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Die Casting News

Applying and Handling Die Lubricants

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 9, 2020 9:11:53 AM

How to control lubricants for better housekeeping

Excerpt from the April 2003 issue of Stamping Journal by Stan Reinke

Effective application of die lubricants typically is overlooked in many stamping facilities. Many companies try to get by with applying as little lubricant as possible, just so they don't have to deal with the mess.

However, metal stampers need to move away from thinking of in-die lubrication as a necessary evil and instead view it as a powerful tool that, when applied effectively, can improve die life, press speed, and part quality.

In many applications, the lubricant first is applied to the stock. Some companies use roller coaters for this job. However, for operations in which the lubricant must be reapplied in the die, spray lubrication often is required.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, die casting lubricant management, Stamping Journal

AFS Casting Awards 2020 - Die Casting Outstanding Achievement

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 1, 2020 9:12:04 PM

Outstanding Achievement: Magnesium Strut Tower Brace

Excerpt from the Modern Casting May 2020 article.

This year's American Foundry Society named 2 foundry castings with their top honors as well as 8 others for outstanding achievement. One of those companies achieved outstanding achievement for their unique cold chamber high-pressure die-cast magnesium strut tower brace. 

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Mold Lubricants, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Lubrication and Application, die casting lubricant management, Modern Casting Magazine

Die-Release and Die-Spray Technologies Improve Productivity

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 24, 2020 1:34:31 PM

As lightweight automotive design fuels more diecasting applications, faster die-spraying is cutting cycle times, and more uniform adhesion is improving process reliability.

Excerpt from the June 2020 article from Foundry Management & Technology

Cost optimization and improved productivity and product quality are driving die casting strategies, particularly in the face of global competition and the need to produce more complex components. Automotive design and manufacturing are prompting to die casters to take on more complex, lightweight, components for powertrain, chassis, and structural parts. In turn, this has guided investments in larger high-pressure die casting machines and more expensive tooling, which has manufacturers seeking to improve productivity, process reliability, and product quality, and to extend die service.

The main purpose of a die-release agent is to allow clean part release and provide a release film that minimizes die soldering, and uniform coverage is critical to both process reliability and the finished product quality.  Standard water-based lubricants evaporate in contact with a hot steel die, leaving a lubricant coating. This is a critical stage, because too much lubricant means liquid cannot evaporate quickly enough when molten metal is injected; and too little lubricant may result in poor material flow (i.e., "die soldering"), and then causing surface defects and porosity that reduce finished product quality.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Mold Lubricants, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Lubrication and Application, die casting lubricant management, Foundry Management & Technology magazine

Predicting Castability for Thin-Walled HPDC Parts

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 17, 2020 2:43:30 PM

Current simulation tools account for the physics of fluidity, and should be capable of predicting castability too. Investigating thermal resistance shot sleeve heat loss effect of conventional HTC values.

Excerpt from the December 2014 article from Foundry Management & Technology by R. Bhola and S. Chandra

The term "thin-wall castings" for the HPDC process has been investigated for well over two decades.  However, the perception of what is considered a thin-walled part has changed over the years and continues to change.  Historically, 3-mm wall thickness was considered a thin HPDC part and that number decreased over the years to 2 mm, and further to 1 mm. Currently, there is a push for even thinner walled parts in the electronics industry, with thickness demands as low as 0.6 mm.  The automotive industry has been looking to make ultra large castings (ULC) using various processes, including semi-solid, permanent mold, and HPDC processes, with target thickness in the range of 1 to 2 mm[2].

Thin-walled parts are difficult to cast because the melt cools rapidly upon contact with the relatively cold die steel and can solidify quickly before die filling is complete.  The distance a given molten material travels before it freezes and stops moving is commonly referred to as "fluidity".  The dominant variables affecting fluidity are: thermophysical properties of the melt; the temperature of the melt above liquidus (superheat); and mold coating release agent[3,4].  Much of this work on quantifying fluidity was based on experiments under low pressures, generally not exceeding 15 psi to force the liquid metal through a passage. 

Further, die temperature and the heat-transfer coefficient at the die surface do not seem to be considered properties that define fluidity, though Dewhirst[4] acknowledged that the heat-transfer coefficient at the mold surface does play a significant role in the measured flow lengths for a given alloy type under given test conditions.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Mold Lubricants, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Lubrication and Application, die casting lubricant management, Foundry Management & Technology magazine

New-Generation Die Cooling and Die Lubricant Application Systems

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 10, 2020 3:23:40 PM

Problems with conventional approaches to forging-die lubrication can be eliminated with a system that uses PLC-controlled positive-displacement pumping systems.

Excerpt from the November 2007 Forging Magazine article by the Forging staff

In the forging process, friction between die and part, consistency of friction from part to part, and consistency of die temperature all affect not only the part quality and part tolerances, but also die life, and hence operating efficiency and operating costs.

