Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

How Do You Apply Concrete Release Agent 4 Different Ways?

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 19, 2018 3:31:32 PM

Release agents, when properly used, aid in the stripping process, assist in producing sound defect-free concrete surfaces, simplify form cleaning and increase the working life of quality form surfaces.

There are two main categories of form release agents:

  • Barrier – those that provide a physical barrier between the form and the concrete (such as petroleum-based products, soaps, synthetic resins, waxes)
  • Reactive – those containing fatty acids or other ingredients that react with the free lime in fresh concrete to produce a metallic soap interface between the form and the concrete. Such as proprietary products and vegetable oils that are typically found in petroleum-based carrying agent products.

Applying

Apply concrete release agent to a clean form before the reinforcement has been placed to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently applying it to the reinforcement. If the release agent does come in contact with reinforcement it should be wiped clean before placing the concrete. 

When applying a release agent it is best to follow the manufacturer’s instructions. When too much form release is used, it is not only wasteful and inefficient, but it leads to a number of other associated problems with the finished product. He who holds the wand determines the amount of material being applied, so proper training is crucial. As a rule of thumb, remember: Less is better. The amount needed to affectively coat a form is only about 0.005 inches thick. The actual cover thickness will depend on the application method and viscosity of the product, which is related to the ambient temperature. Typically, the colder it is in the plant, the thicker, or more viscous, the release agent will be. The warmer it is the plant, the thinner, or less viscous, it will be. Different measures can be taken during the application process to account for changes in material temperature (viscosity) throughout the year.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 2 copy.jpg

Spraying

Spraying is probably the most efficient and common method for applying release agents. Keep the wand moving when applying form release. Broad nozzle/flat spray tips have been found to give the thinnest and most uniform cover. It should be noted that as the temperature drops and viscosity increases, the spraying pressure should be increased and the nozzle orifice size reduced. As temperatures rise, reduce pressure and increase nozzle size. It is a good practice to soak or mop up any puddles that may have formed at the bottom of the form Remember: Less is better. Only through experience and training will you learn what works best for your plant’s production line.

Caution: Fatty acids will react with brass, bronze, aluminum, grey ductile and malleable iron and mild steel, as well as some petroleum-based products used for making blockouts and other embedded items. It is best to use stainless steel, nickel or plastic for your spraying systems and to test for possible reaction of embedded materials prior to full implementation.

Application of Precast Concrete Form Oil - 2.jpg

Swabbing and Painting

Swabbing and painting by hand is an acceptable application method, with the benefit of eliminating the majority of airborne particulate. On the negative side, applications tend to be thicker than necessary, leading to wasted material and the potential for additional problems. 

Application of Precast Concrete Form Oil - 3.jpg

Wiping

Wiping is often the method of choice for architectural precasters concerned with a blemish-free surface. Wiping on release agents with a sponge or rag will normally result in the thinnest coating, but it is very labor intensive.

Dipping

Automated dipping systems are fast, labor efficient and ensure complete coverage. Excess material will usually drip back into a holding tank, reducing material waste. The application coat is often thicker than necessary, however, again creating the potential for future problems.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 9 copy.jpg

Seasoning

Reactive form release agents, the most commonly used release agents in precast and pipe production, typically contain fatty acids. Fatty acids are mild acids composed of animal fats and vegetable oils. These fatty acids have a natural affinity for metal. They react with metal to form a protective barrier, which is a coating of metallic oleate. 

This process is known as seasoning. This protective layer prevents further application of fatty acids from migrating to the metal of the form and allows the fatty acid to remain on the surface of the form to react with the free lime on the surface of the casting. Seasoning serves two purposes. First, it enhances the easy separation of the form from the castings. Second, it enables free air to rise more easily on the vertical surfaces of the castings, resulting in fewer surface defects. Seasoning of forms is a very basic requirement to help minimize the amount of labor involved when forms are stripped or pipes are tipped out. If forms, pallets and headers are properly maintained, labor cost and better looking castings are the end result

New forms, pallets and headers will frequently arrive with a protective coating on them to help prevent rusting in transit or until the forms are sold and delivered. In order to season these forms, the protective coating can be removed with solvents or grinding and the form release applied liberally, allowing it to set for a minimum of four hours. A 24-hour period is better, as it allows more seasoning to take place. Also, forms that are exposed to the sun will season more quickly, as higher temperatures increase the reactivity with the metal forms and rings.

