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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Poundfield Precast Concrete Products Video Review

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Sep 21, 2018 9:18:09 PM

Poundfield Products Limited is a precast concrete manufacturer situated in the heart of Suffolk, England.

Founded in 1999 by Mark Jardine, whose experience is working firstly on the family farm, and later in a compost and recycling business led to the design of the industry leading Alphabloc, an innovative precast concrete retaining walling system that was quite simply quicker, and easier to install than any competing products.

Precast-Concrete-Production-Factory-Aerial


Soon after, a complimentary range of prestressed panels was introduced, primarily for the agricultural market. Used in combination with the Alphabloc, it provides a wide offer for grain storage and division. As the applications of the concrete products increased, as did the market for which the products appealed. Seeing growth in waste management, construction, ports and shipping.

Precast-Concrete-Production-Factory-Grain-Divider

Today our product innovations, and wide breath of experience in providing pre-cast solutions benefits the demands across a variety of industries. As well as the Alphabloc, our product range includes the L-Bloc, prestressed panels, Shuttabloc, Taperbloc XL, Betaloc XL, Block and Beam Flooring, culverts and many other Bespoke Concrete cast products. All our products have the option of specialist finishes, from a simple, exposed aggregate right through to complex impressions designed to naturally blend in with its surroundings.

Precast-Concrete-Production-Factory-Production-Capacity

Inline, heated production area, makes production possible throughout the year, whatever the weather, producing up to 200 cubic meters per day. We offer bespoke molds ranging from simple one off cost in timber, using the most up to date plywood produced by our own highly experienced team of carpenters.

Precast-Concrete-Production-Factory-Release-Agent-Application

Through to fully engineered steel molds, that are capable of producing an unlimited number of repeat casts. We work closely with industry experts in supplying admixtures in mix designs. This allows us to produce concrete, that is tested by means of slump or flow testing to exacting standards.

Precast-Concrete-Production-Factory-Yard

This process also allows us to produce a consistent mix, which in turn produces a matching standard of color in our units. Poundfield Manufacturing site is strategically located in Suffolk, with easy links to major trunk roads. But our products are also produced under license throughout the world, ensuring that we can get your product to you when you wanted it.

Poundfield Concrete Products, retaining walls specialists leading the way in product innovation.


Resources from Google News

Introducing The Precast Podcast: An Audio Account of Shea Concrete Product's History and Quest for Continuous Improvement

Second Los Angeles investor takes controlling stake in Fabcon


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete casting supplies, Concrete Form Release Application, concrete form release, Concrete Form Release Agent, form release

Article review: "U.S. Skills Gap is Hurting Manufacturing"

Posted by Carlos Gonzalez on Sep 13, 2018 12:51:47 PM

With a growing concern around the nations skills gap, companies look for a root cause. Guest post by Carlos Gonzalez with New Equipment Digest Magazine.

In 2017, the Committee for Economic Development (CED) embarked upon a “listening tour” of business leaders and parents to discuss firsthand information about workplace demands and aspirations for high school graduates. The listening tour made stops in five communities over the course of a year: Oakland, Calif.; Westfield, Mass.; Tupelo, Miss.; Marysville, Ohio; and Norfolk, Va.

Manufacturing is one of the main industries represented in the communities selected for the study and is a field that employs high school graduates without a higher-education degree. CED brought business leaders and parents together to figure out how they could make students ready to enter in-demand fields such as manufacturing, directly out of high school.

Cindy Cisneros, vice president of education programs at CED, explains the methodology of the study and how both parents and business leaders can contribute to career readiness for high school students.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-4

A builder on site discusses work with an apprentice. By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the economy are projected to require postsecondary education and training beyond high school.

How did CED choose the communities for the listening tour?

The five cities were chosen on the basis of achieving a diversity of geography, community demographics, and industry in which to conduct the focus group discussions. CED also drew from its broad network of member partners across the country to help identify sites. Invitations were extended to 10 business leaders who are representative of the regional economy, as well as 10 parents with children of varied age ranges from middle and high school. 

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-2

An engineer teaches his student how to use a TIG welding machine. The skills gap can cost employers up to $23,000 a year per unfilled position.

Why does career readiness matter?

