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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Review of AWWA Standard for Concrete Potable Water Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe & Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Sep 6, 2018 11:04:40 PM

"The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use."

Concrete Pressure Pipr 101

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

I. Introduction

I.A. Background

There are two types of prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe:

(1) the lined-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder lined with concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped directly on the steel cylinder and coated with mortar; and

(2) the embedded-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder encased in concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped on the exterior concrete surface and coated with cement mortar.

The lined-cylinder type, which was first used in the United States in 1942, is furnished in sizes from 16 in. (410 mm) to 60 in. (1,520 mm). The embedded-cylinder type, which was developed later and first installed in 1953, is most commonly manufactured in sizes 48 in. (1,220 mm) and larger. Both types are designed for the specific combination of internal pressure and external load required for the project in accordance with the procedures outlined in ANSI/AWWA C304, Standard for Design of Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe is used for transmission mains, distribution feeder mains, pressure siphons (including river crossings), penstocks, industrial pressure lines, water intake lines, and other applications. In the manufacture of lined-cylinder pipe, the first step is to fabricate and hydrostatically test the steel cylinder with joint rings attached. The cylinder is then lined with concrete to form the core. The concrete is placed either centrifugally, by vertical casting, or by a radial compaction method. The concrete lining is cured and high-tensile wire is wrapped around the core directly on the steel cylinder. For a selected wire size, the tension and spacing of the wire are controlled to produce a predetermined residual compression in the core to meet design requirements. The wrapped core is then covered with a dense premixed mortar coating applied by a mechanical impact method. In the manufacture of embedded-cylinder pipe, the cylinder and joint rings are constructed and tested in the same manner as lined-cylinder pipe. The cylinder is encased in concrete by vertical casting and mechanical vibration to constitute the core. After curing, the wire reinforcement is wound under tension in one or more layers around the outside of the concrete core containing the cylinder, instead of directly on the cylinder. The exterior coating of premixed mortar is placed by impaction. 

Concrete Pressure Pipe Basics

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

4.6.5 Concrete for pipe core.

4.6.5.1 General. The concrete in the cores may be placed by the centrifugal method, by the vertical casting method, or by other approved methods.

4.6.5.10 Placing concrete by vertical casting method. The concrete lining or core shall be cast on-end on a cast-iron or steel base ring with rigid steel collapsible forms for the concrete surfaces. The forms shall be designed to ensure that they will have smooth contact surfaces, tight joints, and that they will be firmly and accurately held in proper position without distortion during the placing of the concrete. The forms shall be designed to allow the pipe core to be removed without damaging the surfaces of the concrete. The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use.

(Remember that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)

The transporting and placing of concrete shall be carried out by methods that will not cause the separation of concrete materials or the displacement of the steel cylinder or forms from their proper positions. Adequate methods of mechanical vibration shall be used to compact the concrete in the forms and to ensure satisfactory surfaces. 


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Retaining Walls: Designing Better Solutions

Precast Concrete Pavement Slabs: Design and Construction Considerations

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe, Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe, Grifcote LV-50 Plus, Concrete Form Release

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Water Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Water Pipe with Steve Smith

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 30, 2018 11:59:55 PM

This video was produced to show how to select a large diameter water transmission main product, by Steve Smith (Pipe Industry Icon)  

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 1

Hello, my name is Steve Smith and I'm with Forterra Pressure Pipe. What I want to talk to you about today is two pipe products. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which is we're looking at right here. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, what you see here is you can see the prestressing wire. This is six gauge wire, class three. It's got a tensile range of 252,000 to 282,000. You'll notice that the spacing between the wires, that term today is called the pitch, the pitch of the wire, means the space in between rod wrap to rod wrap. For instance, this looks like it could be a one inch pitch. You'll notice the mortar coating. The mortar coating is one inch over top of the cylinder. Okay. What we're gonna transition to now, I want to show you the difference between the prestressed pipe and what known as the bar wrap pipe.

 

 

This is bar wrap pipe. To the naked eye, one might say they look exactly the same. But you're gonna notice this is rod. It's not prestressing wire, it's rod. Wrapped at about 500 psi, and which it's got a heavy steel cylinder, which differs from the prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which only has a 16 gauge cylinder.

Bar wrap pipe is rated typically zero all the way up to 250 psi.

The key difference is bar wrap pipe is a semi-rigid design. Semi-flexible if you will, versus prestress, which is a rigid design. So bar wrap pipe does rely on soil side support, much more important than say prestress. What this demonstrates here is the ability to be able to chip out the mortar coating.

