cubes
 
Test sample mortar cubes shall be prepared in accordance to the applicable sections of ASTM C 109. Mix water shall meet reagent water requirements (see Annex B, section B.9.2.1 ). Sand shall be washed in accordance with the procedures in ASTM C 778. Mixing tools and other items coming into contact with the mortar shall be washed with soap and water, rinsed with tap water, rinsed with reagent water, and rinsed with isopropyl alcohol. The mortar shall be placed in polyethylene or polypropylene lined molds; no form release agents shall be used. Specimens shall be removed from the molds after 24 h and placed in glass or polyethylene beakers and covered with an inverted watch glass supported on glass Rebel hooks (or other devices to prevent air seal of the vessel) and placed for 28 d ± 12 h, or fewer as specified by the manufacturer, in a moist cabinet meeting the requirements of ASTM C 511. The specimens shall be removed from the moist cabinet and air dried at 23 ± 2 °C (73 ± 4 °F) and 50 ± 5% relative humidity for 7 d. 
 
5.5.2.4.4 Form and mold release agents
 
These products shall be applied per manufacturer specifications to the mold used during the preparation of the test cubes (see 5.5.2.4 ). 
 
5.5.4 Conditioning (optional)
 
Test samples shall be conditioned immediately after curing. This conditioning procedure simulates the disinfection of water mains and storage tanks prior to placing into service, and is based on AWWA Standards C651-05 and C652-02. Coatings intended for pipes and fittings can be conditioned as follows:
1) prepare 50 mg/L free available chlorine solution using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI - reagent grade or equivalent);
2) using a spray bottle, spray the previously rinsed test samples, wetting all surfaces to be exposed;
3) let the test samples stand for at least 3 hours; and
4) place the test samples in racks, rinse with cold tap water, and rinse with reagent water, meeting the requirements of Annex B, section B.9.2.1.
 
5.5.5 Exposure protocols
 
For all test samples, exposure shall commence immediately following the conditioning step. If immediate exposure is not possible, the test samples shall be dried in a laminar flow hood and exposed within 4 h. Successful evaluation at an elevated exposure temperature shall preclude testing at a lower exposure temperature. A separate sample shall be exposed for each type of exposure water selected in 5.5.3.
 
The exact surface area-to-volume ratio achieved during the exposure shall be recorded.
 
5.5.5.1 Cold application
 
Cold application product samples, as designated by the manufacturer, shall be placed in an exposure vessel and completely covered with exposure water of the applicable pH (see 5.5.3). The exposure vessel shall be placed in a 23 ± 2 °C (73 ± 4 °F) environment for the duration of the exposure period.

Benefits of NSF Certification

To help minimize the risk of contaminants, NSF certifies individual concrete ingredients to the requirements of NSF/ANSI Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects. Our Concrete Site Mix Design Evaluation Program provides a one-time evaluation that certifies concrete consisting of non-certified cement or other ingredients against this same standard.

NSF/ANSI 61 testing covers all products with drinking water contact from source to tap, and determines what contaminants may migrate or leach from your product into drinking water. It also confirms if they are below the maximum levels allowed to be considered safe.
 
NSF Certification Process

We require information on each ingredient in the site mix and details of its end use structure. Since we have worked with the cement admixture industry for over 20 years, we are able to obtain any additional information on ingredient composition relatively quickly. We perform testing on concrete cylinders manufactured from the mix, including analysis for the potential release of regulated metals, radionuclides, volatile organics and other contaminants that may leach directly into drinking water. Results are typically available in 30 days or less.
 

For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Wildwood, NJ Beach House is Hurricane-Ready Thanks to Precast Concrete

PCI Certification Expands Smith-Columbia's Market Reach

Precast Concrete Infrastructure Construction Product Demand to Increase 4.4% Annually Through 2022


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Potable Water Tanks

Precast Concrete Form Cleaning and Release Application for Potable Water Tanks

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 20, 2018 2:52:02 PM

Quality Control for Precast Concrete Form Release for Potable Water

concrete_potable_water-tower

Pre-pour operations

1. Cleaning of Forms

After each use, forms need to be cleaned. Tape, polystyrene, concrete, and other materials sticking to the forms needs to be removed. It is easiest to clean forms immediately after products are stripped. Waiting too long allows the concrete to bond more strongly to the forms.

