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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Stop by Booth 1427 at the 2020 Precast Show in Ft. Worth thru Saturday

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 6, 2020 11:38:40 AM

HG 2020 Precast ShowIMG_2592 560

Left to right: Bob Waterloo, Tom Dempsey, Mike Lawry, Angela Cox and Barry Morgan will help you with your precasting needs.

The Precast Show is the largest precast-specific trade show in North America and the one place where you can find the industry’s most important suppliers and foremost equipment experts under one roof. We are looking forward to seeing you March 5-7, 2020, in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Precast Show is sponsored by the National Precast Concrete Association and the Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute with additional collaboration from the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute and the Cast Stone Institute.

HG Concrete ad

Grifcote® and Cast-O-Magic Concrete Form Release Agents

VOC Compliant, NSF Certified and Biodegradable Release Agents for all Concrete Applications

THE PERFECT RELEASE

Industry Leading Performance and Quality
Trained technicians are available to visit your site, determine your needs and design the right product for you.

• Gricote FR-50 & PR-5S voe - Workhorse Release
• Grifcote LV-50 Plus - NSF Certified for Potable Water - Release
• Grifcote Bio-Gold - Environmentally Friendly Release
• Grifcote CC-1S0 VOC - Premium Seasoning Agent
• Cast-O-Magic, Con-Solver and Liquid Chisel
• Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel Forms

https://precast.org/theprecastshow/


More News from the Precast Show


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Precast Show, Concrete Form Release Agent, National Precast Concrete Association

Producers' Guide: Form Release Agents

Posted by M.K. Hurd on Mar 5, 2020 8:00:00 AM

Excerpt from the February 2000 Concrete Construction Article by M.K. Hurd

Concrete form-release agents represent only a small fraction of the cost of a manufactured concrete item, but they have a big influence on the quality and success of the concrete surface.

Though no American Concrete Institute or ASTM standards define these products, common usage suggests that form release agents are materials containing proprietary reactive ingredients specifically formulated for use on concrete forms. ACI 301-96, “Standard Specification for Structural Concrete,” does, however, give performance-based requirements for release agents. Section 2.2.1.30 says to use “commercially manufactured form-release agents that will prevent formwork absorption of moisture, prevent bond with concrete, and not stain concrete surfaces.”

Concrete Form Release Application photo

Today, precasters can choose from among hundreds of form-release products, and new ones are still being developed. Many changes have been introduced as manufacturers scramble to meet federal and state environmental regulations, particularly with respect to volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

With the myriad form-release products available, how do you select the best one for a particular application? Here are a few of the fundamental questions you should ask:

  • On what form surfaces can it be used?
  • Will it provide clean, easy release without damage to either the concrete or the form?
  • Will it produce a stain- and blemish-free concrete surface?
  • Is it compatible with admixtures in the fresh concrete and with surface coatings that may be applied later to the hardened concrete?
  • Is it ready for use without site mixing, and is it appropriate for anticipated casting and curing temperatures?
  • Is it user-friendly and compliant with environmental regulations?

The table on pages 61-68 answers some of these questions and summarizes manufacturers’ recommendations for many currently available form release products. How release agents work Release agents are classified by how they work rather than what they contain. Two basic categories are barrier agents and chemically active agents (also referred to as reactive agents). Some release agents are a combination of the two types. Barrier-type release agents create a barrier between the form surface and the fresh concrete, preventing the concrete from sticking to the form

Read More

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, Concrete Construction Magazine

Composition of Concrete Release Agents

Posted by Jonathan Meier on Feb 28, 2020 2:14:18 PM

Content from Civil Engineering

The quality of the concrete finish is affected by many factors. These include the concrete mix design and  its constituents, the formwork, the compaction, the temperature and the curing process and also the mold or formwork release agent used. The influence of the release agent is described below and advice is given on how to select and use concrete release agents correctly.

Composition of Release Agents

Release agents can be formulated from up to three different types of ingredients.

