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The Hill and Griffith Company's News Blog

AFS Foundry in a Box Teaches 6th Graders How to Pour Metal Castings (Clone)

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Tue, Nov 08, 2016 @ 02:10 PM

describe the imageThanks to the American Foundry Society Newsletter: March 18, 2015

Sixth graders at Oakridge Upper Elementary School, Muskegon Mich., dug their hands in sand to build molds to make castings last week as part of an AFS Foundry in a Box demonstration. Reg Crowe, retired, Jill Koebbe, Air & Water Compliance Group, Jeff Cook, Eagle Alloy Inc., and Rob Kriger, Eagle Alloy Inc., led students in Mrs. Rikki Grave’s 6th grade science class on Friday, March 13, showing them how to make a sand mold, pour molten tin, remove the sand from the solidified casting and clean the casting’s surface. Since its inception, the Foundry in a Box has been utilized at events and schools throughout the country. For more information on Foundry in a Box, click here.

The American Foundry Society is a not-for-profit organization formed in 1896. With its headquarters in Schaumburg, Ill., AFS provides members and consumers with information and services to promote and strengthen the metalcasting industry.

AFSFoundryinaBox

Student participates in Foudnry in a Box demostration.


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Tags: Metal Casting, Casting Solutions, Foundry In A Box

AFS Foundry in a Box Teaches 6th Graders How to Pour Metal Castings

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Wed, Mar 18, 2015 @ 06:55 PM

describe the imageThanks to the American Foundry Society Newsletter: March 18, 2015

Sixth graders at Oakridge Upper Elementary School, Muskegon Mich., dug their hands in sand to build molds to make castings last week as part of an AFS Foundry in a Box demonstration. Reg Crowe, retired, Jill Koebbe, Air & Water Compliance Group, Jeff Cook, Eagle Alloy Inc., and Rob Kriger, Eagle Alloy Inc., led students in Mrs. Rikki Grave’s 6th grade science class on Friday, March 13, showing them how to make a sand mold, pour molten tin, remove the sand from the solidified casting and clean the casting’s surface. Since its inception, the Foundry in a Box has been utilized at events and schools throughout the country. For more information on Foundry in a Box, click here.

The American Foundry Society is a not-for-profit organization formed in 1896. With its headquarters in Schaumburg, Ill., AFS provides members and consumers with information and services to promote and strengthen the metalcasting industry.

AFSFoundryinaBox

Student participates in Foudnry in a Box demostration.


The Hill and Griffith Company is proud to have contributed to the AFS Foundry-In-A-Box educational project. We're known for our hands on approach with foundry and die casting release agents and supplies. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Metal Casting Products

Tags: Metal Casting, Casting Solutions, Foundry In A Box

AFS Staff Introduce Metalcasting to 5th and 6th Graders

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Wed, Feb 11, 2015 @ 07:24 PM

describe the imageThanks to the American Foundry Society Newsletter: February 11, 2015

The goal of GEMS events is to educate girls about careers in those fields and introduce them to female role models from the different industries. To demonstrate the basic concepts of metalcasting and what takes place in a metalcasting facility, AFS gave the popular Foundry-in-a-Box demonstration to the participants. Each participant got to pour their own metal casting to take home as a keepsake from their experience. Eight AFS employees - Laura Moreno, Sue Thomas, Laura Kasch, Valerie Stramaglia, Katie Matticks, Jennifer Head, Shelly Dutler and Jennifer Morton, - all helped facilitate the demonstrations at the 2015 GEMS conference at James B. Conant High School, Hoffman Estates, IL. Other GEMS presenters included women from the American Chemical Society, Kraft Foods, and Women Leaders in Action. Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., AFS is a not-for-profit technical and management society that has existed since 1896 to provide and promote knowledge and services that strengthen the metalcasting industry for the ultimate benefit of its customers and society.

FullSizeRender

Eighty-five fifth and sixth grade girls were given a metalcasting presentation on Feb. 7, as part of Illinois High School District 211’s Fifth Annual GEMS (Girls in Engineering, Math and Science) Conference.


