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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

NPCA extends product-specific certification to water, wastewater tanks

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Oct 18, 2018 12:42:09 PM

The National Precast Concrete Association takes quality control and validation to the next level with a new product-focused certification for water and wastewater tanks.

NPCA Certified Water Tank

Water or wastewater tanks fabricated by Listed Product participants will soon have an additional quality assurance marking to accompany NPCA Certified Plant. Photo and article from Sept. 2018 Concrete Products Magazine.

While its Plant Certification program has traditionally centered on precast concrete production processes candidate operations must abide, the just-launched Optional Product Listing for Water and Wastewater Tanks Program describes specific product models, plus design and performance criteria to obtain certification. Like other association programs, the new offering enlists independent third-party engineering firms accredited to ISO/IEC 17020:2012 for Plant Inspection.

All NPCA Certified Plants can participate in the water and wastewater tank program by completing a detailed submittal package for the model(s) they wish to list. The submittal includes plant information; product description indicating tank capacity and model number; complete set of drawings; plus, reinforcing details and structural calculations. Documents must bear structural or professional engineer stamp. Once the submittal is approved, the plant undergoes an unannounced inspection that includes a watertightness test on a tank chosen at random. The plant will be granted a product listing based on successful test completion. Listed products will appear on the NPCA site, www.precast.org, below the producer name, and with plant product schedule.

Just as Plant Certification enables quality-conscious agencies, engineers and specifiers to identify and select premier precast concrete producers, NPCA notes, the Product Listing Program takes certification one step farther to include specific water or wastewater tank models. Plants displaying the NPCA Certified Plant and NPCA Listed Product markings on their tanks underscore processes complying with industry, design and performance standards. The certification and listing programs reflect NPCA’s commitment to assisting members with maintaining excellence in precast production and operations. By setting one standard of quality, they level the playing field for all producers pursuing market segments or individual contracts.

Additional information on Plant Certification and Listed Products can be obtained from NPCA Director of Certification and Regulator Services Richard Kolewski, 800/366-7731. 


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agent, Concrete Casting Supplies, NPCA Convention, Potable Water Tanks, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks

Why Precast Concrete Cistern pH is Important

Posted by Jonathan Meier on Jul 12, 2018 5:58:17 PM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Jonathan Meier with Rain Brothers LLC covers the basics.

Concrete cisterns are, in our experience, the best type of tank to use for underground drinking water systems. Rainwater tends to have a lower pH (acidic), while concrete has a higher pH (alkaline). As rainwater fills a concrete tank, the concrete then actually helps neutralize the water and balance the pH, if not slightly alkalinize it, which is why, after the cistern has gone through a few empty-full cycles, a litmus test of your cistern water would reveal a pH of between 6-8 – the optimal range for a good drinking water system.

Precast Concrete Cistern for Drinking Water

While concrete cisterns help neutralize acidic rainwater, initially, the residual concrete dust from the manufacturing/casting of the tanks will elevate the water's pH to high alkaline levels (10-11). This is completely normal, though for new concrete cisterns, precautions should be taken to get water down to 7-9 range. There are two approaches to managing this initial alkalinity:

1) Flush the tank. For this method, we recommend hauling in a load of water from a local water hauler (in Ohio, a list of water haulers can be obtained through your County's Department of Health or from the Ohio Department of Health Office of Environmental Health). You can then use the hauled water to rinse the walls of the tank to remove as much concrete dust residue as possible. Do not drink this water, but instead either pump it out after a few days or use it for non-potable applications (flushing toilets, showering, irrigation, etc.). Occasionally, it may take two and sometimes three full empty-fill cycles before the water inside the tank reaches a safe pH level of 9.

2) Pressure wash/scrub. For this method, once the tank has initially been installed, use a pressure washer with a 55-gallon drum of clean water and a cup of unscented chlorine bleach to pressure wash the walls of the tank. You may also use a scrub brush with a bucket of water/chlorine mix and hand scrub the walls. Doing so will remove the majority of concrete dust from the side walls. Then, when possible, pump out the water from the bottom of the tank (note: you may have to put more water into the tank to be able to pump the "dirty water" out). If it is not possible to pump out the bottom of the tank after pressure washing/scrubbing, then get a load of hauled water into the tank but do not drink water from this load. Again, use that first load for non-potable uses only.

(Washing the tank will also remove the NSF approved concrete form release. Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.)