  • Release Film Formers
  • Additives
  • Thinners

Spraying Concrete Release Agent

Release Film Formers

These include the base materials, which are largely responsible for the release effect (usually various oils).
Used or waste oil was once the main concrete release substance, but these should not be used nowadays due to their quality fluctuations and also for environmental reasons. In addition to mineral oil distillates and simple raffinates (with a variable hydrocarbon content), there are now high-grade mineral oil products on the market (such as technical white oils and paraffin oils) and it is possible to obtain low-aromatic or practically aromatic free oils – depending on the refining process and conditions (e.g. medical white oil). The lower the aromatics content, the more environmentally friendly and easy to use this product is. Special synthetic oils can also be obtained from paraffin wax by the hydrocracking process. Some products which are used as release agents are rapidly biodegradable, such as vegetable oils, but these are extremely sensitive to temperature, unlike the synthetic oils, which can safely be used over a broader temperature range.

Additives

These are materials used to achieve additional or intensified effects and to improve product stability. They include release boosters (usually fatty acids or their derivatives), wetting agents, rust inhibitors, preservatives and surfactants required for emulsions. Most of the release agents in use today contain additives which react chemically with the concrete (to disrupt the setting process). It is then much easier to separate concrete from formwork and a more general-purpose product can be produced. This effect occurs because these fatty acids, or their derivatives, react with alkaline hydroxides in the cement to form calcium soaps and water.

Thinners

These products act as viscosity reducers for the release-film formers and additives described above. Their purpose is to adjust the workability, layer or coating thickness and the drying time before concreting can take place. Thinners are generally organic solvents (usually aliphatic hydrocarbons) or water in the case of water-based emulsion products.

Read More

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, Civil Engineer Magazine

The Importance of Precast Concrete Cistern pH

Posted by Jonathan Meier on Feb 21, 2020 2:34:44 PM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Jonathan Meier with Rain Brothers LLC covers the basics.

Concrete cisterns are, in our experience, the best type of tank to use for underground drinking water systems. Rainwater tends to have a lower pH (acidic), while concrete has a higher pH (alkaline). As rainwater fills a concrete tank, the concrete then actually helps neutralize the water and balance the pH, if not slightly alkalinize it, which is why, after the cistern has gone through a few empty-full cycles, a litmus test of your cistern water would reveal a pH of between 6-8 – the optimal range for a good drinking water system.

Precast Concrete Cistern for Drinking Water

While concrete cisterns help neutralize acidic rainwater, initially, the residual concrete dust from the manufacturing/casting of the tanks will elevate the water's pH to high alkaline levels (10-11). This is completely normal, though for new concrete cisterns, precautions should be taken to get water down to 7-9 range. There are two approaches to managing this initial alkalinity:

1) Flush the tank. For this method, we recommend hauling in a load of water from a local water hauler (in Ohio, a list of water haulers can be obtained through your County's Department of Health or from the Ohio Department of Health Office of Environmental Health). You can then use the hauled water to rinse the walls of the tank to remove as much concrete dust residue as possible. Do not drink this water, but instead either pump it out after a few days or use it for non-potable applications (flushing toilets, showering, irrigation, etc.). Occasionally, it may take two and sometimes three full empty-fill cycles before the water inside the tank reaches a safe pH level of 9.

2) Pressure wash/scrub. For this method, once the tank has initially been installed, use a pressure washer with a 55-gallon drum of clean water and a cup of unscented chlorine bleach to pressure wash the walls of the tank. You may also use a scrub brush with a bucket of water/chlorine mix and hand scrub the walls. Doing so will remove the majority of concrete dust from the side walls. Then, when possible, pump out the water from the bottom of the tank (note: you may have to put more water into the tank to be able to pump the "dirty water" out). If it is not possible to pump out the bottom of the tank after pressure washing/scrubbing, then get a load of hauled water into the tank but do not drink water from this load. Again, use that first load for non-potable uses only.

(Washing the tank will also remove the NSF approved concrete form release. Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.)

These precautions may sound intimidating, but the reality is that the work on the front end is minimal compared to the lifetime of fresh, clean water you will receive from a concrete cistern. 

