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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Do I need to remove concrete release agent from rebar?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 16, 2018 11:20:02 AM

No. A common misunderstanding in the concrete industry is clarified in this review of an article from ForConstructionPros.com.

Question: On several of our most recent projects, the inspector has been complicating our pour schedule when finding form oil over-sprayed on the rebar. Is it our misunderstanding that form oil on rebar shouldn’t pose a problem to the performance or the acceptance of our pre-pour inspection?

Answer: Your question addresses a common problem across the construction industry. Code edition after code edition presents challenges throughout the industry to remain current with the latest acceptable practices. This is a question of appropriate code reference — ACI 332 — rather than ACI 318, and of referencing the most recent version, ACI 332-10, instead of older versions -04 or -08.

Highest quality precast concrete plant -2

Stated in section 4.2.4 of ACI 332-10, the code provides:

"4.2.4 Surface conditions of reinforcement—At the time concrete is placed, deformed bar and welded wire reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to development of bond strength between the reinforcement and the concrete."

"R4.2.4 Common surface contaminants such as concrete splatter, rust, form oil, or other release agents have been found not to be deleterious to bond."

First, during construction, nothing should be found on the reinforcement that would adversely affect the bond strength of the reinforcement in the concrete. Second, what common site conditions found on rebar are not to be considered deleterious to bond. Form oil is a surface contaminant that is not considered deleterious to bond.

Deformed bar and welded wire are designed to achieve a mechanical bond with the concrete rather than a chemical or adhesive bond. The mechanical bond relies on a keying action with the deformations along the length of the reinforcement bar. As long as the surface contaminants do not effectively eliminate the presence of those deformations, they would not be considered deleterious to bond.

ACI 332-10 is available through the bookstore at www.concrete.org.

To read the full article about concrete form oil on rebar go to, "Oil on Rebar."


The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Concrete Form Oil

Article review: "U.S. Skills Gap is Hurting Manufacturing"

Posted by Carlos Gonzalez on Sep 13, 2018 12:51:47 PM

With a growing concern around the nations skills gap, companies look for a root cause. Guest post by Carlos Gonzalez with New Equipment Digest Magazine.

In 2017, the Committee for Economic Development (CED) embarked upon a “listening tour” of business leaders and parents to discuss firsthand information about workplace demands and aspirations for high school graduates. The listening tour made stops in five communities over the course of a year: Oakland, Calif.; Westfield, Mass.; Tupelo, Miss.; Marysville, Ohio; and Norfolk, Va.

Manufacturing is one of the main industries represented in the communities selected for the study and is a field that employs high school graduates without a higher-education degree. CED brought business leaders and parents together to figure out how they could make students ready to enter in-demand fields such as manufacturing, directly out of high school.

Cindy Cisneros, vice president of education programs at CED, explains the methodology of the study and how both parents and business leaders can contribute to career readiness for high school students.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-4

A builder on site discusses work with an apprentice. By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the economy are projected to require postsecondary education and training beyond high school.

How did CED choose the communities for the listening tour?

The five cities were chosen on the basis of achieving a diversity of geography, community demographics, and industry in which to conduct the focus group discussions. CED also drew from its broad network of member partners across the country to help identify sites. Invitations were extended to 10 business leaders who are representative of the regional economy, as well as 10 parents with children of varied age ranges from middle and high school. 

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-2

An engineer teaches his student how to use a TIG welding machine. The skills gap can cost employers up to $23,000 a year per unfilled position.

Why does career readiness matter?

Career readiness has a long and somewhat complicated history in the United States. Following generations of pendulum swings from vocational tracking to college-for-all, recent years have seen an attempt to shift toward a more nuanced approach of preparing students for both college and a career.

Why this shift toward a middle ground? Despite some indications that our education system is improving following decades of standards-based reform, data show that too many young people in America are floundering. In the K-12 system, high school graduation rates are on the rise overall, yet attainment gaps persist: 88% of White students graduate within four years. However, their Black peers graduate at a rate of just 75%, and their Hispanic peers at a rate of 78%.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-3

A construction trainee learns technical skills on the job with her tutor. One report examining middle market companies found that 44% of executives report lacking candidates with the right skills.

