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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Coating Tilt Up Concrete Walls

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Oct 24, 2019 3:55:17 PM

Originally published in the March 2011 issue of Concrete Construction

Q: The painted surfaces of some of the tilt-up concrete walls on our projects seem to develop blisters, peeling, or flaking shortly after application. Sometimes this occurs after it rains. Is there anything different about tilt-up walls that makes this happen?

A: As with any paint or coating project, the key to good results is paying attention to the three Ps: Prep, Prime, and Paint. Procedures for painting and coating concrete surfaces are different from other surfaces, and tilt-up concrete surfaces do require special preparation.

Causes of Defects on Tilt Up Concrete Walls

Surface Preparation: The most likely reason for blistering and peeling in a tilt-up wall, especially if it occurs shortly after it rains, is failure to remove the mold release agents and bond breakers used for casting the concrete component.

This is the big difference between tilt-up concrete and other forms: It is cast on the jobsite in concrete forms. After the concrete wall or column has cured, a mobile crane tilts the piece up and moves it into place, where it is braced into position and secured. Painting contractors may not always be fully aware of this because they arrive on the jobsite after the walls are in place.

To prevent the concrete from adhering to the molds, contractors apply release agents, or bond breakers, to the mold before the concrete is poured. These release agents can be solvent-based, water-based, oil-based, silicone-based, silicone-free, silicone water-based and many other proprietary combinations. But they all perform the same function—they create lower surface energy between the concrete form and the concrete to mitigate adhesion. The objective is to be able to lift the cured concrete from the casting mold smoothly and cleanly.

Unfortunately, release agent residue also can inhibit adhesion of coatings and paint to the concrete surface. Most painting contractors are aware of this, and paint companies do a good job of educating painters about the need to remove release agent residue before painting or coating tilt-up concrete surfaces. Power washing at the specified pressure using the specified cleaning solvent should do the trick, but there are two cautions.

One, be methodical and thorough when power washing. Two, there is a trend toward making release agents and paints/coatings more compatible, but it is always prudent to power wash the surface first. Even with “compatible” release agents, if too much was applied to one area, it could swamp the system and adversely affect coating adhesion.

All concrete surfaces must be washed before coating to remove dirt, dust, and excess sand anyway, so always take the extra step of power washing tilt-up concrete to remove any release agent residue, whether they are compatible or not.

Read More


Additional news from Concrete Construction

Repairing Bugholes

Concrete Form Maintenance


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Pipe, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Grifcote FR 50 Concrete Form Release, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Concrete Construction Magazine

5 Options for Dry-Cast Concrete Pipe Dip Tank Maintenance

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Oct 10, 2019 2:24:06 PM

Originally published in the May-June issue of 2015 PRECAST INC, by Bob Waterloo

Maintaining the optimum reactive level of form release agents in pipe production dip tanks ensures performance and quality. 

Dip tanks play a critical role in the dry-cast pipe production process for many manufacturers. The reactive properties of the fatty acids in the form release agent enable the pipe to release from the pallet/header smoothly. Here’s the problem. The cement/concrete residue left behind when headers are dipped starts to negate the reactive properties of the fatty acids.

Left unchecked, the form release agent eventually begins to lose its effectiveness, pipes will not pull easily from the headers and quality could suffer. The solution: implement a regular program of monitoring and maintenance that keeps the form release at the optimum reactive release level and reduces replacement and disposal costs.

Precast Pipe Dip Tank Maintenance

Benefits of a dip tank
Reactive form release agents are the accepted standard in today’s precast and pipe-forming operations. Fatty acids, which are found in an infinite number of blends, are the most commonly used reactive material. Fatty acids have the unique ability to react with the free lime on the surface of the concrete, which results in a nonviolent chemical reaction. This neutralization (or saponification) forms a metallic soap, allowing the product to release easily.

There are several benefits to using a dip tank to apply form release during pipe-forming operations, including complete coverage, proper release and reduced chance of operator error. However, a common occurrence when using this method of manufacturing is increasing difficulty with “pulls” or “tip-outs” during stripping over a period of production time. This is generally the result of decreased reactive material in the dip tank as contaminants enter the system and negate some of the reactive material.

Maintaining the dip tank
Two areas must be addressed in the preventive maintenance program for this type of equipment:

  1. Regular maintenance to remove sludge that accumulates in the bottom of the dip tank
  2. Regular maintenance of the release agent’s reactive levels for effective release

The sludge generated in the dip tank includes contaminants from previously dipped headers/joint rings. These contaminants negate the reactive portion of the form release. As the reactive portion of the release agent gradually decreases, the possibility of concrete sticking to the headers increases, causing a more difficult release. The rate of decrease is gradual and depends on many factors, including rate of production and amount of contaminants allowed to enter the dip tank.