Indeed, die life is affected not only by thermal cycling but also by friction between the die and the part being formed, variations of which greatly affect the severity of thermal cycling itself. Die designers base their designs on assumed, given friction. Presses also are designed based on loads caused by formation of parts, and these loads are affected significantly by friction, in addition to temperature and material being formed. Even billet weight is based on estimated material flow which, again, is greatly impacted by temperature and friction.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Mold Lubricants, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Lubrication and Application, die casting lubricant management, Forging Magazine

Die Soldering in Aluminum Die Casting

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 3, 2020 4:11:49 PM

Excerpt from the U.S. Department of Energy article by Q. Han, E.A. Kenik and S. Viswanathan 

Two types of tests, dipping tests and dip-coating tests were carried out on small steel cylinders using pure aluminum and 380 alloy to investigate the mechanism of die soldering during aluminum die casting. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the morphology and composition of the phases formed during soldering. A soldering mechanism is postulated based on experimental observations. A soldering critical temperature is postulated at which iron begins to react with aluminum to form an aluminum-rich liquid phase and solid intermetallic compounds. When the temperature at the die surface is higher than this critical temperature, the aluminum-rich phase is liquid and joins the die with the casting during the subsequent solidification. The paper discusses the mechanism of soldering for the case of pure aluminum and 380 alloy casting in a steel mold, the factors that promote soldering, and the strength of the bond formed when soldering occurs.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, die casting lubricant management

Blistering in Semi-Solid Die Casting of Aluminum Alloys and Its Avoidance

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 28, 2020 11:07:38 AM

Excerpt from the article in the June 2005 issue of Acta Materialia by X.G. Hu, Q. Zhu, S.P. Madison, H.V. Atkinson, et. al.

Semi-solid die casting of relatively high solid-fraction aluminum alloys (0.5–0.7 fraction solid) can be used for the production of high quality industrial components. However, surface blistering during solution heat treatment can still be a problem and is associated with the entrapment of gas whether from air or from burned lubricant. Here the mechanism for formation of blisters is presented. The Reynolds number in the surface layer of the semi-solid flow is then analyzed to obtain the relationships with hydraulic diameter and flow velocity for different slurry temperatures. The hypothesis is that it is some flow instability at the flow front, even where the overall nature of the flow is essentially laminar, which is leading to the entrapment. The crucial finding is that if the Reynolds number is plotted against temperature there is a decrease followed by an increase. The position of this minimum is dependent on the ratio of fill velocity to the hydraulic diameter, v/D. Thus there is a ‘sweet spot’ in terms of temperature (i.e. fraction liquid), flow velocity and hydraulic diameter (i.e. die design) where the flow front has the maximum stability, giving maximum resistance to blister formation. This is in contrast with conventional wisdom which would suggest that low fractions liquid would give the most stable flow front. A rationale for this is presented in terms of the particle crowding at the relatively low fraction of liquid.

Experimental results with aluminum alloy 319s as an exemplar, and a die which has varying cross sectional dimensions, are presented and validate the hypothesis.

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Tags: Die Casting, Die Casting Release Agents, Die Casting Lubricants, Release Agents for Die Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Defects, Die Casting Lubricant, Aluminum Die Casting, die casting lubricant management, acta materialia

NADCA's Congress West Returns! Spotlights Die Casting Lubricant

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 13, 2017 2:01:52 PM

Room Block Closes December 21 - Register Today!

From the Dec 13, 2017 Newsletter: 

NADCA is excited to announce the return of Die Casting Congress West on January 11-12, 2018 at the Hilton Long Beach. The Congress will feature technology highlights of our Congress in Atlanta earlier this fall. The event will kick off with a cocktail reception on January 11 and lead into a full day of presentations on January 12.  Presentations to include: 

Session: State of the Industry
An update on the current state of the die casting industry.
Paul Brancaleon, North American Die Casting Association 

Session: Structural
The ability of the die casting industry to improve cast component performance will help die casting continue to be a relevant manufacturing process. Structural die castings have been identified as having the potential to expand markets for die castings by providing improved mechanical properties. Higher strengths and elongations allow die castings to be used as structural, or even crash-worthy, components on automobiles. Research on alloys and heat treatments used in structural die castings will be presented during this session.
Paul Brancaleon, North American Die Casting Association 
 
Session: Die Coatings  
Die casting is a harsh environment for dies and tooling. Heat checking, soldering and wash-out are all issues that die cast tooling faces. Research is being performed on the use of coatings to not only protect the tooling, but also reduce the amount of die spray needed. Protecting the surface of the die, as well as the shot sleeve inner diameter, will extend the life of the die and sleeve, which in turn leads to better quality castings.
Steve Midson, The Midson Group
 
Session: Computer Modeling
To make higher quality die castings the die casting process needs to be understood on a fundamental level. Transforming the basic principles of die casting into mathematical equations, the process can be simulated on a computer. Advances in computer simulation lead to process improvements, improved tooling, and optimum utilization of new alloys.
Al Miller, The Ohio State University

Session: Advanced Technology    
Customers are constantly looking for higher quality parts at lower costs with shorter lead times. There are limits to the benefits of improving process control. Eventually, new technology is required to meet the demands of new products or stricter quality and functional requirements. This session will look at some of those new technologies and how they can be utilized to improve die castings.  
Beau Glim, North American Die Casting Association

The Congress is sponsored by a limited number of Suppliers that attendees will be able to meet with to learn more about products and services available to the die casting industry.