As always, thanks for reading.

(Thanks to Rain Brothers LLC for this article and video below.)


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Concrete Release Agent Selection for NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 30, 2019 10:02:33 PM

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

Developed by a team of scientists, industry experts and key industry stakeholders, NSF/ANSI 61 sets health effects criteria for many water system components including:

  • Protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings)
  • Joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants)
  • Mechanical devices (water meters, valves, filters)
  • Pipes and related products (pipe, hose, fittings)
  • Plumbing devices (faucets, drinking fountains)
  • Process media (filter media, ion exchange resins)
  • Non-metallic potable water materials

(From the NSF (National Sanitation Foundation) site.

Benefits of Certification

Certification to NSF/ANSI 61 ensures that your product meets the regulatory requirements for the U.S. and Canada, and it can often meet or fulfill the testing requirements for many other countries as well. Market leaders strive to attain NSF certification as a mark of distinction that provides their customers with assurance that their product is safe for use in drinking water.

NSF/ANSI 61 testing covers all products with drinking water contact from source to tap, and determines what contaminants may migrate or leach from your product into drinking water. It also confirms if they are below the maximum levels allowed to be considered safe.

Certification also allows your company to:

  • List your product in our online directory of certified drinking water system components
  • Use the NSF certification mark on your products and in your promotional materials

Why Work With NSF?

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

Certification Process

We distinguish ourselves due to our thorough product evaluation, but our certification process is simple and efficient. We assign you a dedicated NSF project manager as a single point of contact to guide you through the certification process and oversee your certification project every step of the way.

Seven Simple Steps to Certification:

  1. Your company submits an application.
  2. You provide product formulation, toxicology and product use information.
  3. Our toxicology department reviews formulations.
  4. We perform a plant audit and sample collection.
  5. Our laboratory conducts testing.
  6. We complete a final toxicology evaluation.
  7. We grant NSF certification for compliant products and you can use the NSF mark on products, packaging and marketing materials.

Our experts can help you reduce overall costs and expedite your time to market by bundling services and reducing the number of contracted service providers and facility audits.

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

Precast Concrete News at NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Benchmarking Your Business

Advocating for Infrastructure

Personalize Your Member Experience


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water

Grifcote® and Cast-O-Magic® Concrete Form Release Agents

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 17, 2019 4:17:55 PM

The Perfect Release

VOC Compliant, NSF Certified* and Biodegradable Release Agents for All Concrete Applications

20190513 HG_1-2pgH_TPR copy

Industry Leading Performance and Quality

Trained technicians are available to visit your site, determine your needs and design the right product for you.

concrete_ties-1
Gricote FR-50 & PR-SS VOC - Workhorse Release


concrete_potable_water-tower-1
Grifcote LV-50 Plus - NSF Certified for Potable Water Release


concrete_bio_gold_form-1
Grifcote Bio-Gold - Environmentally Friendly Release


concrete_junction_form-1
Grifcote CC-150 VOC - Premium Seasoning Agent

form-release-agent-cast-o-magic-sizes-sq
Cast-O-Magic, Con-Solver and Liquid Chisel

consolver-concrete-dissolver-sq
Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel Forms

Nationwide and International Distribution


Precast Concrete News From the National Precast Concrete Association

• NPCA President Search

• Benchmarking Your Business

• Advocating for Infrastructure


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent

Grifcote® LV-50 Plus NSF Approved Potable Water Concrete Form Release Agent

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 10, 2019 4:58:27 PM

Potable Water Concrete Release Agent

Grifcote LV-50 Plus was created specifically for use with castings that would be exposed to potable water.

The material is NSF (ANSI 61) approved for use with potable water and some restrictions do apply in specific applications.

Low VOC and Biodegradable Release Agent

  • All Grifcote products are EPA VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) compliant with less than 250 grams per liter of VOCs. Grifcote is compliant in all 50 States and Canada.

  • All are classified as either readily biodegradable, with a half-life of 28 days or less or inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or less.