Why do these figures matter?

By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the economy are projected to require postsecondary education and training beyond high school (35% at least a Bachelor’s degree, 30% some college or an Associate’s degree). Yet, if the attainment rates mentioned above hold steady, the supply of qualified candidates will fall short. Reports from employers already point to a skills gap, meaning a mismatch between the knowledge and skills of prospective employees and the competencies needed for available jobs.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-1

Two students work together on an engine in mechanical school. A national study found that 77% of employers believe that soft skills are just as important as technical, or hard, skills.

How can parents and business leaders help students develop these soft skills before they enter the workforce?

Both groups brainstormed a number of strategies to help students refine their soft skills while simultaneously strengthening their technical skills. All five communities supported the notion of work-based learning as a key to success. Discussions focused on providing students with opportunities to experience the full continuum, beginning as early as elementary school: awareness, exploration, preparation, and training. For example, the Marysville, Ohio community agreed that they could help school adapt goals to provide exposure to a future work life by allowing businesses to host career fairs and provide internships to high school students.

Implementing these ideas must begin with coordination and communication between parents and the business community, as well as collaboration with schools, in order to give students what they need to find and keep good jobs once they cross the graduation stage and enter the workforce.

(Click here to read the entire article.)

About CED

The Committee for Economic Development of The Conference Board (CED) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, business-led public policy organization that delivers well-researched analysis and reasoned solutions to our nation’s most critical issues.

Since its inception in 1942, CED has addressed national priorities to promote sustained economic growth and development to benefit all Americans. CED’s work in those first few years led to great policy accomplishments, including the Marshall Plan, the economic development program that helped rebuild Europe and maintain the peace; and the Bretton Woods Agreement that established the new global financial system, and both the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.


Precast Concrete In Google News:

Precast concrete could mean better local roads in the future

PCI Mid-Atlantic Producer Awarded Contract with James Madison University

Louisiana DOT testing precast concrete ramp


 Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, U.S. Skills Gap, Concrete Form Release

Review of AWWA Standard for Concrete Potable Water Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe & Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Sep 6, 2018 11:04:40 PM

"The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use."

Concrete Pressure Pipr 101

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

I. Introduction

I.A. Background

There are two types of prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe:

(1) the lined-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder lined with concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped directly on the steel cylinder and coated with mortar; and

(2) the embedded-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder encased in concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped on the exterior concrete surface and coated with cement mortar.

The lined-cylinder type, which was first used in the United States in 1942, is furnished in sizes from 16 in. (410 mm) to 60 in. (1,520 mm). The embedded-cylinder type, which was developed later and first installed in 1953, is most commonly manufactured in sizes 48 in. (1,220 mm) and larger. Both types are designed for the specific combination of internal pressure and external load required for the project in accordance with the procedures outlined in ANSI/AWWA C304, Standard for Design of Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe is used for transmission mains, distribution feeder mains, pressure siphons (including river crossings), penstocks, industrial pressure lines, water intake lines, and other applications. In the manufacture of lined-cylinder pipe, the first step is to fabricate and hydrostatically test the steel cylinder with joint rings attached. The cylinder is then lined with concrete to form the core. The concrete is placed either centrifugally, by vertical casting, or by a radial compaction method. The concrete lining is cured and high-tensile wire is wrapped around the core directly on the steel cylinder. For a selected wire size, the tension and spacing of the wire are controlled to produce a predetermined residual compression in the core to meet design requirements. The wrapped core is then covered with a dense premixed mortar coating applied by a mechanical impact method. In the manufacture of embedded-cylinder pipe, the cylinder and joint rings are constructed and tested in the same manner as lined-cylinder pipe. The cylinder is encased in concrete by vertical casting and mechanical vibration to constitute the core. After curing, the wire reinforcement is wound under tension in one or more layers around the outside of the concrete core containing the cylinder, instead of directly on the cylinder. The exterior coating of premixed mortar is placed by impaction. 

Concrete Pressure Pipe Basics

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

4.6.5 Concrete for pipe core.

4.6.5.1 General. The concrete in the cores may be placed by the centrifugal method, by the vertical casting method, or by other approved methods.