Career readiness has a long and somewhat complicated history in the United States. Following generations of pendulum swings from vocational tracking to college-for-all, recent years have seen an attempt to shift toward a more nuanced approach of preparing students for both college and a career.

Why this shift toward a middle ground? Despite some indications that our education system is improving following decades of standards-based reform, data show that too many young people in America are floundering. In the K-12 system, high school graduation rates are on the rise overall, yet attainment gaps persist: 88% of White students graduate within four years. However, their Black peers graduate at a rate of just 75%, and their Hispanic peers at a rate of 78%.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-3

A construction trainee learns technical skills on the job with her tutor. One report examining middle market companies found that 44% of executives report lacking candidates with the right skills.

Why do these figures matter?

By 2020, 65% of all jobs in the economy are projected to require postsecondary education and training beyond high school (35% at least a Bachelor’s degree, 30% some college or an Associate’s degree). Yet, if the attainment rates mentioned above hold steady, the supply of qualified candidates will fall short. Reports from employers already point to a skills gap, meaning a mismatch between the knowledge and skills of prospective employees and the competencies needed for available jobs.

U.S.-Skills-Gap-Hurting-Manufacturing-1

Two students work together on an engine in mechanical school. A national study found that 77% of employers believe that soft skills are just as important as technical, or hard, skills.

How can parents and business leaders help students develop these soft skills before they enter the workforce?

Both groups brainstormed a number of strategies to help students refine their soft skills while simultaneously strengthening their technical skills. All five communities supported the notion of work-based learning as a key to success. Discussions focused on providing students with opportunities to experience the full continuum, beginning as early as elementary school: awareness, exploration, preparation, and training. For example, the Marysville, Ohio community agreed that they could help school adapt goals to provide exposure to a future work life by allowing businesses to host career fairs and provide internships to high school students.

Implementing these ideas must begin with coordination and communication between parents and the business community, as well as collaboration with schools, in order to give students what they need to find and keep good jobs once they cross the graduation stage and enter the workforce.

(Click here to read the entire article.)

About CED

The Committee for Economic Development of The Conference Board (CED) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, business-led public policy organization that delivers well-researched analysis and reasoned solutions to our nation’s most critical issues.

Since its inception in 1942, CED has addressed national priorities to promote sustained economic growth and development to benefit all Americans. CED’s work in those first few years led to great policy accomplishments, including the Marshall Plan, the economic development program that helped rebuild Europe and maintain the peace; and the Bretton Woods Agreement that established the new global financial system, and both the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.


Precast Concrete In Google News:

Precast concrete could mean better local roads in the future

PCI Mid-Atlantic Producer Awarded Contract with James Madison University

Louisiana DOT testing precast concrete ramp


 Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, concrete release agents, Concrete form relase, concrete forms, concrete casting supplies, U.S. Skills Gap

Review of AWWA Standard for Concrete Potable Water Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe & Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Sep 6, 2018 11:04:40 PM

"The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use."

Concrete Pressure Pipr 101

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

I. Introduction

I.A. Background

There are two types of prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe:

(1) the lined-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder lined with concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped directly on the steel cylinder and coated with mortar; and

(2) the embedded-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder encased in concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped on the exterior concrete surface and coated with cement mortar.

The lined-cylinder type, which was first used in the United States in 1942, is furnished in sizes from 16 in. (410 mm) to 60 in. (1,520 mm). The embedded-cylinder type, which was developed later and first installed in 1953, is most commonly manufactured in sizes 48 in. (1,220 mm) and larger. Both types are designed for the specific combination of internal pressure and external load required for the project in accordance with the procedures outlined in ANSI/AWWA C304, Standard for Design of Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe is used for transmission mains, distribution feeder mains, pressure siphons (including river crossings), penstocks, industrial pressure lines, water intake lines, and other applications. In the manufacture of lined-cylinder pipe, the first step is to fabricate and hydrostatically test the steel cylinder with joint rings attached. The cylinder is then lined with concrete to form the core. The concrete is placed either centrifugally, by vertical casting, or by a radial compaction method. The concrete lining is cured and high-tensile wire is wrapped around the core directly on the steel cylinder. For a selected wire size, the tension and spacing of the wire are controlled to produce a predetermined residual compression in the core to meet design requirements. The wrapped core is then covered with a dense premixed mortar coating applied by a mechanical impact method. In the manufacture of embedded-cylinder pipe, the cylinder and joint rings are constructed and tested in the same manner as lined-cylinder pipe. The cylinder is encased in concrete by vertical casting and mechanical vibration to constitute the core. After curing, the wire reinforcement is wound under tension in one or more layers around the outside of the concrete core containing the cylinder, instead of directly on the cylinder. The exterior coating of premixed mortar is placed by impaction. 