Ring-Oiling

Removing contaminants
Rather than disposing of the entire tank of form release, transfer it to a holding tank and shovel out the sludge. Because the sludge typically contains petroleum hydrocarbons, disposal should be in compliance with local regulations. Then, transfer the recovered form release agent back into the dip tank and top it off with fresh release agent.

Remember that by adding fresh release agent to the recovered material, rather than using all new release agent, reactive levels will be reduced and release problems will occur sooner unless the reactive portion is tested and brought back to a normal level. The discoloration of the recovered material from the dip tank is not relevant to the release characteristics, or levels of reactive material.

Maintaining reactive release levels
Maintaining the correct level of reactive agent in the form release is quite simple. Test the recovered material and bring the reactive portion back to optimum levels.

Test a sample from the dip tank (less than one ounce is sufficient) for the reactive level through either titration or infrared analysis. Your release agent supplier should be able to tell you the optimum level of reactive material required and may be able to run the analysis for you. Once you determine the level of fatty acids, a number of simple calculations determine the amount of pure reactive agent to be added to the dip tank to bring it back to the optimum reactive level.

After adding the recommended amount of reactive material to the dip tank, use an air lance for mixing for a minimum of two minutes, making sure to cover the entire area of the dip tank. Then top off the dip tank with fresh release agent and air lance again for good distribution.

Depending on the amount of contaminants and reduced reactive material, the timeframe between tests will vary. One way to determine the frequency between tests is to establish a baseline. Begin with tests every 30 days, which should be recorded, until a history can be compiled to determine the needed frequency. The normal frequency of adding more reactive ingredients is typically five gallons for every six weeks of regular production.

In many cases, production workers can see the reduced effectiveness of release agents. It’s important to train them to notify management to add additional reactive material to the dip tank. As usual, science is best, but practical application and analysis are also important.

Total replacement of form release
While removing sludge and maintaining dip tanks by adding new release as needed make sense from an environmental and cost perspective, on occasion, you may feel it necessary to clean the entire dip tank to remove all residual sludge and refill the cleaned dip tank with fresh release agent.

Cost-effectiveness
Dip tank maintenance comes down to five options. Option 1 is the least cost-effective, while Option 5 is the most cost-effective.

Option 1: Drain the dip tank, dispose of the sludge and old release material, then refill only with fresh form release agent.
Option 2: Remove the form release from the dip tank, dispose of the sludge, refill the dip tank with fresh form release, then use the recovered form release to replenish the dip tank as necessary.
Option 3: Remove the form release from the dip tank, dispose of the sludge, refill the tank with recovered form release, then top off with fresh form release.
Option 4: Remove the form release from dip tank, dispose of the sludge, test the recovered form release, add reactive ingredient to bring it back to an optimum level, then top off with fresh form release.
Option 5: If there is not enough sludge to remove but the release is not as good as it should be, test for the reactive level of the release agent in the tank, then add reactive material to return it to an optimum level.

In the long run, a little care and attention to the reactive content level in the dip tank will help to reduce labor costs and maintain or improve casting appearance.


Additional news from PRECAST INC

Evaluating and Diagnosing Unformed Surface Imperfections

One Thing: Concrete Consolidation


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Pipe, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Grifcote FR 50 Concrete Form Release, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Inc Magazine

Preventing Bug Holes in Precast Concrete

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Sep 26, 2019 4:40:25 PM

From the June 2, 2014 PRECAST Magazine post Causes and Fixes for SCC Bug Holes, by John Pelicone

bugholes_th.jpgLike a persistent mosquito, one question has plagued precast concrete producers for years: “How can I eliminate bug holes?” In the past, this question was much harder to answer, because concrete was placed at a stiffer consistency that required excessive vibration. And excessive vibration sometimes caused more bug holes. After the introduction of self-consolidating concrete (SCC), bug holes(ii) became a less common occurrence. Yet, as a recent online industry discussion revealed, this perturbing problem is still with us.

"Two types of release agents

  1. Chemically reactive agents: When a chemically reactive form release agent is used, a nonviolent chemical reaction takes place when fatty acids react with free lime on the surface of fresh concrete. This reaction results in the formation of a metallic soap, a slippery material that allows air bubbles to rise along the vertical surface. This “soapy” film also prevents the hardened concrete from adhering to the forms during stripping.
  2. Barrier release agents: Thicker coatings on forms are typical of the older barrier-type materials, like heavyweight used motor oil, vegetable oils, diesel fuel and kerosene. Barrier type release agents are less expensive than chemically reactive agents, but they are not generally recommended for reducing SCC bug holes."

SCC-Bug-Holes-1

Read More

In summary,

"Bug Hole voids are formed during placement. Small pockets of air or water are trapped against the form. The problem increases with the height of the lift. Vibration may not be adequate or well spaced. The mix may be sticky.