  • All products comply with federal or state regulations regarding concrete release agents.

  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete Water Tank posts by Hill and Griffith in Google

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

NPCA extends product-specific certification to water, wastewater tanks 

Why Precast Concrete Cistern pH is Important


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Article review, "The Effects of Concrete Release Agents on the Formwork/Concrete Interface"

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 3, 2019 2:11:59 PM

Fédération Internationale du Béton Proceedings of the 2nd International Congress June 5-8, 2006 – Naples, Italy

Effects of Concrete Release Agents 1

INTRODUCTION

The role of demoulding oils is to prevent the concrete adhering to the steel walls [1]. Because of its extremely fine structure and high lubricity at the very beginning of casting, the cement paste contained in the concrete spreads over the formwork surface and builds up in the asperities. The adhesion of the oil is therefore an important parameter. Another feature of these oils is that they improve the appearance of the facings and the resistance to corrosion of the surfaces of the steel mould and formwork.

This article is by:

Libessart, L., Djelal, C.
Laboratoire d’Artois Mécanique Thermique et Instrumentation, Unviversité d’Artois, TechnoParc Futura – 62400 Béthune, France

De Caro, P.
Laboratoire de Chmie Agro-industriel, UMR1010, INA/INP, ENSIACET, 118 route de Narbonne – 31077 Toulouse Cedex

Dubois, I.
CHRYSO S.A., ZI - 7 rue de l’Europe – 45300 Sermaises

###

Highlights:

Currently the most popular demoulding oils are of mineral origin. However, these products are not very environmentally friendly and cause inconvenience to the users (skin and respiratory tract irritations, inhalation of volatile organic components). Prolonged exposure can inflict irreversible damage recognized as occupational diseases. To resolve these problems, vegetable-based formulations have been developed. A European study [2] was conducted in 1999 to make these agents better known in the building world (SUMOREVA project).

A lack of knowledge of the mechanisms acting at the concrete/wall interface, when demoulding agents are present, means that the formulation of these lubricants remains totally empirical. Manufacturers can but fall back on their experience and site tests which are restrictive and expensive, in order to establish a formulation which best meets users’ requirements.

The aim of this study is to link the physical-chemical properties of mineral or vegetable oil compositions to their mechanical properties when the concrete is laid. Keywords: concrete, release agents, interface, formwork

ESTABLISHING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OILS

The study was conducted on one formulation of mineral origin and one formulation of vegetable origin. The properties of the oils are given in Tab. 1:

The mineral composition comprises a mineral base of paraffin origin. The vegetable composition is formulated from a complex plant ester and an acidifier.

The acid index corresponds to the number of milligrams of potassium (KOH) required to neutralise a gram of oil. In our case, the acid index enables the content to be quantified in COOH carboxylic functions. These functions correspond to free acids, i.e. non saponified. The complex plant esters are prepared by sterification from a fatty acid of plant origin.

Effects of Concrete Release Agents 2

Tab. 1. Properties of the oils

The fatty acids (Fig.1) in contact with an alkaline hydroxide (in this case, lime) are transformed into alkaline carboxylates (soaps). They also catalyse the saponification reaction which generates soaps from an ester and an alkaline hydroxide. In this case, the soap obtained is a calcium salt 2(RCOO)Ca2+. A soap is formed from a long carbonated chain (R) and a carboxylate group (–COO-) called polar head.

 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OIL FILM

The demoulding agent must be chosen in relation to the nature of the formwork and the period of use [4], but it is mainly the conditions of application which are the determining factor. Each time a demoulding agent is used, the formwork surfaces must first be thoroughly cleaned. In addition, the demoulding agent must be applied in a fine and continuous film. It is imperative for the demoulding product to cling to the formwork because if it rides up with the concrete during filling, it may cause flaws and air bubbles. A study conducted by a North American demoulding manufacturer shows that the thicker the oil, the more the surface quality of the concrete deteriorates. According to this study, the best results are obtained with a thickness of 10 μm [5].
 