Concrete Pressure Pipe Basics

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

4.6.5 Concrete for pipe core.

4.6.5.1 General. The concrete in the cores may be placed by the centrifugal method, by the vertical casting method, or by other approved methods.

4.6.5.10 Placing concrete by vertical casting method. The concrete lining or core shall be cast on-end on a cast-iron or steel base ring with rigid steel collapsible forms for the concrete surfaces. The forms shall be designed to ensure that they will have smooth contact surfaces, tight joints, and that they will be firmly and accurately held in proper position without distortion during the placing of the concrete. The forms shall be designed to allow the pipe core to be removed without damaging the surfaces of the concrete. The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use.

(Remember that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)

The transporting and placing of concrete shall be carried out by methods that will not cause the separation of concrete materials or the displacement of the steel cylinder or forms from their proper positions. Adequate methods of mechanical vibration shall be used to compact the concrete in the forms and to ensure satisfactory surfaces. 


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Retaining Walls: Designing Better Solutions

Precast Concrete Pavement Slabs: Design and Construction Considerations

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, concrete release agents, Concrete form relase, concrete forms, concrete casting supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote LV-50 Plus, Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe, Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Water Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Water Pipe with Steve Smith

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 30, 2018 11:59:55 PM

This video was produced to show how to select a large diameter water transmission main product, by Steve Smith (Pipe Industry Icon)  

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 1

Hello, my name is Steve Smith and I'm with Forterra Pressure Pipe. What I want to talk to you about today is two pipe products. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which is we're looking at right here. Prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, what you see here is you can see the prestressing wire. This is six gauge wire, class three. It's got a tensile range of 252,000 to 282,000. You'll notice that the spacing between the wires, that term today is called the pitch, the pitch of the wire, means the space in between rod wrap to rod wrap. For instance, this looks like it could be a one inch pitch. You'll notice the mortar coating. The mortar coating is one inch over top of the cylinder. Okay. What we're gonna transition to now, I want to show you the difference between the prestressed pipe and what known as the bar wrap pipe.

 

 

This is bar wrap pipe. To the naked eye, one might say they look exactly the same. But you're gonna notice this is rod. It's not prestressing wire, it's rod. Wrapped at about 500 psi, and which it's got a heavy steel cylinder, which differs from the prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, which only has a 16 gauge cylinder.

Bar wrap pipe is rated typically zero all the way up to 250 psi.

The key difference is bar wrap pipe is a semi-rigid design. Semi-flexible if you will, versus prestress, which is a rigid design. So bar wrap pipe does rely on soil side support, much more important than say prestress. What this demonstrates here is the ability to be able to chip out the mortar coating.

Take the rod wraps and basically cut them and bend them out of your way, and this shows the application where we can actually weld a flange in the field.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 3

What makes bar wrap unique, unlike prestress, is prestress, because of the wire wraps, you basically can't cut this pipe and make any modifications, because the wire is under tension. Where versus this pipe, because the rod is not under tension, this is a steel pipe design, it gives you the ability to cut section, this type of bar wrap pipe. If we go to the other side, I'll show you some other examples.

Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe Comparison to Bar Wrapped Pipe 2

What you're looking at here is bar wrap pipe. Notice the rod. What this demonstrates is the ability to take say a 20 foot section of bar wrap pipe, you can literally cut the pipe in half. What you see here, we take the rod wraps and just peel a couple rods back, and what this shows the ability to weld a flange in the field, with the butt strap. That's something, quite frankly, that you could not do with the prestress concrete sonar pipe.

So when it comes to adaptability and repair ability in the field, bar wrap has become a favorite choice here in these. This just demonstrates a harness clamp joint. This is a harness style joint that's been around for many, many years. This is one form of restraint joint.

If we go back over here to the left, obviously this demonstrates our snap ring joint. This is snap ring joint. It's a joint, it was a Price Brothers design joint back in the early '70s, 1973. And it's joint ring we still use today.