  • Primarily caused by the way concrete is placed and compacted
  • Entrapped air not removed by vibration, air bubbles move to the form
  • Improper application of Form Release agent or wrong type 

SOLUTION I PREVENTION: Avoiding Bug Holes

  • Work the voids at the form face up and out of each lift
  • Let the vibrator drop through the lift, then vibrate upward
  • Don't overvibrate at the center of the wall
  • Move the vibrator as close to the form as possible
  • Add upward external vibration if necessary
  • Reduce the height of each lift to make void removal easier
  • Aggregate - consult ready mix producer and review aggregate size and shape
  • Reduce sand content
  • Use low slump concrete"

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Grifcote FR 50 Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release for Wood, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Inc Magazine

12 Advantages of Large Scale Construction Precast Concrete

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 7, 2019 8:46:27 PM

Large-scale construction is a beast in a class of its own, and precast concrete is able to slay almost all of the worries it conjures up.

Traditional concrete building construction is fading away as more construction crews, planners and architects discover the precast concrete advantages.

Here are just 12 of the advantages of precast concrete strength and uniformity. They touch every aspect of building construction from how high you can go to making the final installation of plumbing, electrical, HVAC and other elements significantly easier.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-2.jpg

1. STRUCTURALLY SECURE AND EFFICIENT
Traditional concrete building construction just can’t stand up to the precast concrete advantages and strength, especially when looking at large projects.

This post is from Nitterhouse Concrete Products2655 Molly Pitcher Hwy., Chambersburg, PA 17202


Precast concrete is specifically designed and constructed to have a significantly high span-to-depth ratio that allows it to bear loads better, reducing the need for additional columns and supports within the internal structure of the building. Its lighter weight can also reduce the size of needed structural material and overall foundational depth.

Precast concrete strength isn’t sacrificed by its lightweight construction, though, which means it’ll stay secure and even be put under reduced dead loads when properly installed. All of that weight savings paired with high strength means buildings can use precast concrete to reach heights of up to 80 stories.

Precast concrete strength isn’t sacrificed by its lightweight construction, though, which means it’ll stay secure and even be put under reduced dead loads when properly installed. All of that weight savings paired with high strength means buildings can use precast concrete to reach heights of up to 80 stories.

The NCPA’s guide to precast concrete says that, compared to traditional concrete building construction, precast concrete can reduce floor depths by up to four inches. So, this savings on a 60-story building will reduce the overall height by an average of two stories’ worth, or 20 feet.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-2-1.jpg

All of that precast concrete uniformity means it is a denser construction that can reduce vibrations that move throughout the building. So for large-scale projects, especially those with open areas like concert halls, vibration in seats and stands is reduced to help increase enjoyment and minimize the risk of structural damage from large crowds.

These elements combine to make precast concrete an extremely safe building material that can help your construction crew meet the safety requirements for projects of almost any size and shape.

2. PREFABRICATED AND PREINSTALLED
Tilt-up concrete construction requires pouring and molding onsite limits what you can use it for when it comes to internal structures and foundations, as well as when your job requires significant utility access. For example, an airport has a vast array of technology that must always be operable, but it can’t have wires or other overhangs that move across its yard. This means everything possible runs through the foundation and base of the buildings.

Precast concrete allows construction teams to preinstall utility access, fixtures and other elements. Some of the more common inclusions are plumbing and communication lines, though the NPCA notes that preinstalled elements can even include windows.

During and after the precast concrete is made and molded, different utility panels can be added and installed. This allows construction crews to ensure there is access to utilities and other elements right away, so there’s less need for revisions or alteration of the concrete.

Larger elements can also be checked by electricians, plumbers and other specialized professionals before those blocks and units are installed. Crews only need to worry about connecting each unit and then performing a final test because each piece will be operational as it arrives.

Pre-installation of elements is a top way that precast concrete can save construction companies money and help them deliver projects on time, or even early — which is a significant way to boost a reputation.

3. WEATHER AND LARGE-SCALE PRECAST CONCRETE
Precast concrete is able to withstand flood damage, wind-blown debris, rain penetration and the methods we use to protect buildings and roads from these dangers. Studies have found that it can withstand many freeze-thaw cycles even better than other construction and building materials, so it won’t decay or crumble as it expands and contracts.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-5.jpg

Precast concrete’s strength and uniformity allow it to withstand these elemental changes more successfully than traditional concrete building construction.

4. THERMAL FRIENDLY
Large-scale infrastructure requirements create unique weather and element demands, including the ability to keep heat in during the cold months and keep heat out in the summer. When you’re not using the right materials, you’re looking at a significantly increased cost all year long.

Precast concrete advantages for the building owners are big, but many believe it’s thermal efficiency that’s among the most cost advantageous. Precast concrete is denser and less of a thermal conductor, so it doesn’t move heat around your building. That means you’ll reduce peak heating and cooling loads — this type of concrete is slow to react and easier to heat or cool relative to external and temperatures.

5. FIRE TOUGH
Precast concrete is fireproof when properly constructed and combined with the right insulation and paneling on walls and ceilings — it can limit a fire’s ability to spread between rooms.