2. Form Release Agent Application

Form release agent needs to be applied after cleaning the forms and sealing the seams. Don't over-apply form release agent, which may lead to puddling. It is recommended that form release agents be applied in a thin coat. Puddles need to be drained or mopped up before casting.


Items to be embedded in concrete, such as re-bar and other fixtures need to be clean of form release agent. Release agents stop concrete from bonding or sticking to molds. Rebar, inserts and other items, which concrete release agents have been applied may fail to bond to concrete and not be effective in their functions.


For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Northeast Ohio Precast Opens in Salem

Why Choose Easi-Set Precast Concrete Buildings

Steven Holl’s Glassell School of Art is clad with 178 unique precast panels


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Potable Water Tanks

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 5, 2018 8:27:33 AM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Any water that is stationary will eventually become stagnant and undrinkable. How water is stored and its temperature will determine how long the water stays healthy and drinkable. Spring water is often considered as the best water you can drink, store your water in an underground concrete tank and you are producing your own spring water.

Precast Concrete Potable Water Tanks

Why tank water is so acidic

Underground concrete tanks is normally roof harvested rain water, which is naturally acidic. The acidity of normal rain is attributed mainly to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere which gets absorbed as water condenses from a gas to a liquid and it is these liquid droplets that forms clouds and eventually rain. Even in areas that are minimally affected by human pollution, the pH of rain water can range from 4.5 to 5.0 which is fairly acidic.

In built-up areas around cities, above normal acid rain is generally caused by human pollution and in highly polluted cities rain water can become as acidic as lemon juice which causes lots of problems for old historic buildings.

This acidity forms part of the natural process that allows rain water, with the help of microbes found in the soil, to dissolve minerals from the soil into a colloidal form that now makes the water neutral and full of minerals which can then be taken up by plants. Acidic water is however not choosy and will happily do the same thing in the human body. Resulting in the stealing of alkalizing minerals and therefore a net loss of these vital minerals from the body as the water attempts to achieve a more neutral pH balance.

Why is concrete the best material to store water in

The very nature of water itself is that it wants to balance out to a neutral pH. and a concrete tank is the only man made storage system that will allow this to happen. To neutralize itself, water will absorb some of the minerals out of the concrete and will generally settle in a slightly alkaline state.

An in-ground concrete water tank will keep the water at the temperature that it fell out of the sky at and if you are in an area that gets mostly winter rain, that cold water will remain cold all summer.

Even above ground, light cannot penetrate through the concrete walls of a concrete and into the water.

All of this become very important, because roof harvested rain water picks up all sorts of dust, bacteria, and bugs and even after being pre-filtered some always gets through.

Water that is alkaline, cold and removed from light will not support the growth of any bacteria that makes its way into your tank, thus allowing this water to stay clean and drinkable for years.

If you cannot put your tank underground, paint it white; or allow ivy to cover it to keep the sun off it and the water will stay very cold.

Yes in time, this leaching of minerals will compromise the integrity of a concrete tank, but a well-made tank is good for a hundred odd years.

(Thanks to Versatile Tanks for this article)


If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

• Water Tank Market: Emerging Trends, Highlights and Challenges Forecast 2023

• Water Storage Systems Market: Evolving Technology, Trends and Industry Analysis & Forecast to 2022

Global Water Storage Tanks Market Outlook 2018- ZCL Composites, Synalloy Corporation, AG Growth International


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water Concrete Release Agent Selection

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 28, 2018 10:41:03 AM

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

Developed by a team of scientists, industry experts and key industry stakeholders, NSF/ANSI 61 sets health effects criteria for many water system components including:

  • Protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings)
  • Joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants)
  • Mechanical devices (water meters, valves, filters)
  • Pipes and related products (pipe, hose, fittings)
  • Plumbing devices (faucets, drinking fountains)
  • Process media (filter media, ion exchange resins)
  • Non-metallic potable water materials

(From the NSF (National Sanitation Foundation) site.