4.6.5.10 Placing concrete by vertical casting method. The concrete lining or core shall be cast on-end on a cast-iron or steel base ring with rigid steel collapsible forms for the concrete surfaces. The forms shall be designed to ensure that they will have smooth contact surfaces, tight joints, and that they will be firmly and accurately held in proper position without distortion during the placing of the concrete. The forms shall be designed to allow the pipe core to be removed without damaging the surfaces of the concrete. The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use.

(Remember that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)

The transporting and placing of concrete shall be carried out by methods that will not cause the separation of concrete materials or the displacement of the steel cylinder or forms from their proper positions. Adequate methods of mechanical vibration shall be used to compact the concrete in the forms and to ensure satisfactory surfaces. 


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Retaining Walls: Designing Better Solutions

Precast Concrete Pavement Slabs: Design and Construction Considerations

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe, Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe, Grifcote LV-50 Plus, Concrete Form Release

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Water Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Water Pipe with Steve Smith

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 30, 2018 11:59:55 PM

This video was produced to show how to select a large diameter water transmission main product, by Steve Smith (Pipe Industry Icon)  

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 1

Hello, my name is Steve Smith and I'm with Forterra Pressure Pipe. What I want to talk to you about today is two pipe products. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which is we're looking at right here. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, what you see here is you can see the prestressing wire. This is six gauge wire, class three. It's got a tensile range of 252,000 to 282,000. You'll notice that the spacing between the wires, that term today is called the pitch, the pitch of the wire, means the space in between rod wrap to rod wrap. For instance, this looks like it could be a one inch pitch. You'll notice the mortar coating. The mortar coating is one inch over top of the cylinder. Okay. What we're gonna transition to now, I want to show you the difference between the prestressed pipe and what known as the bar wrap pipe.

 

 

This is bar wrap pipe. To the naked eye, one might say they look exactly the same. But you're gonna notice this is rod. It's not prestressing wire, it's rod. Wrapped at about 500 psi, and which it's got a heavy steel cylinder, which differs from the prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which only has a 16 gauge cylinder.

Bar wrap pipe is rated typically zero all the way up to 250 psi.

The key difference is bar wrap pipe is a semi-rigid design. Semi-flexible if you will, versus prestress, which is a rigid design. So bar wrap pipe does rely on soil side support, much more important than say prestress. What this demonstrates here is the ability to be able to chip out the mortar coating.

Take the rod wraps and basically cut them and bend them out of your way, and this shows the application where we can actually weld a flange in the field.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 3

What makes bar wrap unique, unlike prestress, is prestress, because of the wire wraps, you basically can't cut this pipe and make any modifications, because the wire is under tension. Where versus this pipe, because the rod is not under tension, this is a steel pipe design, it gives you the ability to cut section, this type of bar wrap pipe. If we go to the other side, I'll show you some other examples.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 2

What you're looking at here is bar wrap pipe. Notice the rod. What this demonstrates is the ability to take say a 20 foot section of bar wrap pipe, you can literally cut the pipe in half. What you see here, we take the rod wraps and just peel a couple rods back, and what this shows the ability to weld a flange in the field, with the butt strap. That's something, quite frankly, that you could not do with the prestress concrete sonar pipe.

So when it comes to adaptability and repair ability in the field, bar wrap has become a favorite choice here in these. This just demonstrates a harness clamp joint. This is a harness style joint that's been around for many, many years. This is one form of restraint joint.

If we go back over here to the left, obviously this demonstrates our snap ring joint. This is snap ring joint. It's a joint, it was a Price Brothers design joint back in the early '70s, 1973. And it's joint ring we still use today.

We jump to the other side, you can see this is the insert. It basically allows the contractor to push the spigot into the bell. You simply tighten down, loosen a nut and tighten down this bolt. And the term we use, now the snap ring is engaged, means it's locked down. That you can see in this cut out section, because it's smaller diameter, how it locks in the spigot ring and keep it from backing out under thrust conditions.