Precast concrete itself also doesn’t catch fire, won’t burn and typically does not drip or melt unless there is a special additive layered on top or introduced into its construction.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-3.jpg

Using precast concrete for all of the walls in a stairwell means the people inside will be protected, and the construction of your building can limit any harm or loss of life in the event of a future emergency.

And if there is a fire, the precast concrete strength and uniformity prevent it from major damage. In most cases, the building owner will need to replace paneling but not the concrete underneath. The damage would be mostly cosmetic, not foundational, and in areas like floors or ceilings, there may only be the need to perform a little cleaning and apply a new coat of pain.

6. RESISTANT TO CHEMICALS AND RUST
Rounding out the elemental protections of precast concrete is a high resistance to chemical exposures and rust. It has become a common material for docks, bridges, overpasses and more because interlocked precast concrete blocks maintain their resistance to oil and fuel spills. They don’t suffer significant harm and if a panel is damaged due to a chemical spill. It’s also much easier to replace with minimal impact to the overall structural integrity.

Precast concrete that’s exposed to rain and water is also less likely to rust than traditional concrete building construction as well. Internal rebar isn’t exposed as often due to the high strength of precast concrete, so it is a top choice for marinas and other locations on the water. Precast concrete is also resistant to many of the microbes common in our waterways, so there’s less decay that could possibly wind up exposing the internal steel.

7. TOUGH JOBS EVERY SINGLE DAY
Precast concrete’s chief advantage is that it can withstand the daily tasks of use without problem for years and years. Precast concrete’s strength allows it to support buildings, parking structures and other elements where there is significant everyday wear and tear. Its internal structure is resistant to dents, dings, chips and other damage that can come from slight bumps.

Precast concrete doesn’t bruise or wilt when it comes to a little punishment.

8. REDUCE NOISE INSIDE AND OUT
Precast concrete is incredibly dense, and the process used to create it makes it denser and more resilient than other concrete options. This density is why it is used in many walls and privacy construction elements for large-scale construction as well as sound walls around communities that may face a highway.

Precast concrete’s density effectively reduces sound and creates a privacy zone when it is used as a barrier in large-scale construction projects. This makes it a perfect option for both residential and commercial jobs.

The ability to deflect or absorb sound also makes precast concrete a smart acoustic material. For example, bounce away the road noise outside, while reflecting internal noise back toward the project’s center so your customers enjoy things like conversation and music inside their homes.

9. WI-FI FRIENDLY
Even the largest industrial construction project needs to account for the Wi-Fi and RF demands of the end customer. The great news is that precast concrete is actually relatively Wi-Fi friendly and may be more compatible with the wireless networking than other types of concrete — or other building materials.

Precast concrete allows more radio signals, Wi-Fi and other Internet networks to pass through more floors or walls, expanding support and limiting the cost the building owner or renter will need to expend to connect their entire office or store.

This is one of the chief reasons precast concrete has started to show up in schools, homes, office parks, hotels, restaurants and small stores.

10. KEEP PESTS OUT
Another reason you’ll see precast concrete in all of those locations is because it can be a deterrent to pests like rats, mice and termites. The precast concrete density is a big boost for keeping these nuisances away.

The precast concrete advantages extend to pest control because it is not an organic building material. Organics such as wood are able to be chewed through by most vermin — and are the food itself for some bugs — which makes a building the perfect spot for the animals to live.

Your standard construction that uses organic materials ends up being a shelter from the elements for the pests as well as the people, which ruins the atmosphere and sometimes the safety of that location.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-4.jpg

11. SAFETY AND LARGE-SCALE INFRASTRUCTURE DEMANDS
In today’s world, we need to protect against a wide variety of threats, both from nature and from people. Precast concrete can assist in both of those areas.

Precast concrete strength adds a level of security that can prevent both break-ins and break-outs if your construction project is a high-value target from a corporate headquarters to a facility like a prison. Precast concrete resists most impacts and penetration attempts.

Attacks have happened at locations of all sorts, and precast concrete may add an extra layer of security to prevent collateral damage, harm from stray bullets and other manmade concerns.

On the natural side of things, precast concrete has become a default material for creating storm shelters, whether you’re trying to resist a tornado or a hurricane. Some precast concrete solutions on the market — typically small and made for residences — are even rated to survive F-5 tornadoes.

For your larger construction project, that means precast concrete will deliver a safer product that can withstand the rains and wind that are common all across the United States. You might not be able to ensure safety during the strongest of winds based solely on the use of precast concrete, but you can ensure employees sheltering in place have all the added protection that could be provided.

12. CUSTOMIZABLE FOR YOUR JOB
Large-scale infrastructure demands usually include a unique look and feel for the building in order for it to stand out and fit the nature of the company paying for its construction. This allows precast concrete to shine, from small unique locations to custom large-scale construction because it can be made into nearly any shape.