Care of Forms and Rings

At times, you may be storing forms inside or outside for short or long periods of time. Release agents can be used to protect this vital equipment from damage. For short-term or long-term storage, a good quality VOC-compliant petroleum solvent-based form release can be used by applying a liberal coating on the form. If the forms are stored outside, even for a short period of time, a quick walk-by is often necessary to ensure that the form release has not washed off from rain. If any evidence of rust is present, apply another coat of the form release on the forms and rings as quickly as possible. A biodegradable form release is preferred, as over-application is desired and some of the material will end up on the ground.

Identifying Potential Problems

Concrete is a highly variable material because it is comprised of raw materials that potentially have a lot of variability. It is often difficult to pinpoint exactly what causes a problem because it may be a combination of a number of factors. The following are two examples of common problems often associated with excessive form release agent coverage.

Staining has been linked to the use of excessive release agents and the use of dirty forms. Dirt, dust, rust or grease can easily be transferred from a dirty form to the finished surface of the concrete product. Once a form has been properly cleaned and coated with release agent, proper measures should be taken to minimize the potential for dust and debris to collect on the form before casting.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 3 copy.jpg

Excessive bugholes occur when barrier-type release agents are applied to heavily. Barrier-type release agents tend to encapsulate free air along the vertical sidewalls, which leads to surface defects. In contrast, the metallic soap formed when using a reactive release agent allows the free air on the vertical walls to rise more easily to the surface. Proper vibration practices also reduces bugholes. The potential for bugholes and staining can be reduced by selecting an application method that produces the thinnest coat of release agent in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Release agent should not be allowed to collect and pool in the forms. Applying a thin coat, wiping up puddles and avoiding contact with reinforcing steel greatly improves the odds of producing a defect-free concrete product.

This article was written by Bob Waterloo, Distributor Manager with the Hill and Griffith Company, for the National Precast Concrete Association's publication Precast Inc.


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete casting supplies, Form Seasoning Concrete Release Agent, Concrete Form Release Application, concrete form release

Automated Block Casting, Concrete Release Agent Application

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 11, 2018 2:24:32 PM

Video Review of an automated machine for forming retaining wall blocks which shows the application of the concrete release agent to the form.
 
This week's post comes from a video produced by CGM Machines and Moulds for Concrete Products
  • CGM block making machines are designed to make vibro-pressed hollow blocks, interlocking blocks, pavers, a variety of special products and custom made-designs.
  • CGM interchangeable moulds are designed to meet any customers’ need and specifications.
  • CGM Block Machines are easy to use, reliable and with a high production capacity.
  • CGM block machines produce high quality products with international standards, drastically cutting down labour costs.

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Automatic-Concrete-Block-Machine-13.jpg

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Precast Concrete Form Release, concrete form release

Article Review: Concrete form release agent surface finish analysis

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jan 4, 2018 5:56:10 PM

Review of an IOP Science Open Access article, "The influence of form release agent application to the quality of concrete surfaces"
 
Abstract

and

The main aim of this article was to obtain concrete form release agent surface finish analysis by the usage of different form release agent application. Secondly, to determine blemishes of concrete surfaces and divide them according to combined method provided by two documents and by using computer program: CIB Report No. 24 "Tolerances on blemishes of concrete", GOST 13015.0–83 and "ImageJ". Two different concrete compositions were made: BA1 (low fluidity, vibration is needed) and BA8 (high fluidity, vibration is not needed). Three castings with each formwork were conducted. Water emulsion based form release agent was used. Different applications (normal and excessive) of form release agent were used on the formwork.
 