(Thanks to Steve for the great video. Another thing to remember is that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Get Certified - NPCA’s Plant Certification Program assures a uniformly high degree of excellence

Take Your Career to a New Level With Precast University ® and the Master Precaster Program

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Prestressed concrete water pipe, Bar wrapped concrete water pipr, Concrete Form Release

2017 NSF/ANSI Water Treatment and Component Standards

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 26, 2018 11:02:29 AM

A new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added.

Water is, of course, the liquid molecule that we need to sustain life. Any kind of contaminant in water can be detrimental not only to granting this basic need, but it can wickedly and unnecessarily introduce new health problems and even deter individuals from consuming it. Therefore, it is crucial that public water supplies remain clean while supporting a system by which most people in modern society live. (From the American National Standards institute site.)

Drinking Water System Components



NSF/ANSI 61-2017: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects

This American National Standard sets health effects criteria for water system components, specifically the materials or products that come into contact with drinking water, drinking water treatment chemical, or both and can potentially impart chemical contaminants and impurities. System components covered include protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings), joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants), mechanical devices (water meters, valves), pipes, plumbing devices, and process media. Most governmental agencies in North America require compliance with NSF/ANSI 61 for water treatment and distribution products.

NSF/ANSI 61-2017 contains the following revisions: exposure and normalization criteria specific to concrete aggregate have been added, a new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added, language regarding tank covers has been incorporated, allowable volumes of test assemblies have been updated, updated terminology on control samples has been included, lead content requirements have been updated, and updates have been made to several pass/fail values in Annex D on Drinking Water Criteria.


(Warning from  to manufacturers that don't comply with the standard when required. Their blog page.)

The SCAM

ENGINEERS, CONTRACTORS and OWNERS, BEWARE! There are manufacturers out there who continue to try to game the system, but their irresponsibility can easily become YOUR LOSS! Here is an excerpt from the EPA in a summary statement made about the SDWA Section 1417.

Since 1986, the Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA” or “the Act”) has prohibited the use of certain items that are not lead free and since 1996 the Act has made it unlawful for anyone to introduce into commerce items that are not lead free.

ANY MANUFACTURER WHO IS MISLEADING THEIR CUSTOMERS INTO BELIEVING THAT THEIR SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO THE STANDARD IS VIOLATING FEDERAL LAW AS OF JANUARY 4, 2014! There is no nice way to say this! Unfortunately, this irresponsible behavior has become commonplace within the industry as there have been many manufacturers who have put off certification believing the enforcement would be low.

I spoke with our third party lab regarding the testing of components and systems and this is what they said:

Manufacturers can request the testing and certification of either a component or system. If a client chooses to only certify a component, then only the component can be labeled and advertised as certified.

To clarify, standard NSF/ANSI 61 addresses several different types of potential contaminants, but not specifically lead content. Low lead requirements are defined separately in three different requirements:

• Federal lead law: “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” – Effective January 4, 2014
• California lead law: “The California health & Safety Code 116875”
• NSF/ANSI 372: Standard, not a law, providing test methods.
It is important to note that having compliance to NSF/ANSI 372 does not substitute certification to either the Federal or CA State lead laws.

If a manufacturer has a SYSTEM certification, this will be obvious to the user if they look at the certification document provided by the test laboratory. The QuantumFlo Certification is, without question, perfectly clear.


72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe.

Ameron supplied this 72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe (CCP) consists of a steel cylinder lined with concrete or cement mortar, then helically wrapped with a mild steel bar and coated with dense cement mortar. CCP is designed and manufactured in accordance with the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standard C303 and AWWA Manual M9, and is normally supplied in standard diameters of 18 to 72 inches for operating pressures up to 400 psi. Pipe has been manufactured in larger sizes and for higher pressures based on the concepts of this standard.


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Louisiana DOT testing precast concrete ramp

New Precast Concrete Educational Courses Highlight Innovative Technologies

Precast concrete barn has all the bells and whistles for 280 Alberta dairy cattle


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Form Release

Protect Your Precast Forms with Reactive Release Agents and Rust Preventatives

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 18, 2018 8:17:40 PM

Taking care of your precast concrete forms extends their life and protects a valuable investment.

Precast-Concrete-Careers-6

It starts with day-to-day mainentance. Steel form problems can happen with poor cleaning or excessive use of wire brushes or sandblasting. They can also be damaged by vibrators.