Precast construction is built with molds and forms, which are manufactured in all kinds of curves, bends, angles and odd designs. By working with a manufacturer during the planning stage, a construction project can turn to precast concrete for every aspect of a building, from core and foundational elements to the sound barriers, bridges and other secondary structures.

Custom molds allow even the largest-scale construction projects to have a custom element, and the use of master molds can allow for variance so a project has an appealing design that moves with the land. It’s not limited by curves or straight lines, and it can be designed and molded to match existing infrastructure. The molding process allows precast concrete to have the same shapes and patterns as any nearby location — even historical stone buildings or famous bricks.

Advantages-of-Precast-Concrete-1.jpg

Those are just twelve of the many major precast concrete advantages. They may not all apply to your large-scale construction project, but we encourage you to reach out and contact us or ask your questions below to see what benefits you can achieve.

Precast concrete can meet many other large-scale infrastructure demands better than traditional concrete building construction. Our experts are on hand to help you discover what precast concrete products can deliver for your next project no matter what building type you’re working on, or how large of a project your plans are becoming.

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Water Based Concrete Form Release, Precast Concrete Buildings, Concrete Casting Technical Support, Precast Concrete Careers

Do I need to remove concrete release agent from rebar?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 16, 2018 11:20:02 AM

No. A common misunderstanding in the concrete industry is clarified in this review of an article from ForConstructionPros.com.

Question: On several of our most recent projects, the inspector has been complicating our pour schedule when finding form oil over-sprayed on the rebar. Is it our misunderstanding that form oil on rebar shouldn’t pose a problem to the performance or the acceptance of our pre-pour inspection?

Answer: Your question addresses a common problem across the construction industry. Code edition after code edition presents challenges throughout the industry to remain current with the latest acceptable practices. This is a question of appropriate code reference — ACI 332 — rather than ACI 318, and of referencing the most recent version, ACI 332-10, instead of older versions -04 or -08.

Highest quality precast concrete plant -2

Stated in section 4.2.4 of ACI 332-10, the code provides:

"4.2.4 Surface conditions of reinforcement—At the time concrete is placed, deformed bar and welded wire reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to development of bond strength between the reinforcement and the concrete."

"R4.2.4 Common surface contaminants such as concrete splatter, rust, form oil, or other release agents have been found not to be deleterious to bond."

First, during construction, nothing should be found on the reinforcement that would adversely affect the bond strength of the reinforcement in the concrete. Second, what common site conditions found on rebar are not to be considered deleterious to bond. Form oil is a surface contaminant that is not considered deleterious to bond.

Deformed bar and welded wire are designed to achieve a mechanical bond with the concrete rather than a chemical or adhesive bond. The mechanical bond relies on a keying action with the deformations along the length of the reinforcement bar. As long as the surface contaminants do not effectively eliminate the presence of those deformations, they would not be considered deleterious to bond.

ACI 332-10 is available through the bookstore at www.concrete.org.

To read the full article about concrete form oil on rebar go to, "Oil on Rebar."


The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Concrete Form Oil

The Precast Show 2019 is already at 96% capacity!

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 2, 2018 9:41:46 PM

Come join us February 28 – March 2, 2019 in Louisville, Kentucky for the next Precast Show.

Precast Show Logo
 
To view the floor plan and current exhibitor list CLICK HERE. For a snapshot of the last show directory from the Denver 2018 Show CLICK HERE.  As always, contact me if you have questions. We look forward to a successful venue in Louisville!!

Regards, Brenda C. Ibitz, Vice President of Development; National Precast Concrete Association, 1320 City Center Drive, Suite 200, Carmel, Indiana 46032; (800) 366-7731, (317) 571-9500 (phone), (317) 571-0041 (fax), bibitz@precast.org
 

The Hill and Griffith Company Precast Show Booth 2018
 
Mike Lawry, VP Sales & Operations; Bob Waterloo, Director of Distribution; Angela Cox, Technical Representative; Tom Dempsey, Technical Representative; and Barry Morgan, Technical Representative.
 
 
Transcription of the video, "Welcome to The Hill and Griffith Company booth at the 2018 Precast Concrete Show. They're featuring their  Grifcoat and Cast-O-Magic Concrete Form Releases with their "The Perfect Release" theme. The Hill and Griffith Company is one of the largest suppliers of concrete form releases in North America. With its brands of both barrier, and reactive types of form releases that create a metallic soap release that is excellent for controlling bug holes. The show will be open again tomorrow, so we'll see you on Friday at The Hill and Griffith Company booth, Denver Colorado."