These precautions may sound intimidating, but the reality is that the work on the front end is minimal compared to the lifetime of fresh, clean water you will receive from a concrete cistern. 

As always, thanks for reading.

(Thanks to Rain Brothers LLC for this article and video below.)


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

• Is a Rainwater Cistern Right for You?

Second U.S. "Living Building Challenge" Home Certified

• How I Ended Up Living Off the Grid in New Mexico


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks, Concrete Form Release Agent

Why Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks Are The Best

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 5, 2018 8:27:33 AM

Why you should only use a concrete tank to store drinking water

Any water that is stationary will eventually become stagnant and undrinkable. How water is stored and its temperature will determine how long the water stays healthy and drinkable. Spring water is often considered as the best water you can drink, store your water in an underground concrete tank and you are producing your own spring water.

Precast Concrete Potable Water Tanks

Why tank water is so acidic

Underground concrete tanks is normally roof harvested rain water, which is naturally acidic. The acidity of normal rain is attributed mainly to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere which gets absorbed as water condenses from a gas to a liquid and it is these liquid droplets that forms clouds and eventually rain. Even in areas that are minimally affected by human pollution, the pH of rain water can range from 4.5 to 5.0 which is fairly acidic.

In built-up areas around cities, above normal acid rain is generally caused by human pollution and in highly polluted cities rain water can become as acidic as lemon juice which causes lots of problems for old historic buildings.

This acidity forms part of the natural process that allows rain water, with the help of microbes found in the soil, to dissolve minerals from the soil into a colloidal form that now makes the water neutral and full of minerals which can then be taken up by plants. Acidic water is however not choosy and will happily do the same thing in the human body. Resulting in the stealing of alkalizing minerals and therefore a net loss of these vital minerals from the body as the water attempts to achieve a more neutral pH balance.

Why is concrete the best material to store water in

The very nature of water itself is that it wants to balance out to a neutral pH. and a concrete tank is the only man made storage system that will allow this to happen. To neutralize itself, water will absorb some of the minerals out of the concrete and will generally settle in a slightly alkaline state.

An in-ground concrete water tank will keep the water at the temperature that it fell out of the sky at and if you are in an area that gets mostly winter rain, that cold water will remain cold all summer.

Even above ground, light cannot penetrate through the concrete walls of a concrete and into the water.

All of this become very important, because roof harvested rain water picks up all sorts of dust, bacteria, and bugs and even after being pre-filtered some always gets through.

Water that is alkaline, cold and removed from light will not support the growth of any bacteria that makes its way into your tank, thus allowing this water to stay clean and drinkable for years.

If you cannot put your tank underground, paint it white; or allow ivy to cover it to keep the sun off it and the water will stay very cold.

Yes in time, this leaching of minerals will compromise the integrity of a concrete tank, but a well-made tank is good for a hundred odd years.

(Thanks to Versatile Tanks for this article)


If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies.

NSFANSI 61 and Your Concrete Release Agent Selection

The NSF mark, well respected by public health officials and drinking water utilities, is recognized as a symbol of product quality and integrity. Our responsive, personalized service quickly guides your products through the certification process, ensuring that they get to market on time and on budget. We offer product bracketing services wherever possible to help keep costs down, and we provide pricing up front so there are no hidden surprises down the road.

NSF is accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) and NSF listings satisfy the requirements of the Canadian National Plumbing Code, U.S. Model Codes and the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC).

U.S. and Canadian Approvals

Drinking water system components that are used in centralized water treatment plants and water distribution systems up through the water meter are typically regulated by state or provincial drinking water agencies.

Forty-eight U.S. states have legislation, regulations or policies requiring drinking water system components to comply with, or be certified to, NSF/ANSI 61.

Eleven Canadian provinces/territories require drinking water system components to comply with the requirements of NSF/ANSI 61.

Get more information and see a comprehensive map of the U.S. states and Canadian provinces/territories that require NSF/ANSI 61.


For additional information on the proper concrete release agent to use for concrete drinking water tanks, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

• Water Tank Market: Emerging Trends, Highlights and Challenges Forecast 2023

• Water Storage Systems Market: Evolving Technology, Trends and Industry Analysis & Forecast to 2022

Global Water Storage Tanks Market Outlook 2018- ZCL Composites, Synalloy Corporation, AG Growth International


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting, Precast Concrete, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, Precast Concrete Drinking Water Tanks, Concrete Form Release Agent

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