The selection of a good concrete release agent is another important aspect of form care. There are two main types of concrete releases.



Diesel fuel, greases, used motor oil, etc. barrier type products provide a barrier between the form and the concree allowing it to strip. These provided a good release, but cause surface voids, staining, and over all poor finished appearance. They are harder to apply due to their higher viscosity.

precast-concrete-form-maintenance-1

Reactive type are chemically active and contain compounds that react with the free lime in the concrete to produce a soap-like film between the form and the concrete. This type of release agent is the most widely used. They are only require a thin film to produce a stain-free, void-free concrete surfaces. Reactive type release allow the form to strip cleaner.

Proper application of release agents is necessary for economy and for producing the best product possible and for minimizing form clean up.

Another aspect of concrete form care is protection in storage when they are out of service between jobs. The forms need to be protected from rust and corrosion. Some use grease, diesel fuel, or release agent but a rust preventative is a beter choice. For your rust preentative know the quality of protection, length of protection, ease of application, and ease to remove.

Formwork is a big investment for producers. Proper care insures product quality and extends their life. It will make your concrete business more profitable.


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Precast concrete could mean better local roads in the future

Precast concrete barn has all the bells and whistles for 280 Alberta dairy cattle

Senior Living Community Selects Precast Concrete for New Construction


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Form Seasoning, Concrete Casting Supplies, Rust Inhibitors, Concrete Form Release

Automated Block Casting, Concrete Release Agent Application

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 11, 2018 2:24:32 PM

Video Review of an automated machine for forming retaining wall blocks which shows the application of the concrete release agent to the form.
 
This week's post comes from a video produced by CGM Machines and Moulds for Concrete Products
  • CGM block making machines are designed to make vibro-pressed hollow blocks, interlocking blocks, pavers, a variety of special products and custom made-designs.
  • CGM interchangeable moulds are designed to meet any customers’ need and specifications.
  • CGM Block Machines are easy to use, reliable and with a high production capacity.
  • CGM block machines produce high quality products with international standards, drastically cutting down labour costs.

Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-2.jpg

Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-2a.jpg
 
 
Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-6.jpg
 
Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-7.jpeg
 
Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-8.jpg
 
Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-9.jpg
 
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Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-13.jpg

Precast Concrete in Google News

Tindall Produces Precast to Blend with the Blue Ridge Mountains

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release, Concrete Release Agents, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Supplies

The Inquisitive Mind: Jodi Zwart, Master Precaster

Posted by Mason Nichols on Dec 21, 2017 7:19:27 PM

 

Jodi Zwart’s love of learning offers unlimited potential to Woodard’s Concrete Products.


Take Your Career to a New Level With Precast University ® and the Master Concrete Precaster Program

NPCA’s program will help position you for continued career advancement in the precast industry. Offered as part of NPCA’s Precast University, the program includes precast-specific training with comprehensive education courses for production, safety, technical, quality control and leadership. Developed in conjunction with industry experts, producers, departments of transportation and academia, the Precast University curriculum is a perfect complement to employees new to the industry needing a broad knowledge base and to those employees with precast experience who want to take the next step in their careers. For more information on Precast University and the Master Precaster program, download our brochure.

Precast Concrete in Google News

Tindall Produces Precast to Blend with the Blue Ridge Mountains

Tindall Team's Leadership Transitions with New CEO and Chairman


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Master Precaster, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Release Agents

Concrete Form Release Selection

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 14, 2017 10:12:13 PM

 

Industry-Leading Performance and Quality Release Agents


Precast Concrete in Google News

Precast Construction Market Volume Analysis, size, share and Key Trends 2016 – 2024

Smith-Midland continues sound wall success in Loudoun County, Virginia


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, FR-50

Concrete Form Release Definitions

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 7, 2017 3:12:18 PM

 

From Wikipedia

Barrier release agents prevent adhesion by the development of a physical film or barrier between the forming surface and the concrete.

Reactive release agents are chemically active and work by the process of a chemical reaction between the release agent and the free limes available in fresh concrete. A soapy film is created which prevents adhesion. Because it is a chemically reactive process, there is generally little to no residue or unreacted product left on the forming surface or concrete which provides for a cleaner process.