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, Precast Show, Grifcote, Cast-O-Magic

Concrete Form Release Selection

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 14, 2017 10:12:13 PM

 

Industry-Leading Performance and Quality Release Agents


Precast Concrete in Google News

Precast Construction Market Volume Analysis, size, share and Key Trends 2016 – 2024

Smith-Midland continues sound wall success in Loudoun County, Virginia


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

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On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release, FR-50

Concrete Form Release Definitions

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 7, 2017 3:12:18 PM

 

From Wikipedia

Barrier release agents prevent adhesion by the development of a physical film or barrier between the forming surface and the concrete.

Reactive release agents are chemically active and work by the process of a chemical reaction between the release agent and the free limes available in fresh concrete. A soapy film is created which prevents adhesion. Because it is a chemically reactive process, there is generally little to no residue or unreacted product left on the forming surface or concrete which provides for a cleaner process.

Water-based release agents are a result of more focus on health, environment and safety issues. This has resulted in development of new technologies largely focused on water-based formulations, with the movement being away from petroleum- or solvent-based products.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 1 copy.jpg


How Safe (and Legal) is Your Form Release Agent?, Excerpt from Precast Inc. article

By Bob Waterloo

Become familiar with the safety standards and regulations to help protect your workers, plant and environment.

My grandfather used to show me a trick: He would strike a match and throw it into a pail of gasoline. (I do not suggest that anyone attempt this “trick.”) Because the oxygen supply was so quickly diminished, nothing happened except for the match going out. Does that mean gasoline is “safe”? Not by a long shot.

We can also make some comparisons with concrete release agents. Safety rules, both from an employee and environmental perspective, must be observed carefully to ensure we are not dealing with materials that are harmful, or potentially harmful, to our employees and environment.

Environmental safety
The vast majority of concrete form release agents use a petroleum solvent as the carrying agent. In reactive form release agents, the amount of reactive material added is relatively small – usually less than 10%. While the reactive portion is usually biodegradable (“environmentally friendly” or “readily biodegradable”), the carrying agents are normally less so.

The first assumption is to question why the material is being introduced to the environment instead of being applied to the concrete forms. Over-application of form release agents is very common in the precast industry and eventually some of this overspray ends up on the floor, ultimately washes off and contaminates the outside ground. Water run-off analyses will determine if you are contaminating the environment and perhaps ground and sub-surface water. While over-application is a waste of money and encourages bug holes and staining, we need to also educate our workers that “thinner is better” to help avoid ground contamination, reduce our costs (no matter how little) and have better-looking castings.

A second area of concern regarding the environment is Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in form release agents. Federal Regulations for allowable levels of VOCs have been in effect since September 1999. Since then, individual states have enacted legislation reducing the allowable levels of VOCs from the federal level of 450 g/L to a maximum of 250 g/L.

As local, state and provincial regulations are sometimes more stringent than federal regulations, you should check with your local authorities as to what requirements are in place for your area.

Potable (drinking) water
If you are producing castings that will be exposed to potable (drinking) water, a form release should meet the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 61 requirements. The intent is to establish standards and certify that the end product exposures are acceptable for human consumption. Very few release agents are ANSI 61 approved due to stringent tests that are conducted on the product. The tests include plant and quality certification, along with tests on the form release. It is not an inexpensive procedure, and recertification is handled on an annual basis.

Bob Waterloo is technical sales manager, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Indianapolis. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com or visit the Hill and Griffith website at www.grifcote.com. 

Concrete Form Release


Biodegradable, NSF Release Agents Offer A Range Of Options For Concrete Applications

National Sanitation Foundation (NSF/ANSI 61) certified companies now have more options for the type of concrete release agents they use during their construction projects. The Hill and Griffith Company offers the concrete industry readily biodegradable release agents that are VOC- compliant and NSF-certified. Multiple reactive technologies create a metallic soap that reduces bonding/adhesion, while promoting quick, clean stripping at the same time deterring build-up on forms and pallets.

Hill and Griffith produces concrete form release agents that are classified as either “Readily Biodegradable” or “Inherently Biodegradable,” based on OECD 301-B. Since the release agents are readily or inherently biodegradable, the environmental impact is lessened. (Precasters should check local regulations for specifics pertaining to their operation). Contractors have noticed cleaner releases, better-looking castings as well as minimized employee safety concerns. GRIFCOTE® products are widely used on precast, prestressed and poured-in-place applications among others.
The Hill and Griffith Company, headquartered in Cincinnati, has created an entire family of specialized concrete form release agents and form seasoning agents with the knowledge of what customers need and an eye on the future. For nearly 115 years, The Hill and Griffith Company has been a trusted provider of raw materials and technical expertise to the metal casting, concrete and hydraulic fluids industries.

In 1896 when John Hill founded the Hill and Griffith Company, the concept of quality was adopted. He stated, “Hill and Griffith feels that the integrity of the company must be represented in the products and services bearing our names and labels.” Today, this tradition lives on. 

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release

Precast Concrete Form Maintenance

Posted by Roger Roatch on Dec 1, 2017 2:29:16 PM

Properly maintaining your precast concrete forms will make them last.