We jump to the other side, you can see this is the insert. It basically allows the contractor to push the spigot into the bell. You simply tighten down, loosen a nut and tighten down this bolt. And the term we use, now the snap ring is engaged, means it's locked down. That you can see in this cut out section, because it's smaller diameter, how it locks in the spigot ring and keep it from backing out under thrust conditions.

(Thanks to Steve for the great video. Another thing to remember is that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Get Certified - NPCA’s Plant Certification Program assures a uniformly high degree of excellence

Take Your Career to a New Level With Precast University ® and the Master Precaster Program

Annual NPCA Convention - Oct. 4 – Oct. 6, 2018 – Providence, R.I.


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, concrete release agents, Concrete form relase, concrete forms, concrete casting supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Prestressed concrete water pipe, Bar wrapped concrete water pipr

2017 NSF/ANSI Water Treatment and Component Standards

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 26, 2018 11:02:29 AM

A new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added.

Water is, of course, the liquid molecule that we need to sustain life. Any kind of contaminant in water can be detrimental not only to granting this basic need, but it can wickedly and unnecessarily introduce new health problems and even deter individuals from consuming it. Therefore, it is crucial that public water supplies remain clean while supporting a system by which most people in modern society live. (From the American National Standards institute site.)

Drinking Water System Components



NSF/ANSI 61-2017: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects

This American National Standard sets health effects criteria for water system components, specifically the materials or products that come into contact with drinking water, drinking water treatment chemical, or both and can potentially impart chemical contaminants and impurities. System components covered include protective barrier materials (cements, paints, coatings), joining and sealing materials (gaskets, adhesives, lubricants), mechanical devices (water meters, valves), pipes, plumbing devices, and process media. Most governmental agencies in North America require compliance with NSF/ANSI 61 for water treatment and distribution products.

NSF/ANSI 61-2017 contains the following revisions: exposure and normalization criteria specific to concrete aggregate have been added, a new informative Annex H: Water quality criteria considerations for piping materials in contact with drinking water has been added, language regarding tank covers has been incorporated, allowable volumes of test assemblies have been updated, updated terminology on control samples has been included, lead content requirements have been updated, and updates have been made to several pass/fail values in Annex D on Drinking Water Criteria.


(Warning from  to manufacturers that don't comply with the standard when required. Their blog page.)

The SCAM

ENGINEERS, CONTRACTORS and OWNERS, BEWARE! There are manufacturers out there who continue to try to game the system, but their irresponsibility can easily become YOUR LOSS! Here is an excerpt from the EPA in a summary statement made about the SDWA Section 1417.

Since 1986, the Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA” or “the Act”) has prohibited the use of certain items that are not lead free and since 1996 the Act has made it unlawful for anyone to introduce into commerce items that are not lead free.

ANY MANUFACTURER WHO IS MISLEADING THEIR CUSTOMERS INTO BELIEVING THAT THEIR SYSTEM IS CERTIFIED TO THE STANDARD IS VIOLATING FEDERAL LAW AS OF JANUARY 4, 2014! There is no nice way to say this! Unfortunately, this irresponsible behavior has become commonplace within the industry as there have been many manufacturers who have put off certification believing the enforcement would be low.

I spoke with our third party lab regarding the testing of components and systems and this is what they said:

Manufacturers can request the testing and certification of either a component or system. If a client chooses to only certify a component, then only the component can be labeled and advertised as certified.

To clarify, standard NSF/ANSI 61 addresses several different types of potential contaminants, but not specifically lead content. Low lead requirements are defined separately in three different requirements:

• Federal lead law: “Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act” – Effective January 4, 2014
• California lead law: “The California health & Safety Code 116875”
• NSF/ANSI 372: Standard, not a law, providing test methods.
It is important to note that having compliance to NSF/ANSI 372 does not substitute certification to either the Federal or CA State lead laws.

If a manufacturer has a SYSTEM certification, this will be obvious to the user if they look at the certification document provided by the test laboratory. The QuantumFlo Certification is, without question, perfectly clear.


72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe.