Water-based release agents are a result of more focus on health, environment and safety issues. This has resulted in development of new technologies largely focused on water-based formulations, with the movement being away from petroleum- or solvent-based products.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 1 copy.jpg


How Safe (and Legal) is Your Form Release Agent?, Excerpt from Precast Inc. article

By Bob Waterloo

Become familiar with the safety standards and regulations to help protect your workers, plant and environment.

My grandfather used to show me a trick: He would strike a match and throw it into a pail of gasoline. (I do not suggest that anyone attempt this “trick.”) Because the oxygen supply was so quickly diminished, nothing happened except for the match going out. Does that mean gasoline is “safe”? Not by a long shot.

We can also make some comparisons with concrete release agents. Safety rules, both from an employee and environmental perspective, must be observed carefully to ensure we are not dealing with materials that are harmful, or potentially harmful, to our employees and environment.

Environmental safety
The vast majority of concrete form release agents use a petroleum solvent as the carrying agent. In reactive form release agents, the amount of reactive material added is relatively small – usually less than 10%. While the reactive portion is usually biodegradable (“environmentally friendly” or “readily biodegradable”), the carrying agents are normally less so.

The first assumption is to question why the material is being introduced to the environment instead of being applied to the concrete forms. Over-application of form release agents is very common in the precast industry and eventually some of this overspray ends up on the floor, ultimately washes off and contaminates the outside ground. Water run-off analyses will determine if you are contaminating the environment and perhaps ground and sub-surface water. While over-application is a waste of money and encourages bug holes and staining, we need to also educate our workers that “thinner is better” to help avoid ground contamination, reduce our costs (no matter how little) and have better-looking castings.

A second area of concern regarding the environment is Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in form release agents. Federal Regulations for allowable levels of VOCs have been in effect since September 1999. Since then, individual states have enacted legislation reducing the allowable levels of VOCs from the federal level of 450 g/L to a maximum of 250 g/L.

As local, state and provincial regulations are sometimes more stringent than federal regulations, you should check with your local authorities as to what requirements are in place for your area.

Potable (drinking) water
If you are producing castings that will be exposed to potable (drinking) water, a form release should meet the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 61 requirements. The intent is to establish standards and certify that the end product exposures are acceptable for human consumption. Very few release agents are ANSI 61 approved due to stringent tests that are conducted on the product. The tests include plant and quality certification, along with tests on the form release. It is not an inexpensive procedure, and recertification is handled on an annual basis.

Bob Waterloo is technical sales manager, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Indianapolis. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com or visit the Hill and Griffith website at www.grifcote.com. 

Concrete Form Release


Biodegradable, NSF Release Agents Offer A Range Of Options For Concrete Applications

National Sanitation Foundation (NSF/ANSI 61) certified companies now have more options for the type of concrete release agents they use during their construction projects. The Hill and Griffith Company offers the concrete industry readily biodegradable release agents that are VOC- compliant and NSF-certified. Multiple reactive technologies create a metallic soap that reduces bonding/adhesion, while promoting quick, clean stripping at the same time deterring build-up on forms and pallets.

Hill and Griffith produces concrete form release agents that are classified as either “Readily Biodegradable” or “Inherently Biodegradable,” based on OECD 301-B. Since the release agents are readily or inherently biodegradable, the environmental impact is lessened. (Precasters should check local regulations for specifics pertaining to their operation). Contractors have noticed cleaner releases, better-looking castings as well as minimized employee safety concerns. GRIFCOTE® products are widely used on precast, prestressed and poured-in-place applications among others.
The Hill and Griffith Company, headquartered in Cincinnati, has created an entire family of specialized concrete form release agents and form seasoning agents with the knowledge of what customers need and an eye on the future. For nearly 115 years, The Hill and Griffith Company has been a trusted provider of raw materials and technical expertise to the metal casting, concrete and hydraulic fluids industries.

In 1896 when John Hill founded the Hill and Griffith Company, the concept of quality was adopted. He stated, “Hill and Griffith feels that the integrity of the company must be represented in the products and services bearing our names and labels.” Today, this tradition lives on. 

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release

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