Question: How can I make sure I’m getting the most longevity and use from my concrete forms?

Answer: We asked Roger Roatch with APA - the Engineered Wood Association, to respond:

When it comes to concrete structures, formwork may represent close to half the cost. Fortunately, concrete forms are durable workhorses that can be used over and over with proper maintenance and upkeep. Here are seven ways to extend the life and usefulness of your plywood concrete forms:

1. Strip forms carefully. Metal bars or pry bars should not be used on plywood because they will damage the panel surface and edge. Instead, use wood wedges, tapping gradually when necessary.

Precast Concrete From Oil Application 1.jpg

2. Clean and apply release agents. Soon after removal, plywood forms should be inspected for wear, cleaned, and repaired, spot-primed, refinished, and lightly treated with a form-release agent before reusing. Use a hardwood wedge and a stiff fiber brush for cleaning. Avoid using a metal brush because it may cause wood fibers to “wool.”

3. Apply sealants and release agents as directed. Protective sealant coatings and release agents for plywood increase form life and aid in stripping. Some panels may require only a light coating between uses. Applying a form release agent a few days before the plywood is used, then wiped so a thin film remains, will prolong the plywood’s life, increase release characteristics, and minimize staining. 

A chemically reactive release agent will give overlaid panels the longest life and should be applied before the first pour. Check with the manufacturer of the forming plywood for more details.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 2 copy.jpg

4. Know the difference between release agents and coatings. Release agents and coatings can affect forms and concrete differently, so select a release agent keeping mind its influence on the finished concrete surface. For example, some release agents including waxes or silicones should not be used where the concrete is to be painted.

Plywood form coatings, such as lacquers, resin, or plastic base compounds sometimes are used to form a hard, dry, water-resistant film on plywood forms. Usually, the field-applied coatings reduce the need for application of release agents between pours and result in greater reuse.

5. Patch and repair forms. On prefabricated forms, plywood panel faces (when the grade is suitable) may be reversed if damaged. Tie holes may be patched with metal plates, plugs, or plastic materials. Nails should be removed and holes filled with patching plaster, plastic wood, or other materials.

Proper Application of Precast Concrete Form Release Agents.jpg

6. Handle and store forms properly. Be carful to prevent panel chipping, denting, and corner damage during handling. Panels should never be dropped. Forms should be carefully piled flat, face to face and back to back. Forms should be cleaned immediately after stripping and can be solid-stacked or stacked in small packages with faces together.

Hairline cracks or splits may occur in the face ply. These “checks” may be more pronounced after repeated use of the form. Checks do not mean the plywood is delaminating. Form maintenance, including careful storage to assure slow drying, will minimize face checking.

7. Consider the effects of admixtures and chemicals. Many admixtures and pozzolans increase the abrasiveness or alkalinity of the concrete. While wood and phenolic overlays resist alkaline solutions and abrasion, some admixtures may significantly decrease the lifespan of a concrete-forming panel.

There’s much to consider when it comes to proper upkeep and maintenance of concrete forms. But following these tips will ensure the best life and use of forms project after project.

Roger Roatch is an Engineered Wood Specialist for APA. For more on concrete form maintenance and selecting the best form panel for the project, download the APA Concrete Forming Design/Construction Guide here.


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, Concrete Form Release Application Videos, Precast Concrete Plant Videos, Application of Form Oil

Precast Concrete Plant - Application of Form Oil Video

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 26, 2017 1:45:29 PM

NPCA Precast Concrete Plant Video Virtual Tour of US Concrete, a state of the art precast manufacturing facility acquired by Oldcastle Precast in August 2012

Application-of-Form-Oil-1.jpg

There's no job too big, too unique, or too challenging for US Concrete Precast Groups, San Diego facility. The plant is one of seven in US Concrete's Precast division, which serves the West, Southwest, and Midatlantic regions. Located in sunny southern California, it is the newest and largest facility in the family. Constructed in 2007, after years of planning, it is state of the art and designed with employee input, future growth, and the environment in mind. With 49 production workers and another 17 office employees, the plant manufactures a wide variety of products for a diverse range of customers. Standard products include site furnishings and a number of underground utility and waste water solutions. With a dedicated staff and a modern facility, custom projects are a regular part of the mix as well. 

Hello, my name is Todd Everett. I'm the general manager for US Concrete Precast Group Southern California, sunny San Diego. Our San Diego plant has been a member of the MPCA since 1981, so 31 years. To get to where we are today, we were in another location in Santee, California for over 30 years, and we got to the point through growth that we were beginning to be landlocked, could not grow anymore in the area we were in, and in 2005, we approached the board of US Concrete about expansion. We were given approval to do that so the search was on. Located the property we're on now in, I think it was late 2006. Got all the permitting done and started, broke ground in 2007, early February, and opened the plant in November of 2007.

Application-of-Form-Oil-2.jpg

Even more important than the facility are the people. The employees are part of a team, a point that is taken very seriously.