Benefits of Certification

Certification to NSF/ANSI 61 ensures that your product meets the regulatory requirements for the U.S. and Canada, and it can often meet or fulfill the testing requirements for many other countries as well. Market leaders strive to attain NSF certification as a mark of distinction that provides their customers with assurance that their product is safe for use in drinking water.

NSF/ANSI 61 testing covers all products with drinking water contact from source to tap, and determines what contaminants may migrate or leach from your product into drinking water. It also confirms if they are below the maximum levels allowed to be considered safe.

Certification also allows your company to:

  • List your product in our online directory of certified drinking water system components
  • Use the NSF certification mark on your products and in your promotional materials

Why Work With NSF?

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

Certification Process

We distinguish ourselves due to our thorough product evaluation, but our certification process is simple and efficient. We assign you a dedicated NSF project manager as a single point of contact to guide you through the certification process and oversee your certification project every step of the way.

Seven Simple Steps to Certification:

  1. Your company submits an application.
  2. You provide product formulation, toxicology and product use information.
  3. Our toxicology department reviews formulations.
  4. We perform a plant audit and sample collection.
  5. Our laboratory conducts testing.
  6. We complete a final toxicology evaluation.
  7. We grant NSF certification for compliant products and you can use the NSF mark on products, packaging and marketing materials.

Our experts can help you reduce overall costs and expedite your time to market by bundling services and reducing the number of contracted service providers and facility audits.

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Precast Concrete Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report By Product Type (Structural, Architectural, Transportation, Water & Waste Handling), By End Use, By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2018 - 2025

Historic Louisville architecture gets a sleek new look by de Leon & Primmer

Register for NPCA 53rd Annual Convention


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water

Precast Concrete Company Spotlight - Dura Art Stone

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 21, 2018 3:55:38 PM

When we learn about a precast concrete company; whose work just blows us away, we like to share it.

Dura Art Stone's About Us page, Enjoy.

A Pioneering History

Dura Art Stone traces its history to 1935 when Bruno Mariani, an accomplished Italian model maker and craftsman, quickly established himself as a leading source of Ornamental Cast Plaster and Cast Stone in San Francisco, CA. One of Bruno’s early works at the Pulgas Water Temple in Redwood City, CA, completed in 1941, remains beautiful and functional to this day. From the start, we have pioneered new uses of materials as outlined below.

1935
COMPANY FOUNDED

 

1941-1

1941
PULGAS WATER TEMPLE

1968-1

1968
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
FIRST BRICK CLAD PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS IN CALIFORNIA

1970-1

1970
ROSICRUCIAN MUSEUM
FIRST USE OF RESIN BASED POLYMER CONCRETE MATCHING PRECAST CONCRETE

1972-1

1972
TRANSAMERICA PYRAMID
FIRST LARGE SCALE ARCHITECTURAL PRECAST PANELS WITH QUARTZ AGGREGATE AND ETCHED FINISH

1978-1-1

1978
WELLS FARGO DATA CENTER
FIRST GLASS FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE PANELS IN CALIFORNIA

24-1

1980
LEVI’S PLAZA
FIRST BRICK CLAD PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS UTILIZING RADIUS CUT BRICKS

38-1

1980
SAKS FIFTH AVE
FIRST USE OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE PANELS WITH INTEGRALLY COLOR COURSE AGGREGATE FACE MIX

1984-1-1

1984
CHEVRON CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS
FIRST LARGE SCALE (300,000 SF) CERAMIC TILE CLAD PRECAST PANELS IN CALIFORNIA

90

1990
SEVEN DWARFS
DISNEY CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS
FIRST LARGE SCALE USE OF GFRC FOR 18′ HIGH SCULPTURES IN CALIFORNIA

2004-1-1

2004
SAN MATEO HIGH SCHOOL
FIRST BRICK CLAD PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS IN THE US UTILIZING DRUNKEN SAILOR BOND BRICK PATTERNS

56-1

2017

THE VILLAGE
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
FIRST LARGE SCALE (500,000 SF) USE OF ARCHITECTURAL PANELS AND TRIM DOWELLED INTO BRICK CLAD PANELS WITH SHEAR KEYS AND WATER STOPS, IN CONJUNCTION WITH CORESLAB STRUCTURES, LA.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute

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