Ameron supplied this 72-inch diameter Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Bar-Wrapped Concrete Cylinder Pipe (CCP) consists of a steel cylinder lined with concrete or cement mortar, then helically wrapped with a mild steel bar and coated with dense cement mortar. CCP is designed and manufactured in accordance with the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standard C303 and AWWA Manual M9, and is normally supplied in standard diameters of 18 to 72 inches for operating pressures up to 400 psi. Pipe has been manufactured in larger sizes and for higher pressures based on the concepts of this standard.


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Louisiana DOT testing precast concrete ramp

New Precast Concrete Educational Courses Highlight Innovative Technologies

Precast concrete barn has all the bells and whistles for 280 Alberta dairy cattle


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, concrete release agents, Concrete form relase, concrete forms, concrete casting supplies, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents

Protect Your Precast Forms with Reactive Release Agents and Rust Preventatives

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 18, 2018 8:17:40 PM

Taking care of your precast concrete forms extends their life and protects a valuable investment.

Precast-Concrete-Careers-6

It starts with day-to-day mainentance. Steel form problems can happen with poor cleaning or excessive use of wire brushes or sandblasting. They can also be damaged by vibrators.

The selection of a good concrete release agent is another important aspect of form care. There are two main types of concrete releases.



Diesel fuel, greases, used motor oil, etc. barrier type products provide a barrier between the form and the concree allowing it to strip. These provided a good release, but cause surface voids, staining, and over all poor finished appearance. They are harder to apply due to their higher viscosity.

precast-concrete-form-maintenance-1

Reactive type are chemically active and contain compounds that react with the free lime in the concrete to produce a soap-like film between the form and the concrete. This type of release agent is the most widely used. They are only require a thin film to produce a stain-free, void-free concrete surfaces. Reactive type release allow the form to strip cleaner.

Proper application of release agents is necessary for economy and for producing the best product possible and for minimizing form clean up.

Another aspect of concrete form care is protection in storage when they are out of service between jobs. The forms need to be protected from rust and corrosion. Some use grease, diesel fuel, or release agent but a rust preventative is a beter choice. For your rust preentative know the quality of protection, length of protection, ease of application, and ease to remove.

Formwork is a big investment for producers. Proper care insures product quality and extends their life. It will make your concrete business more profitable.


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Precast concrete could mean better local roads in the future

Precast concrete barn has all the bells and whistles for 280 Alberta dairy cattle

Senior Living Community Selects Precast Concrete for New Construction


 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, concrete release agents, Concrete form relase, concrete forms, concrete form seasoning, concrete casting supplies, rust inhibitors

Choose the form, and you’ve narrowed the choice of concrete form release agent

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 13, 2018 3:48:59 PM

By Sidney Freedman, Director, Architectural Precast Division, Prestressed Concrete Institute, Chicago, Illinois for a Aberdeen Group Article

The following are a few highlights of the four-page article

"Form release agent must do several jobs: 

  1. Permit clean release of form work from the hardened concrete during stripping
  2. Protect the form work for long life and extensive reuse
  3. Help produce a hard, non-powdery, stain-free concrete surface with a minimum number of defects
  4. Prevent corrosion of steel forms and consequent staining of the concrete surface"
 Best Concrete Release Agent For Different Forms
 
 
"Agents commonly used with various forms

The way a form release agent performs is markedly influenced by the form material. Therefore the release agent should not be chosen until the form material has been selected.
 
  • Wood and plywood forms. For wood forms most of the commercial oils are satisfactory
  • Metal forms. Form release agents that are satisfactory on wood are not always suitable for steel forms. Release agents for steel forms should contain a rust inhibitor and be free of water. Materials that have been used successfully include oil or chemically active release agents.
  • Fiberglass forms or plastic form liners. These forms and plastic form liners can be used a few times without a release agent because of their hard, smooth finish but after a few uses the surfaces become so rough as to necessitate the use of a release agent.
  • Rubber form liners. Most rubber mattings do not require application of release agents if the surface is thoroughly cleaned and moistened with water just before concrete is placed. Some users prefer to coat the rubber with a thin film of vegetable oil
  • Plastic foams. Paraffin oil generally is lightly sprayed over plastic foam forms or form liners. 
  • Concrete forms. Concrete forms, even if they are ground, smoothed and polished, require a release agent to prevent sticking and enable easy stripping. Oils have been used or one or two coats of epoxy resin and then waxed.
  • Corrugated cement-asbestos sheets when used as form liners should have an oil-phased emulsion applied as a release agent. 
  • Fiberboard should be coated with grease having a calcium stearate or aluminum stearate base. Alternatively they can be oiled with a paraffin base oil free of volatile constituents and having a viscosity of not less than 250 Saybolt seconds at 100 degrees F.
  • Plaster molds. When plaster waste molds are thoroughly dry, two coats of white shellac should be applied to the mold surface to make it waterproof and nonabsorbent. Before concrete is placed in it, the mold should be lightly greased with a nonstaining soft yellow cup-grease, white petroleum jelly, or a cup-grease that is thinned by adding a mixture of crystallized stearic acid and kerosene to a point where it can be applied with a brush."
 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, concrete casting supplies, concrete casting, precast concrete, concrete form release for different forms