Sponsors Include: 
Thermtronix Corp
BuhlerPrince Inc
Visi-Trak Worldwide, LLC
Frech USA Inc
B&L Information Systems Inc
Oerlikon Balzers
MAGMA Foundry Technologies Inc
Hill and Griffith Co
Hildreth Manufacturing LLC
Midland Technologies, Inc
Anviloy By Astaras Inc
HPM North America Corporation

The cost is just $20 for NADCA Members and $50 for Non-Members (note that registration includes access to the cocktail hour as well as breakfast and lunch on January 12).  In addition, if you will be sending 5 or more people we are offering special pricing.  

Information and registration can be found herePlease note that the housing block closes December 21, so make your reservations right away! If you have any questions please feel free to contact Melisa Ryzner, CMP at mryzner@diecasting.org or 847.808.3161.


A Short History of the Die Casting Lubricant

Die casting has progressed over the last sixty years from small parts of lower melting metals and alloys such as zinc, to castings of large parts, such as tailgates and engine blocks with high-melting alloys of aluminum or magnesium.

The metals are injected into a mold very quickly and under high pressure. The pressure is maintained until solidification, which produces accurate parts with good surface finish. Depending on the alloys, it's possible to obtain a variety of physical and mechanical properties over a range of sizes and weights.

As die casting conditions grow more severe with higher temperatures, pressure and increased part size. Higher performance die casting lubricants are needed to enhance the process, as long as they don’t negatively affect the quality of the casting.

The Hill and Griffith Company is dedicated to providing high performance die casting lubricants, application and management technologies to continue to increase the size, quality and strength of diecast parts and assemblies.


Die Casting Process in Google News:

The global aluminum casting market is projected to reach USD 97.36 billion by 2025

Die Casting Machine Market 2022 | Industry Outlook, Growth, Trends and Forecast in Europe


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant, offer die casting technical support and recommend release agents, lubricants, plunger lubricants and permanent mold lubricants that suit your needs. Products that represent the latest in technology and ongoing research that enhance competitiveness and increase productivity. 

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Tags: Die Casting, Metal Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Release Agent, Die Casting Lubricant, Die Casting Technical Support, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Tooling Coatings

Application of die casting lubricant

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 6, 2017 3:49:04 PM

Proper die casting lubricant and its application ensure that parts eject easily and without defects.

Also called mold release or die spray a precise amount of it is sprayed onto the steel mold before each shot. It evaporates when it comes in contact with the hot steel leaving just the right amount of lubricated coating and required temperature of the mold.

If it cannot evaporate fast enough or if the tool cools too quickly, the molten metal may become more porous. Porosity is always caused by the die casting process. Proper component design, draft, overflows and venting can reduce porosity; as well as specially formulated die release agents.

If there is not enough, the component may stick in the die and cause defects. The larger the draft; the less mold release required. 

Die lubricants are formulated specifically for zinc, aluminum or magnesium and the complexity of the die casting. 

Water-based lubricants provide a release agent and die cooling. Oil-based lubricants may be more appropriate for painted or plated components. It doesn’t provide the same cooling as water-based. Oil-based allows for an increased temperature which may be required for high-quality finishes.


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Tags: Die Casting, Metal Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Release Agent, Die Casting Lubricant, Die Casting Technical Support, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Tooling Coatings

NADCA News: Die Casting Tooling Coatings & Congress West

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 29, 2017 3:20:39 PM

Video News Update: Coatings for Die Castings: Conventional Coating Processes

From the November 29, 2017 Newsletter: 

Video News Update: Coatings for Die Castings: Conventional Coating Processes



The material presented in this video are some highlights from NADCA’s online webinar - Coatings for Die Castings: Conventional Coating Processes - presented by Stephen Midson of The Midson Group. Conventional coatings (nitriding, carbonitriding) have been used for some time on die casting dies. This introductory webinar will review these processes, and describe die failure mechanisms (soldering, erosion) they are used to address.

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Tags: Die Casting, Metal Casting, Aluminum Die Casting Process, Die Casting Release Agent, Die Casting Lubricant, Die Casting Technical Support, Aluminum Die Casting, Die Casting Tooling Coatings

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend metalworking fluids that suit your needs. Products that represent the latest in technology and ongoing research that enhance competitiveness and increase productivity.

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We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy." Metalworking fluids, Die casting and squeeze casting lubricants, Casting operations products, Water glycol, Trim press lubricants, Surface protection for casting storage, Corrosion protection for die storage, Cleaners for machines and dies, Corrosion protection for machines, Heat treatment quenchants, and Heat-transfer fluids. Also, Industrial lubricants Griflube®, Hydraulic fluids with fire-resistant and anti-wear properties, Bio-Syn natural ester-based hydraulic fluid, and Way oil knuckle lubes.

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