The Hill and Griffith Company is proud to have contributed to the AFS Foundry-In-A-Box educational project. We're known for our hands on approach with foundry and die casting release agents and supplies. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Metal Casting Products

Tags: Metal Casting, Casting Solutions, Foundry In A Box

Chapter Demonstrates Metalcasting at Grade School Maker Camp

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Thu, Aug 28, 2014 @ 04:24 PM

describe the imageThanks to the American Foundry Society Newsletter: August 28, 2014

In July, the AFS Birmingham Chapter participated in Maker’s Camp at Trace Crossings Elementary School, Hoover, Ala., to demonstrate the metalcasting process with Foundry in a Box, a kit that allows students to create their own castings from pressing the oil-based sand into a small matchplate mold, melting tin in a microwave oven and safely pouring the molten metal into the mold.

Members of the chapter helped 80 students from kindergarten through fourth grade produce a casting that they could wear home as a necklace.

Maker’s Camp at Trace Crossings Elementary School provides students a venue to engage in a variety of "maker" experiences. Along with metalcasting, students explored engineering design, game making, electric company circuits, new technology innovations, and beginning robotics.

The Maker Movement is a current name for facilitated, hands-on learning experiences that engage students of all ages. The movement finds real-world ways to spark creativity and purpose in learning science, technology, engineering, art and math.

The school and Samford University worked collaboratively to provide a unique experience for students of parents who were seeking a creative outlet over the summer break. According to Trace Crossings Elementary, the excitement and end results were contagious. Plans are being made for a teacher professional development "Makers Fair" this fall and to repeat the summer camp again next year.

AFS Maker Camp 

Photo: AFS Birmingham Chapter members Jon Montgomery, Rex Heat Treating (with his daughters Jamelyn and Aubrie); Johnny Williams, Alabama Art Castings; and Hai Nguyen and Kelly McCool, both students at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, helped demonstrate metalcasting at the Maker’s Camp.


The Hill and Griffith Company is proud to have contributed to the AFS Foundry-In-A-Box educational project. We're known for our hands on approach with foundry and die casting release agents and supplies. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Metal Casting Products

Tags: Metal Casting, Casting Solutions, Foundry In A Box

Causes & Fixes for SCC Bug Holes

Posted by Lauren Campbell on Tue, Jul 08, 2014 @ 03:12 PM

By John Pelicone and taken from Precast Inc. Magazine's May/June 2014 issue. 

For full PreCast Magazine Inc. Issue click here

Like a persistent mosquito, one question has plagued precast concrete producers for years: “How can I eliminate bug holes?” In the past, this question was much harder to answer, because concrete was placed at a stiffer consistency that required excessive vibration. And excessive vibration sometimes caused more bug holes. After the introduction of self-consolidating concrete (SCC), bug holes(ii) became a less common occurrence. Yet, as a recent online industry discussion revealed, this perturbing problem is still with us.
Preventing Bug Holes

 

Let’s focus on production’s tail end

The first thing we all learn about SCC is that it’s a tricky devil to work with. There is no room for error, consistency and control are king, and problems, like bug holes, can have more than one cause.

Most online commentators agree that there are three main causes of bug holes:

• Improper selection and application of form release agents

• Problems with SCC mix design (cement, water content, viscosity, admixtures)

• How SCC is placed in the form

Rather than trying to cover all possible sources of bug holes, I decided, like the online commenters, to focus on form work, placement and form release agents. Attempting to cover complex SCC mix-design issues would be too unwieldy for one article(iii).

Two types of release agents

Chemically reactive agents: When a chemically reactive form release agent is used, a nonviolent chemical reaction takes place when fatty acids react with free lime on the surface of fresh concrete. This reaction results in the formation of a metallic soap, a slippery material that allows air bubbles to rise along the vertical surface. This “soapy” film also prevents the hardened concrete from adhering to the forms during stripping.