Take the rod wraps and basically cut them and bend them out of your way, and this shows the application where we can actually weld a flange in the field.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 3

What makes bar wrap unique, unlike prestress, is prestress, because of the wire wraps, you basically can't cut this pipe and make any modifications, because the wire is under tension. Where versus this pipe, because the rod is not under tension, this is a steel pipe design, it gives you the ability to cut section, this type of bar wrap pipe. If we go to the other side, I'll show you some other examples.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 2

What you're looking at here is bar wrap pipe. Notice the rod. What this demonstrates is the ability to take say a 20 foot section of bar wrap pipe, you can literally cut the pipe in half. What you see here, we take the rod wraps and just peel a couple rods back, and what this shows the ability to weld a flange in the field, with the butt strap. That's something, quite frankly, that you could not do with the prestress concrete sonar pipe.

So when it comes to adaptability and repair ability in the field, bar wrap has become a favorite choice here in these. This just demonstrates a harness clamp joint. This is a harness style joint that's been around for many, many years. This is one form of restraint joint.

If we go back over here to the left, obviously this demonstrates our snap ring joint. This is snap ring joint. It's a joint, it was a Price Brothers design joint back in the early '70s, 1973. And it's joint ring we still use today.

We jump to the other side, you can see this is the insert. It basically allows the contractor to push the spigot into the bell. You simply tighten down, loosen a nut and tighten down this bolt. And the term we use, now the snap ring is engaged, means it's locked down. That you can see in this cut out section, because it's smaller diameter, how it locks in the spigot ring and keep it from backing out under thrust conditions.

(Thanks to Steve for the great video. Another thing to remember is that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Get Certified - NPCA’s Plant Certification Program assures a uniformly high degree of excellence

Take Your Career to a New Level With Precast University ® and the Master Precaster Program

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Prestressed concrete water pipe, Bar wrapped concrete water pipr, Concrete Form Release

2017 NSF/ANSI Water Treatment and Component Standards

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 26, 2018 11:02:29 AM

A new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added.

Water is, of course, the liquid molecule that we need to sustain life. Any kind of contaminant in water can be detrimental not only to granting this basic need, but it can wickedly and unnecessarily introduce new health problems and even deter individuals from consuming it. Therefore, it is crucial that public water supplies remain clean while supporting a system by which most people in modern society live. (From the American National Standards institute site.)

Drinking Water System Components



NSF/ANSI 61-2017: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects

This American National Standard sets health effects criteria for water system components, specifically the materials or products that come into contact with drinking water, drinking water treatment chemical, or both and can potentially impart chemical contaminants and impurities. System components covered include protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings), joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants), mechanical devices (water meters, valves), pipes, plumbing devices, and process media. Most governmental agencies in North America require compliance with NSF/ANSI 61 for water treatment and distribution products.

NSF/ANSI 61-2017 contains the following revisions: exposure and normalization criteria specific to concrete aggregate have been added, a new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added, language regarding tank covers has been incorporated, allowable volumes of test assemblies have been updated, updated terminology on control samples has been included, lead content requirements have been updated, and updates have been made to several pass/fail values in Annex D on Drinking Water Criteria.


(Warning from  to manufacturers that don't comply with the standard when required. Their blog page.)

The SCAM

ENGINEERS, CONTRACTORS and OWNERS, BEWARE! There are manufacturers out there who continue to try to game the system, but their irresponsibility can easily become YOUR LOSS! Here is an excerpt from the EPA in a summary statement made about the SDWA Section 1417.

Since 1986, the Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA” or “the Act”) has prohibited the use of certain items that are not lead free and since 1996 the Act has made it unlawful for anyone to introduce into commerce items that are not lead free.

ANY MANUFACTURER WHO IS MISLEADING THEIR CUSTOMERS INTO BELIEVING THAT THEIR SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO THE STANDARD IS VIOLATING FEDERAL LAW AS OF JANUARY 4, 2014! There is no nice way to say this! Unfortunately, this irresponsible behavior has become commonplace within the industry as there have been many manufacturers who have put off certification believing the enforcement would be low.

I spoke with our third party lab regarding the testing of components and systems and this is what they said:

Manufacturers can request the testing and certification of either a component or system. If a client chooses to only certify a component, then only the component can be labeled and advertised as certified.

To clarify, standard NSF/ANSI 61 addresses several different types of potential contaminants, but not specifically lead content. Low lead requirements are defined separately in three different requirements:

• Federal lead law: “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” – Effective January 4, 2014
• California lead law: “The California health & Safety Code 116875”
• NSF/ANSI 372: Standard, not a law, providing test methods.
It is important to note that having compliance to NSF/ANSI 372 does not substitute certification to either the Federal or CA State lead laws.

If a manufacturer has a SYSTEM certification, this will be obvious to the user if they look at the certification document provided by the test laboratory. The QuantumFlo Certification is, without question, perfectly clear.


72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe.