The Precast Show 2019 is already at 96% capacity!

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 2, 2018 9:41:46 PM

Come join us February 28 – March 2, 2019 in Louisville, Kentucky for the next Precast Show.

Precast Show Logo
 
To view the floor plan and current exhibitor list CLICK HERE. For a snapshot of the last show directory from the Denver 2018 Show CLICK HERE.  As always, contact me if you have questions. We look forward to a successful venue in Louisville!!

Regards, Brenda C. Ibitz, Vice President of Development; National Precast Concrete Association, 1320 City Center Drive, Suite 200, Carmel, Indiana 46032; (800) 366-7731, (317) 571-9500 (phone), (317) 571-0041 (fax), bibitz@precast.org
 

The Hill and Griffith Company Precast Show Booth 2018
 
Mike Lawry, VP Sales & Operations; Bob Waterloo, Director of Distribution; Angela Cox, Technical Representative; Tom Dempsey, Technical Representative; and Barry Morgan, Technical Representative.
 
 
Transcription of the video, "Welcome to The Hill and Griffith Company booth at the 2018 Precast Concrete Show. They're featuring their  Grifcoat and Cast-O-Magic Concrete Form Releases with their "The Perfect Release" theme. The Hill and Griffith Company is one of the largest suppliers of concrete form releases in North America. With its brands of both barrier, and reactive types of form releases that create a metallic soap release that is excellent for controlling bug holes. The show will be open again tomorrow, so we'll see you on Friday at The Hill and Griffith Company booth, Denver Colorado."

Precast Concrete in Google News and NPCA, National Precast Concrete Association

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, concrete casting supplies, concrete casting, precast concrete, precast show, Grifcote, Cast-O-Magic

Happy 5th Anniversary!

Posted by Samantha Farris on Jul 27, 2018 4:04:36 PM

NIJAK 5-YR ANNIVERSARY

On behalf of all of your colleagues here at at The Hill and Griffith Company. We would like to wish you, Donna Nijak a Happy 5th Year Work Anniversary!

Tags: Awards, Employee

NSF Concrete Form Release Agent Evaluation

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 27, 2018 12:40:14 PM

Concrete additives or release agents that contain contaminants, can cause compliance problems for the municipal drinking water utility and present potential health risks to the consumer.

Overview

 

Drinking water contaminants can come from many sources, including the equipment used for water storage and transportation. Concrete used in large storage tanks, reservoirs and pipelines is usually a combination of cement, admixtures, curing compound, sand and gravel. It can also contain fly ash and other additives to strengthen the concrete and increase its durability. However, any of these additives can have contaminants that can cause compliance problems for the utility and present potential health risks to the consumer. If any of these additives can have contaminants that can cause compliance problems for the utility and present potential health risks to the consumer.
 
NSF Certified Form Release
 
 

The following are excerpts pertaining to release agents.
 
5 Barrier materials
 
5.1 Scope 
 
The requirements of this section apply to products and materials intended to form a barrier providing containment of drinking water or to prevent drinking water contact with another surface. The products and materials that are covered include, but are not limited to: coatings and paints applied to fittings, pipes, mechanical devices and non residential storage tanks, linings, liners, bladders and diaphragms, and constituents of concrete and cement-mortar (e.g., Portland and blended hydraulic cements, admixtures, sealers, and mold release agents. These products and materials can be field-applied, factory applied, precast, or cast in place.
 
5.2 Definitions
 
5.2.10 form/mold release agent: A material applied to the inside of a form or mold used to cast concrete or cement-mortar, which prevents adhesion of the concrete or cement-mortar to its surface. 
 