Barrier release agents: Thicker coatings on forms are typical of the older barrier-type materials, like heavyweight used motor oil, vegetable oils, diesel fuel and kerosene. Barrier type release agents are less expensive than chemically reactive agents, but they are not generally recommended for reducing SCC bug holes.

A problem with the heavier, thicker barrier agents is that the flowing SCC may actually push the release agent down the vertical face of the form, thereby enfolding or entrapping air pockets that lead to surface bug holes.

International input on SCC bug holes

The following is advice from industry experts on bug hole causes and remedies.

Juan Manuel Pereira, Concrete Quality Software, Spain (concrete-quality.com)

“Generally, oils will give the worst finish, especially if applied in excess. Use a wax-based mold-release agent in a thin layer (like polishing furniture), which gives excellent results. They are more expensive, but, when you do the math, the cost per square foot is negligible. Maintaining good form condition is also important.”

Jeff Bishop, precast division manager, Nox-Crete, Nebraska (noxcrete.com)

“Too often, the form release application equipment is inferior, the sprayer has a faulty tip, or the equipment fails to maintain the minimum pump pressure to adequately apply a thin coat on the form surface. Not many plant workers will make frequent stops to check or correct the pressure after they have started spraying. We spent three years developing quality pumping and spraying equipment that ensures a consistent, fine spray.

“Sometimes with truck deliveries, the discharge chute gets ahead of the initial hydraulic head formed by flowing SCC; this can cause entrapped air. You have to make sure you are adding concrete to concrete in such a way that the head is maintained. As the SCC flows down the form and up the side of the form, entrapped air is pushed forward, up and out.”

Cecil Wilson, plant manager, Metromont Corp., South Carolina (metromont.com)

“There are three reasons for SCC bug holes – it’s 1/3 form release agent, 1/3 the mix and 1/3 how the concrete was placed. All three potential causes need to be checked systematically, one at a time, so you can pinpoint the problem. It is imperative to pour SCC so that entrapped air has the opportunity to escape(iv).”

Bob Waterloo, technical sales manager, Hill & Griffith Co., Indiana (hillandgriffith.com)

“Training. I’m a huge proponent of training workers on proper application. ‘Thinner is better’ is what I advise plant workers during my training sessions.

“Here’s an analogy: Think about waxing your car. You put on a thin coat and then buff it out; it’s the same with release agents. In fact, the coating should be thinner than a wax finish on a car.

“But do workers always take the time to mop or rub down forms after spraying? Labor is a major expense for all precasters, and the person prepping forms may not follow proper application methods if he knows the forms are needed in production ASAP.”

John Stewart, global business development manager, Ecoratio, The Release Agent Co., Great Britain (ecoratio.com)

“The main thing is to use a good release agent. Where possible, revert to a top-class release agent rather than a mold oil. This will help surface air escape quickly rather than being retained by a thick oil.”

Alexis Borderon, Reval Stainless Steel & Concrete, Italy (reval-stainless-steel.com)

“We have tried coconut oil, fat, oil-free release agents – all kinds of miracle products from world-class salesmen. I certainly learned that whatever product you use, it must be applied in a thin layer, concrete must be poured close to the form, and never let fresh SCC be poured from a height! We never vibrate.”

Sam Strong, president, Strong Products LLC, Michigan (strongproductsllc.com)

“Release agents generally average $7 to $10 per gallon, but specialized applications may call for a more expensive product. A precaster’s cost and time concerns can result in a poor choice of release agent. A cheaper price may look good but can lead to more labor cost down the road after you have product staining and bug holes. Truth is, product reps rarely see forms being wiped-down or mopped according to manufacturer’s instructions, especially at the smaller precast operations.”


Concrete Form Release

Brian Robinson, continuous improvement manager, Humes Pipeline, New Zealand (humes.co.nz)

“You should try a few different mold release oils – diesel-based, bio oil-based, etc. Suppliers should bust your door down to provide some free samples; stay away from your current so-called ‘cheap’ option. A good release agent that works will end up a similar price – if applied sparingly (correctly), it will result in better quality products. It’s a process of elimination; using different release agents will help you determine if the mix has any issues.