Ameron supplied this 72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe (CCP) consists of a steel cylinder lined with concrete or cement mortar, then helically wrapped with a mild steel bar and coated with dense cement mortar. CCP is designed and manufactured in accordance with the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standard C303 and AWWA Manual M9, and is normally supplied in standard diameters of 18 to 72 inches for operating pressures up to 400 psi. Pipe has been manufactured in larger sizes and for higher pressures based on the concepts of this standard.


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Louisiana DOT testing precast concrete ramp

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Precast concrete barn has all the bells and whistles for 280 Alberta dairy cattle


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Forms, Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Casting Supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Form Release

Winemaker takes a concrete step forward (NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents)

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 15, 2018 3:22:47 PM

French oak and stainless steel have earned their place in the winery, but a growing number of Northwest winemakers are experimenting with a third maturation material: concrete.

NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents.jpg

Jesse Lange, winemaker and general manager at Lange Estate Winery in Dundee, Ore., takes a sample of Pinot gris fermented entirely in the winery’s new concrete vessel. A 500-gallon, egg-shaped vessel weighs 6,000 pounds.

By Margarett Waterbury For the Capital Press
Published on February 15, 2018

At Lange Estate Winery in Dundee, Ore., winemaker Jesse Lange celebrated the 30th anniversary of his family business with a brand-new piece of equipment: a 500-gallon concrete tank from Sonoma Cast Stone. With a pricetag of about $15,000, it weighs about 6,000 pounds, is made from specially formulated concrete, and is shaped like a gigantic egg. According to the company’s CEO, Steve Rosenblatt, they’ve sold roughly 500 concrete tanks to wineries. “It shows up during the middle of harvest,” Jesse laughs of his purchase. “We had to use two forklifts to unload it, it was so heavy.”

Why concrete? Jesse had tasted some concrete-matured wines from other wineries, including Syncline Wine Cellars in the Columbia Gorge AVA, and was excited by the textural and flavor contributions of the material, especially when it came to the balanced, Burgundian-style wines he and his team produce.

After an initial treatment that included spraying the egg with a solution of tartaric acid, Jesse was ready to take the egg for a spin. The very first fill was Pinot gris must, which underwent a complete fermentation in concrete.

A sample pulled from a valve in the side revealed a citrusy, lightly tropical wine with chalky mineral undertones and a soft, almost powdery texture. “The wine has gained some gravity,” Jesse says, “especially in the mid-palate. There’s a lot of richness, but it’s not heavy, it’s more like volume.”

After the Pinot gris is finished, Jesse plans to replace it with Chardonnay, followed by Pinot noir. It’s all part of the getting-to-know-you process, he says. “You can’t improve something until you understand it, and you can’t understand without experimenting.”
Concrete is trendy right now, but it’s not a brand new material in the wine world. Subterranean tanks made from concrete have historically been used in Burgundy, France, and ceramic amphorae made from similar material have been employed for millennia in Georgia in eastern Europe. Jesse is excited about concrete’s potential contribution to Oregon wines, especially white wines such as Pinot gris and Chardonnay, which he says are becoming more popular.

“We’ve been making Chardonnay for 30 years, but all of a sudden, people are like, ‘Can we get more?’” says Jesse. “I know we’re making some of the best Chardonnay in the world. New world Pinot gris started in the Willamette Valley. As Oregonians, we don’t toot our own horn very well, but as an industry, we need to do it.”

While Lange Estate Winery hasn’t released any concrete wine yet, Jesse is feeling optimistic about the first tests.

He’s not sure yet if this year’s concrete wine will be bottled as a standalone label, or if it will be used as a component of Lange’s annual Pinot Gris Reserve release, but he is already eyeing another concrete vessel — this one even larger than the first.
“It’s a 1,000-gallon cube,” he says. “I’ve heard the shape might make solids drop out of solution more quickly.” Why more concrete? Jesse says he’s excited about the way the wines taste. Then he laughs. “And having a story to tell is always important.”

Thanks to the March 9, 2018 edition of the Precast Digest, published by the National Precast Concrete Association


NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents

Grifcote LV-50 Plus was created specifically for use with castings that would be exposed to potable water.

The material is NSF (ANSI 61) approved for use with potable water and some restrictions do apply in specific applications.

 

 

Low VOC and Biodegradable Release Agent

  • All Grifcote products are EPA VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) compliant with less than 250 grams per liter of VOCs. Grifcote is compliant in all 50 States and Canada.

  • All are classified as either readily biodegradable, with a half-life of 28 days or less or inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or less.

  • All products comply with federal or state regulations regarding concrete release agents.

  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

 


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agent, Concrete Form Release, New Precast Concrete Technology, Barrier Release Agent, Reactive Release Agent, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Supplies

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