1. Introduction

High quality surface finishes are a feature of self- compacting concrete (SCC), but by careful attention to mix design and job site workmanship, nice surfaces with the conventional concrete mixture could be achieved. The appearance of an element mainly depends on: the type of cement and addition used; the mix composition; the quality of the mould and release agent; the placing procedure. If compared self-compacting concrete with the conventional – the color is generally more uniform also it is easier to avoid defects due to leakage spots at the location of mould joints. Blowholes, honeycombing and other blemishes can be found in all types of concrete but with more fluid concrete mixture it is possible to improve the surface finish [1-2]

International Council for Building Research has provided main guidelines how the concrete may be defined referring the surface quality [3-5]:
  • ROUGH class – no special requirements for finishing;
  •  ORDINARY – surface finishing has a minor factor;
  •  ELABORATE – definite requirements for visual appearance;
  •  SPECIAL – highest standards for appearance.

Concrete-Form-Release-Agent-4-Form.jpg Concrete-Form-Release-Agent-3-Form.jpg  Concrete-Form-Release-Agent-1-Form.jpg Concrete-Form-Release-Agent-2-Form.jpg

Figure 1. Formworks used for horizontal specimens

Formworks are also very important factor for concrete surface quality. Scientist J. Sousa Coutinho [6] has made a research using two different formworks: controlled permeability (CP) and five layer wood-based formworks. The results have shown that by using CP formworks the pore diameter (nm) of concrete surface has decreased up to 50 %, porosity – up to 45 %, surface hardness (MPa) has increased up to 70 % and blow-hole ratio has decreased up to 90 % comparing with those concrete surfaces using five layer wood-based formworks.

A number of studies have been made to determine how to achieve better consolidation resulting in fewer surface blemishes [7-15]. To minimize the size and number of bug holes and all other effects, the following practices should be followed: 

  •  Vibration period should be of sufficient duration;
  •  Vibrator insertions should be properly spaced and overlapped and the vibrator removed slowly;
  •  Each concrete layer should be consolidated from the bottom upward;
  •  Vibration periods should be increased on withdrawal when using impermeable forms that permit air trapped at the form surface to escape through joints as between;
  •  Inward sloping forms and other complex design details should be avoided;
  •  Vibrator should penetrate into the previous layer;

The main outcome of this research is to evaluate the usage of different form release agent application on the formwork. In addition, this paper presents a technique which provides:

  • A method how to evaluate the concrete surface quality using image analysis process (software – “ImageJ”;
  • An evaluation of concrete surfaces quality by the following documents: CIB report no. 24 [4] and GOST 13015.0-83.
  • A combined method how to evaluate and divide concrete surfaces into special categories provided by CIB report no. 24 GOST 13015.0-83 and “ImageJ” in respect to the area of blemishes.
2. Materials and technology

JSC “Akmenes cementas” (Lithuania) Portland cement CEM II/A-LL 42.5 R was used for the test.

Kvesu quarry sand with the fraction of 0/4, bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 and fineness module of 1.67 was used as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures. 0/1 sand fraction ( 1460 kg/m3, fineness module 2.37) was also used as fine aggregate. Gravel with the fraction of 4/16 and bulk density of 1327 kg/m3 was used as the coarse aggregate. Granulometric composition of aggregates is conducted according to LST EN 12620:2003+A1:2008.

Two different concrete mixtures were prepared and their compositions are presented in Table 1.

During the research, dry aggregates were used for concrete mixtures. Cement and aggregates were dosed by weight while water and chemical admixture were dosed by volume. Chemical additives in the form of solutions were mixed with water and used in preparation of concrete mixtures. Concrete mixtures were mixed for 3 minutes in the laboratory in forced type concrete mixers.