The optimum quantities for mineral-based oils vary from 0.12 to 0.15 litre per m2 [6] and are about 5 to 10 times lower for vegetable-based oils [7]. This is explained by the fact that in the case of vegetable-based oils, the thinner the film, the better it is organized, and consequently its effectiveness is improved. Excessive oil disorganizes the film and impairs its effectiveness.
 
The most suitable application method is spraying, in some cases together with spreading by rubber scraper to remove the excess oil from the single layer.
 
The quality of the oil film was evaluated on the basis of wettability and under an optical microscope.
 
CONCLUSION
 
The mineral oil studied has low viscosity and a good rheological resistance to temperature variations. Moreover, it also has high wettability. Despite these favorable characteristics, more oil has to be sprayed to obtain an even film on the formwork surface. Vegetable oil has a higher viscosity and lower wettability than mineral oil. In addition, at temperatures of below 20°C, its viscosity increases considerably, and this change is detrimental to the application of the oil under winter conditions. On the other hand, its film offers a homogeneous appearance for a small volume of sprayed oil. The friction of the concrete on the formwork is also reduced for vegetable oil because of an organized soap/oil structure at the interface. It is a combination between a chemical effect (saponification reaction) and a physical effect (thickness of the film) which leads to a significant reduction in the friction stresses.
 

ABSTRACT

Release agents are significant source of pollution in the construction and prefabrication industries. Conventional product are known to be toxic for humans and the environment. New formulations based on vegetable esters have appeared on the market to mitigate against this drawback, but more knowledge must be required about the properties and behaviour of these products, and their industry profile is raised. Understanding the phenomena that occur over formwork-oil-concrete interface is a real challenge. This paper begins with a physicochemical survey of release agents by defining the formwork-oil and oil-concrete interfaces. In then characterizes the formwork-oil-concrete interfaces by dynamic studies (tribometer). Physicochemical mechanisms are proposed.


Precast Structural Concrete Reports from International Federation for Structural Concrete

Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Structures

Practical Design of Structural Concrete

Design of Post-Tensioned Slabs and Foundations


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, International Federation for Structural Concrete

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Apr 25, 2019 4:55:38 PM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Any water that is stationary will eventually become stagnant and undrinkable. How water is stored and its temperature will determine how long the water stays healthy and drinkable. Spring water is often considered as the best water you can drink, store your water in an underground concrete tank and you are producing your own spring water.

Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks
Image from Colorado Precast Concrete.

Why tank water is so acidic

Underground concrete tanks is normally roof harvested rain water, which is naturally acidic. The acidity of normal rain is attributed mainly to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere which gets absorbed as water condenses from a gas to a liquid and it is these liquid droplets that forms clouds and eventually rain. Even in areas that are minimally affected by human pollution, the pH of rain water can range from 4.5 to 5.0 which is fairly acidic.

In built-up areas around cities, above normal acid rain is generally caused by human pollution and in highly polluted cities rain water can become as acidic as lemon juice which causes lots of problems for old historic buildings.

This acidity forms part of the natural process that allows rain water, with the help of microbes found in the soil, to dissolve minerals from the soil into a colloidal form that now makes the water neutral and full of minerals which can then be taken up by plants. Acidic water is however not choosy and will happily do the same thing in the human body. Resulting in the stealing of alkalizing minerals and therefore a net loss of these vital minerals from the body as the water attempts to achieve a more neutral pH balance.

Precast Concrete Potable Water Tanks

Why is concrete the best material to store water in

The very nature of water itself is that it wants to balance out to a neutral pH. and a concrete tank is the only man made storage system that will allow this to happen. To neutralize itself, water will absorb some of the minerals out of the concrete and will generally settle in a slightly alkaline state.

An in-ground concrete water tank will keep the water at the temperature that it fell out of the sky at and if you are in an area that gets mostly winter rain, that cold water will remain cold all summer.

Even above ground, light cannot penetrate through the concrete walls of a concrete and into the water.