5.5 Extraction Procedures
 
5.5.2.4 Products requiring cement mortar cubes
 
Test sample mortar cubes shall be prepared in accordance to the applicable sections of ASTM C 109. Mix water shall meet reagent water requirements (see Annex B, section B.9.2.1 ). Sand shall be washed in accordance with the procedures in ASTM C 778. Mixing tools and other items coming into contact with the mortar shall be washed with soap and water, rinsed with tap water, rinsed with reagent water, and rinsed with isopropyl alcohol. The mortar shall be placed in polyethylene or polypropylene lined molds; no form release agents shall be used. Specimens shall be removed from the molds after 24 h and placed in glass or polyethylene beakers and covered with an inverted watch glass supported on glass Rebel hooks (or other devices to prevent air seal of the vessel) and placed for 28 d ± 12 h, or fewer as specified by the manufacturer, in a moist cabinet meeting the requirements of ASTM C 511. The specimens shall be removed from the moist cabinet and air dried at 23 ± 2 °C (73 ± 4 °F) and 50 ± 5% relative humidity for 7 d. 
 
5.5.2.4.4 Form and mold release agents
 
These products shall be applied per manufacturer specifications to the mold used during the preparation of the test cubes (see 5.5.2.4 ). 
 
5.5.4 Conditioning (optional)
 
Test samples shall be conditioned immediately after curing. This conditioning procedure simulates the disinfection of water mains and storage tanks prior to placing into service, and is based on AWWA Standards C651-05 and C652-02. Coatings intended for pipes and fittings can be conditioned as follows:
1) prepare 50 mg/L free available chlorine solution using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCI - reagent grade or equivalent);
2) using a spray bottle, spray the previously rinsed test samples, wetting all surfaces to be exposed;
3) let the test samples stand for at least 3 hours; and
4) place the test samples in racks, rinse with cold tap water, and rinse with reagent water, meeting the requirements of Annex B, section B.9.2.1.
 
5.5.5 Exposure protocols
 
For all test samples, exposure shall commence immediately following the conditioning step. If immediate exposure is not possible, the test samples shall be dried in a laminar flow hood and exposed within 4 h. Successful evaluation at an elevated exposure temperature shall preclude testing at a lower exposure temperature. A separate sample shall be exposed for each type of exposure water selected in 5.5.3.
 
The exact surface area-to-volume ratio achieved during the exposure shall be recorded.
 
5.5.5.1 Cold application
 
Cold application product samples, as designated by the manufacturer, shall be placed in an exposure vessel and completely covered with exposure water of the applicable pH (see 5.5.3). The exposure vessel shall be placed in a 23 ± 2 °C (73 ± 4 °F) environment for the duration of the exposure period.

Benefits of NSF Certification

To help minimize the risk of contaminants, NSF certifies individual concrete ingredients to the requirements of NSF/ANSI Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects. Our Concrete Site Mix Design Evaluation Program provides a one-time evaluation that certifies concrete consisting of non-certified cement or other ingredients against this same standard.

NSF/ANSI 61 testing covers all products with drinking water contact from source to tap, and determines what contaminants may migrate or leach from your product into drinking water. It also confirms if they are below the maximum levels allowed to be considered safe.
 
NSF Certification Process

We require information on each ingredient in the site mix and details of its end use structure. Since we have worked with the cement admixture industry for over 20 years, we are able to obtain any additional information on ingredient composition relatively quickly. We perform testing on concrete cylinders manufactured from the mix, including analysis for the potential release of regulated metals, radionuclides, volatile organics and other contaminants that may leach directly into drinking water. Results are typically available in 30 days or less.
 

For additional information, read these articles published in Precast Inc. by the Hill and Griffith Company:
  • "Biodegradability Redefined and Volatile Organic Compounds Update" by Bob Waterloo, Precast Inc.,
    January/February 2010
    Download Article »

  • Biodegradable, NSF Concrete Form Release Agents Offer a Range of Options for Concrete Applications
    Read More »

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Casting Solutions, Concrete Casting Products, concrete casting supplies, concrete casting, precast concrete, concrete-form-release-agent-quality-control, American Concrete Institute, NSF/ANSI 61 Potable Water, potable water tanks

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