“You’ve got to place from one point in the mold and let it flow. We noticed the SCC places better in the mold using about a 150 mm-diameter opening – not a wide-mouth opening. Also, if the concrete needs to fall a considerable height, a tremie pipe or sleeve works well. This prevents segregation and removal of release agent by falling concrete (which also affects the finish) and reduces bug holes. We never need to mechanically vibrate (we outlaw this) but large, deep tanks may need a small amount of rodding (12 mm-diameter ) reinforcing bar, rodded up and down a dozen times at the opposite side of the mold (from where the concrete is placed) to prevent a discolored seam.”

Greg Stratis, manager, Shea Concrete Products, Massachusetts (sheaconcrete.com)

“We don’t use external vibration for our SCC products – you can quickly over-vibrate the mix. We use SCC on 95% of our product. A lot of our products are vaults with reinforced 3-in. or 6-in. walls. Our SCC design is 5,000 psi with 26-in. spread.

“We are able to get a smooth finish without vibration. In my opinion, if bug holes are present on our product using this mix, it is usually due to too much form oil or a change in our oil consistency. But generally, I would say that the cleanliness of the form and the quality of the release agent used are critical to preventing finish bug holes in the concrete surface.”

Claudio Subacchi, director of R & D, Hawkeye Pedershaab, Iowa (hawkeyepedershaab.com)

“To make sure it is not your release agent, try to make a pour after waxing the surfaces. Sometimes fatty acids (probably the form release agent) generate some bug holes. For wax, we do not use an oil-based one and avoid ones that have beeswax, because they have sugar residues that can potentially cause other kinds of problems. We use a very thin layer of carnauba oil and let it dry, and then cast. If the bug holes go away, then it is your release agent; if not, ask your admixture supplier for a defoaming agent.

“Typically on large architectural surfaces, you do not want to have the SCC travel more than half a meter on a 40 mm-thick pour. If that happens, you may not have bug holes, but you get a shadow from the release agent. See my video for a demonstration(v).”

Todd Leber, chief inspector, Nebco Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska (nebcoinc.com)

“We have had success using two form release agents casting SCC. The key is to apply it as thin as possible. Contact your local distributor to find the right material for your application.”

So in conclusion, let’s summarize the industry’s consensus from for preventing SCC bug holes in three points:

• Use the thinnest application possible of a quality form-release agent, using superior sprayer equipment (pumpers maintained at proper pressure and sprayer tips/nozzles in good condition);

• Maintain proper SCC placement from one pour location in the form, remembering that a slower placement rate allows entrapped air to escape; and

• Maintain forms in clean condition.

John Pelicone

John Pelicone is a private consultant for Big River Industries Inc. and has worked in concrete materials, testing and sales in the precast and prestressed industry for more than 40 years. Contact him at pelicone@bellsouth.net or (770) 682-9896.

Endnotes

ii According to PCA (Portland Cement Association), “The ever-increasing use of structural concrete as an architectural building material has catapulted quality in surface appearance to a prominent position within the concrete construction industry. One of the primary influences affecting the surface aesthetics of concrete is bug holes. Bug holes are surface voids that result from the migration of entrapped air (and to a lesser extent water) to the fresh concrete-form interface. These surface defects manifest themselves mostly in vertical surfaces.”http://www.cement.org

iii See: SCC Part I (characteristics, aggregates and equipment) and Part II (troubleshooting and test methods) in Precast Inc. magazine, January-February and March-April 2014 for detailed information on mix design and control of free water.

iv Best Practices Guidelines for Self-Consolidating Concrete, prepared by the Ready Mixed Concrete Association of Ontario, January 2009, page 10. RMCAO recommends: “For large vertical elements care should be taken not to fill the formwork too rapidly. The placement rate should be slowed to the point that there is sufficient time for the entrapped air to rise to the concrete surface. Since air movement can only take place when the SCC is itself moving into the formwork, slowing the placement rate may assist in removing unwanted air pockets at the formed face of the concrete.”