All of this become very important, because roof harvested rain water picks up all sorts of dust, bacteria, and bugs and even after being pre-filtered some always gets through.

Water that is alkaline, cold and removed from light will not support the growth of any bacteria that makes its way into your tank, thus allowing this water to stay clean and drinkable for years.

If you cannot put your tank underground, paint it white; or allow ivy to cover it to keep the sun off it and the water will stay very cold.

Yes in time, this leaching of minerals will compromise the integrity of a concrete tank, but a well-made tank is good for a hundred odd years.

(Thanks to Versatile Tanks for this article)


If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete Water Tank posts by Hill and Griffith in Google

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

NPCA extends product-specific certification to water, wastewater tanks 

Why Precast Concrete Cistern pH is Important


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agent, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Review: "Guide for Surface Finish of Formed Concrete"

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 6, 2018 1:05:46 PM

(This week's post is a review of the American Society of Concrete Construction's "Guide for Surface Finish of Formed Concrete." You can read it at Google Books here.)

Amazon Book's summary (April 1, 1999), "Exactly what is a smooth-form finish? What is a rough-form finish? To what extent are bugholes, voids and fins acceptable in each type? This easy-to-use guide explains and illustrates the answers to these questions and, even more importantly, serves as the standard for the differences between as-cast structural concrete finishes. The succinct, yet thorough, text includes a glossary and a handy table on as-cast finishes. But the guide's Presentation Photos are what make it truly unique. Three sets of 6 different, full-scale photographs depict various as-cast finishes, with bugholes and voids ranging from 1/16" or less to 2" across. Attach a Presentation Photo to a bid or specification to show what surface finish is to be expected."

Surface Finish of Formed Concrete.jpg 

 

(Jan 1, 2005 edition from Google Books)

Form Release Agents

Release agents are differentiated from form coatings or sealers that are usually applied in liquid form to contact surfaces either during manufacture or in the field. Coatings and sealers serve one or more of the following purposes:

  • Alter the texture of the contact surface 
  • Improve the durability of the contact surface
  • protect the contact surface from moisture

Release agents, on the other hand, are applied to the contact surface of the forms to prevent bond to the concrete and thus facilitate stripping. They can be applied to form materials during manufacture or applied to the form before each use. Manufacturers' recommendations should be followed in the use of coatings, sealers, and release agents (Reference 10-11), but ACI 347 recommends independent investigation of performance before using a new product.

There is no ACI standard to define these products, but the term form oil is frequently applied to petroleum compounds originally intended for other applications such as diesel fuel or heating oil, while release agent more often refers to products containing proprietary reactive ingredients specifically formulated for use on concrete forms. Release agents are commonly classified on the basis of how they act instead of what is in them. The two basic categories are barrier agents and chemically active agents, sometimes called reactive agents. Some release agents are a combination of the two types.

Barrier type releases agents create a physical barrier between the form surface and the fresh concrete, preventing the concrete from sticking to the form. Familiar examples are home heating oil, diesel oil, and used motor oil. U.S. environmental regulations prohibit the sale of these commodities as release agents, but they have been widely used because they are inexpensive and readily available. They are applied in relatively thick films, covering 200 to 600 sq ft per gallon, and such heavy applications can increase surface staining and bugholes on the concrete surface. If coated forms are left for several days before concrete is placed, barrier oils may evaporate, possibly leading to some sticking of the concrete to the form.

Chemically active or reactive agents contain an active ingredient that may be dissolver in an oil-based carrier or emulsified in a water-based carrier. The active ingredient is typically some type of fatty acid derived from plant or animal sources, and it combines chemically with calcium ions in the fresh concrete. The reaction product is a thin layer of what chemists refer to as a grease or metallic soap or salt; non-water-soluble, it permits the form to release readily from the hardened concrete.

The reactive fatty acid components are generally considered biodegradable and have found favor in the past decade because of increasingly stringent environmental regulations. For similar reasons, manufacturers have also been turning to water-based carriers, which will probably be subject to freezing.

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Gricote, Concrete Form Release Agent

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