It's my belief that the keys to a successful precast operation, first they start with your people. We've been very blessed at this location, this plant, with the group of people we have assembled here. We consider ourself a team, therefor, we have team members.

Application-of-Form-Oil-3.jpg

As with most precast plants, a typical day begins bright and early at 6 am for production employees.

The production crew usually starts about 6 am in the morning. They get in and there's a lot of untarping, stripping, unbolting. There's usually a flow that's been predetermined already by weeks of planning ahead already before all the molds are out there. It's a system.

Application-of-Form-Oil-4.jpg

In the center of the plant, smaller products, such as drain boxes, catch basins, and meter boxes are stripped and laid on dunnage awaiting transport to either a delivery vehicle or the yard.

On the eastern end of the plant, utility vaults as large as 40 tons are stripped and flipped.

Once all products are stripped, workers immediately begin prepping the forms, including cleaning, caulking, and the application of form oil.

Application-of-Form-Oil-5.jpg

Meanwhile, on the western end of the plant, the weld shop is busy preparing cages for the empty forms. Large vault cages are assembled upside down on a raised platform by a welder, using pre-bent rebar. A cage for a large vault can take several hours.

Over by the state of the art batch plant, the morning begins with daily preparations in anticipation of the first batch, which usually occurs around 9 am. Once details are entered into the computer, the automated batch plant comes to life.

Outside, bins release the specified amount of fine and coarse aggregate, taking into account moisture content. The aggregate falls to a conveyor belt, which transfers it into one of two hoppers. One serves a one-yard mixer, the other a two-yard mixer.

Application-of-Form-Oil-6.jpg

One in the intended hopper, the aggregate is lifted up an elevator and released into the mixer.

Meanwhile, specified amounts of cement and fly ash are pumped into the mixer. After allowing the dry ingredients to mix, the batch plant releases water, add mixtures, and if needed, color and fiber.

Inside the plant, workers place a bucket under one of two chutes. Once full, the bucket is moved by forklift to one of the many overhead cranes and taken to the needed part of the plant.

Application-of-Form-Oil-7.jpg

In this instance, a yellow tinted batch is taken to the southwest corner of the plant where it's placed into forms for sidewalk pavers.
Once the batch arrives, the forms are filled, and a quality control inspection takes place.

In addition to standard products, the plant has found a niche in the custom market.

Application-of-Form-Oil-8.jpg

The team that we have assembled over the years at US Concrete, at this facility, San Diego Precast, is a team of individuals who have a great deal of knowledge. This is definitely one of those companies where there are some senior people here that have a lot of knowledge in concrete. The way we work through a custom project that's unique to us, is we get the team together. We get those that are going to be involved. We get our draftsmen, our salesmen, project managers, plant managers, quality control. We get a group of people together and then what we do is we go over the project. The goal is to make sure that it's successful, so we need to make sure that we're all on the same page. It's not a choice of will we fail. It's a choice of here's what's been put in front of us, now how do we make that succeed. That's what makes this company so special.

One recent example of the plant's custom work, is a stress ribbon bridge the company produced in 2009.

Application-of-Form-Oil-9.jpg

The stress ribbon bridge at Lake Hodges, it's actually the world's longest stress-ribbon bridge. It consists of three spans totaling 990 foot. It was also an endangered species area where they had a lot of nesting grounds for birds and things like that. The project had to be non-intrusive to the local surroundings. At the same time, the construction had to be mindful of that, schedule-wise. The finished product was quite a surprise, I think, overall to the designer that it came out so well.

Another extremely important facet of production is the quality control process. The plant has been MPCA certified since 1988, the first year certification was offered, and was among the first group of plants to reach the 20-year Continuous Certification mark in 2008.

Quality is important because we have control of every aspect from start to finish. We can control every environment on site and they can't do that. We have the ability to produce extremely precise products. The plant was designed at our old facility and we were able to incorporate everything that we wanted into the lab. A lot of the stuff we built in is stuff that we know that we're going to use 20 years from now.

Application-of-Form-Oil-10.jpg

The plant was also designed with many environmentally friendly details.

We're very mindful of the environment. The solar panels, over 60% of our energy comes from the sun. Skylights, so we're using natural light, we're using motion sensors throughout the plant, as well as the offices. Our environmentally friendly technology in our concrete, with our fly ash and other supplemental materials. We're contemporary, cutting edge if you will, precast plant.

US Concrete Precast Groups, San Diego facility, continues to find a steady flow of orders for waste water and underground utility products, as well as its custom projects. Looking to the future, it hopes to continue the growth it's had since it was founded and adapt to the ever-changing needs of its customers.

I think through our industry, through the National Precast Concrete Association, we continue to keep pushing the envelope and challenging ourself and challenge each other to continue to advance.


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, Concrete Form Release Application Videos, Precast Concrete Plant Videos, Application of Form Oil

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