v See video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8luoYe1Fqg Contact Claudio Subacchi of Hawkeye-Pedershaab at: Claudio Subacchi <csubacchi@hawkeye-pipe.com>



learn more about Grifcote products

 

The Hill and Griffith Company is known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Metal Casting Products

Tags: Hill and Griffith, Die Casting Release Agents, Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agents, Casting Solutions

New Safety Data Sheet Regulations for Concrete Form Releases

Posted by Lauren Campbell on Mon, May 12, 2014 @ 04:31 PM

The New Globally Harmonized System: The Right to Know

Are you or your employees at risk?

By Bob Waterloo, published in the March/April 2014 issue of PRECAST INC.

New rules, new regulations for concrete form releases. It seems that we are faced with these on an almost daily basis. If you are not up to date, you and your employees could be at risk, and your company could be facing penalties. The United States, in conjunction with other nations, has agreed to new rules regarding employee rights and need to know concerning hazardous materials (previously covered in Material Safety Data Sheets, or MSDSs). The new reference will be called Safety Data Sheets (SDSs).

We use many materials in the precast industry, and many of them have given us better castings – but always at a price. That price often comes in the form of special care and handling of materials that are classified as hazardous, including those that are considered flammable or combustible, or cause irritation, sensitivity, corrosion, and are proven or suspected carcinogens. Part of our responsibility is to help reduce the threat, whether minor or serious, to our workers and the environment. OSHA commonly refers to it as “the right to know.”

You are probably already aware of the new rules and regulations regarding SDSs and the training necessary to comply with the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS). This applies not just to precast suppliers, but the precast producer is also responsible for complying with certain regulations including training.

GHS Label Elements

In making a brief survey of precast and pipe producers, I found that while they are generally somewhat aware, most do not realize the full scope of the new regulations. Here is a quick overview of the GHS.

First, the MSDS is a thing of the past. It is now being replaced by the SDS, and while the format is very similar, there are some significant changes. You will need to have SDSs from all of your suppliers. Some states will have additional requirements, although they are not necessarily addressed here. 

June 1, 2015, is the time for everything to be in place. An additional review of the policies will occur June 1, 2016, after which there may be additional changes. However, some of the laws are already in effect. If you are not in compliance with them yet, you will need to move quickly. 

The Employer is responsible for:  

  • Identifying and maintaining a list of hazardous chemicals known to be present at the plant

  • Obtaining, keeping up to date and providing employee access to SDSs

  • Being sure that all hazardous materials are properly labeled

  • Presenting a training program for all employees who will be exposed to these hazardous materials

  • Having a written hazardous communication program in place

  • Having SDS information available to employees and ensuring they have access to the company training program

  • Ensuring that employees read and understand the SDSs and the label on the containers of all hazardous material

Perhaps the first area of concern to producers is the fact that employee training of the new GHS was to be completed by Dec. 1, 2013. If you haven’t already done so, now is the time to do it. 

Your training program must include:

  • The requirements of the standard

  • Places where hazardous chemicals are present in your work area

  • The location and availability of the written program, the chemical inventory and the SDSs

  • How to access the SDSs in your work area

  • How to read the SDSs

  • How to read the GHS-style container labels

  • Any specific labeling used in-house if different from the standards

  • Specific hazardous chemicals in the employees’ immediate work areas

  • How to detect the presence of a release of a hazardous chemical

  • The physical and health hazards of those chemicals

  • Measures you can use to protect yourself against these hazards

  • Required personal protective equipment (PPE) available and how to use it 

Next, you must have a written program and a list of all SDSs spelled out in the program. All SDSs must be in English (worldwide), and additional languages also must be available to convey to employees in their native language or a language they understand. The manufacturer of the hazardous material is responsible only for supplying the SDS in English, so you are responsible for any additional languages.

Materials that fall under the GHS include: 

  • Health hazards

  • Physical hazards

  • Environmental hazards 

  • Hazards not other classified

  • Other hazardous chemical 

Hazard Warning Levels

Any material falling under the “hazardous” classification must have the following information on the label:

• Product identification
• Pictogram
• Signal word
• Hazard statement(s)
• Precautionary statement(s)
• Name, address and telephone number of the chemical 
manufacturer, importer or other              responsible party 

Hazard Warning Labels

While there is no specific format for the label, all of the above must be clearly shown. Pictograms are also required for quick identification of the hazard. On the SDS itself, there will now be a total of 16 sections – all of which must be completed for any material that falls under the hazardous classification: 

1. Identification

2. Hazard(s)identification

3. Composition/information on ingredients

4. First-aid measures

5. Firefighting measures

6. Accidental release measures

7. Handling and storage

8. Exposure controls/personal protection

9. Physical and chemical properties

10. Stability and reactivity

11. Toxicological information

12. Ecological information

13. Disposal considerations

14. Transport information

15. Regulatory information

16. Other information (including date of preparation or last revision) 

As a final note, all hazardous materials in your workplace must be cross-referenced by supplier and/or manufacturer.

These new OSHA regulations place an additional burden not only on the manufacturer/distributor, but also on the end user– you! Owners and operators are now responsible for keeping employees aware of any hazardous material on the premises, and all new employees must go through this training before being allowed in the workplace. OSHA will likely ask about the GHS in your workplace and assess stiff fines for not being in compliance.

The National Precast Concrete Association offers its members a free webinar titled “Webinar: Guide to Globally Harmonized System Documentation” by logging on to precast.org/ education.
Concrete Form Release SDS paper 3-14 

Bob Waterloo is Technical Sales Manager, Concrete Release Agents, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Cincinnati. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com

The online Precast Inc. magazine article is available at: precast.org/2014/03/new-globally-harmonized-system-right-know/.

For a PDF of this article, click here or on the image.


learn more about Grifcote products

 

The Hill and Griffith Company is known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Metal Casting Products

Tags: Hill and Griffith, Concrete, Concrete Form Release Agents, Casting Solutions

CASTEXPO 2013 Predicts Bright Future for Casting Solutions

Posted by Samantha Farris on Tue, May 07, 2013 @ 09:26 AM

Reports from around the web: 


Metalcasting Industry Comes Alive at CastExpo’13, American Foundry Society

Hill and Griffith Casting Solutions booth2

The American Foundry Society (AFS) hosted CastExpo’13 at the America’s Center in St. Louis, April 6-9. The event featured more than 450 exhibitors on a sold-out show floor and various technical presentations as part of its Metalcasting Congress and a Metalcasting Technology Theatre on. A total of 7,192 metalcasters attended CastExpo’13.

“So much was happening on the show floor and a positive vibe filled the air,” said Jerry Call, AFS executive vice president. “It’s great to see all of the positive feedback we have already received from CastExpo’13 attendees and exhibitors.” In addition to the exhibitors, top industry award winners were honored at the show.

The 118th Metalcasting Congress will be held April 8-11, 2014, at the Renaissance Hotel & Convention Center, Schaumburg, Ill., and the 119th Metalcasting Congress will be April 21-23, 2015, at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in Columbus, Ohio.

Read more.


Check out the latest videos, interviews, and impressions of the show, Foundry-Planet Ltd.

CASTEXPO 2013 Casting Solutions resized 600

CastExpo 2013 in St. Louis, Mo., Video, Watch Video.

The U.S. metal casting industry is on an upward rise and evidence of this excitement was displayed at the CastExpo'13. The exceptionally well-organized event was hosted by the AFS and held at the America's Center in St. Louis April 6 – 9. A record 7,192 metal casters attended the show, according to the AFS, and 450 exhibitors displayed their latest technology and equipment at the show. More than 170-featured presentations were held parallel to the event as well as the World Technical Forum. “So much was happening on the show floor and a positive vibe filled the air,” said Jerry Call, AFS executive vice president. “It’s great to see all of the positive feedback we have already received from CastExpo’13 attendees and exhibitors.”

Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., AFS is a not-for-profit technical and management society that has existed since 1896 to provide and promote knowledge and services that strengthen the Metalcasting industry for the ultimate benefit of its customers and society.

The web site has a collection of all the company videos posted on YouTube.

Read more.


LinkedIn: Foundry and Diecaster Network

"Pre-Registration numbers look great, over 6000 and counting," Thomas Prucha, AFS V. P. Techncial Services, Greater Detroit Area.

"What was your favorite moment/moments from CastExpo13? It's a tough call, but I think mine is Gene Muratore's rousing Hoyt Lecture. As he declared, metalcasting IS a technical industry. Coming a close second are all the discussions with exhibitors who made a deal over the course of the four day show. It's wonderful to hear about metalcasters investing in their future," Shannon Wetzel, Experienced editor, Greater Chicago Area.

Read more.


O’Fallon Casting Wins AFS/Metalcasting Design & Purchasing Casting Competition, American Foundry Society

The American Foundry Society (AFS) and its publication Metal Casting Design & Purchasing magazine announced O’Fallon Casting, O’Fallon, Mo., as the winner of the 2013 Casting Competition. The metalcaster won with its electronics housing produced for the defense industry. The component’s elegant design and incredible detail exemplifies the capabilities of the investment casting process.

Read more.

Hill and Griffith Casting Solutions booth3 resized 600

Carley Foundry, Blaine, Minn., was a Best in Class winner for its 750-lb. aluminum radar casting produced via the nobake sand casting process. Converted from machined plates welded together, the design resulted in a 67% reduction in part cost and enabled the end user to realize a substantial tooling cost savings.


Green Marketing - How to make your plant LEED Platinum Certified, Lohre & Associates

vw chattanooga plant resized 600 resized 600

A recent visit to CASTEXPO 2013 in St. Louis encouraged us to investigate what it would take to make a foundry LEED Platinum. A VW ad on 60 Minutes gave us the inspiration.

From the VW press release, "Volkswagen’s Chattanooga manufacturing plant has received a Platinum Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) green building certification program. The facility is the first and only automotive manufacturing plant in the world to receive the Platinum certification."

With planning and a corporate education plan, high levels of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) can be achieved. LEED was created by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) in 1993 to encourage sustainable building practices. The USGBC is a non-governmental organization. It has become accepted as the sustainable building certification standard by the U.S. Government. All government buildings are required to be LEED Certified. LEED is based on a 100-credit system and broken up into five categories: Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, and Indoor Environment Quality.

We'll review each of these and provide examples we learned at CASTEXPO 2013 and other significant corporations. We're using as our example a typical manufacturing plant's features and characteristics. To follow along, download the LEED Checklist we used as our guide to achieve LEED Platinum writing this blog. With careful planning, patience, learning and follow through companies can achieve this high level of sustainability with a very low investment and significant savings over the life of the facility. We achieved LEED Platinum Certified at our office for $12 per square foot including the USGBC fees. And it's been the best Green Marketing investment we could ever make.

Read more.



Die Casting Congress 2013The Die Casting Congress & Tabletop will be September 16-18, 2013, at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville, KY. During the three days of Congress sessions, technical and management presentations will be given by experts from around the world. These presentations will expose metalcasters to the latest technology, ongoing research and successful management tools that will assist companies in enhancing their competitiveness.

Read more.

Hill and Griffith Casting Solutions booth resized 600

We encourage you to put the knowledge and experience of Hill and Griffith's highly trained technical personnel to work for you, please stop by booth 315.

Tags: Hill and Griffith, Metal Casting, Casting Solutions, Die Casting Congress, American Foundry Society, CASTEXPO, Foundry Planet

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