 Concrete-form-release-Table-1.jpg

Dimensions of the different formworks were as follow:

  •  Wood impregnated with polymeric oil [WPO]: 550 × 300 mm for horizontal specimens;
  •  Wood covered with rubber [WCR]: 400 × 400 mm;
  •  Sawn timber formwork [ST]: 400 × 300 mm.  Plastic formwork [P]: 400 × 400 mm;
  •  Wood impregnated with polymeric oil [WPOV] for vertical specimens:  BA1 with and without excessive release agent and BA8 with excessive release agent – 1240 × 230 mm (1 side). Total measured area – 0.57 m2.  BA8 without excessive release agent – 620 × 460 mm (1 side). Total measured area – 0.57 m2.

“PERI” formwork (wood impregnated with polymeric oil) for the casting of vertical concrete specimens.

The usage of form release agents was different. The aim was to find out the difference of concrete surfaces quality between specimens that were casted with the excessive amount of form release agent and without.

The air content of concrete mixtures was determined by LST EN 12350-7 standard. Flow table test for concrete mixtures was made according to LST EN 12350-5:2009 standard and density of concrete mixtures - LST EN 12350-6.

Vibration table was used for BA1 concrete mixtures. The parameters of vibration table were as follow: amplitude – 0.5 mm; frequency – 50 Hz. Environment conditions: 18 oC of temperature and 65 % of relative humidity. Vibration time was seven seconds. BA8 concrete mixture was not vibrated. 

Concrete specimens were taken out from the formworks after 3 days and cured in 18 temperature dry conditions.  

The evaluation of concrete surfaces was made by three methods:

  •  Method according to CIB Report No. 24 “Tolerances on blemishes of concrete”;
  •  Method according to GOST 13015.0-83 standard;
  •  Method proposed by the authors of this article using computer program – “ImageJ”.

The first method provides information about the concrete surface quality by using seven different reference photographs that illustrate the level of incidence of blowholes in surfaces.

The second method provides information about concrete surfaces according to GOST 13015.0-83 standard. The evaluation is conducted according to the diameter of blowholes.

The third method provides analytical information about the quality of concrete surfaces in respect to the ratio between area of blemishes and whole specimen. First of all, the concrete surface is pictured, that all specimens would be visible. Photos were taken around 30 cm of distance. 

Methodology of an image analysis method “ImageJ”: 

  •  Image of the concrete surface is imported into the “ImageJ” program.
  •  Picture is set to the 8bit quality. This is done to highlight the blemishes of the surface;
  •  Image scale is set to the certain known dimension;
  •  Image colors are changed into the black and white to highlight the blemishes of the surface;
  •  5 mm and bigger diameter blemishes were analyzed;
  •  The areas of surface blemishes are calculated.

Following statistical parameters of blemishes area were calculated: the number of blemishes (N), mean value (MV). Ratio (%) between the area of blemishes (BA) and the area of specimen (SA) is given.

3. Results and discussions

The results of statistical analysis are given at table 2. Blemishes of 5 mm2 or bigger were evaluated. Three castings for each specimen were conducted and the average values are presented.

Concrete-Form-Release-Table-2.jpg

Concrete-Form-Release-Table-3a.jpg

Concrete-Form-Release-Table-3.jpg

On the basis of the evaluation of concrete surfaces (table 4), it was necessary to divide concrete surfaces into groups. According to these three documents all the research results were divided as follow at table 5.  

Concrete-Form-Release-Table-5.jpg

4. Conclusions

1. The quality of concrete surface was differently affected by the application of form release agent. Generally, the usage of excessive release agent resulted in more porous concrete surfaces. On the other hand, those pores became very tiny and therefore the total area of pores decreased (vertical BA1 specimens: 0.75 % to 0.55 %). The usage of excessive form release agent for vertical specimens of BA8 concrete mixture resulted in more porous concrete surfaces as well and the total area of blemishes in respect to whole specimen’s surface area increased from 0.18 % to 0.36 %.

2. Generally, higher quality concrete surfaces were obtained by using more fluid concrete mixtures (BA8). Horizontal specimens that have been formed of BA8 concrete mixture were named as special, because they almost did not possess any surface blemishes (despite the different application of form release agent). The excessive form release agent application resulted in worse surface quality of horizontal specimens of BA1 concrete mixture (increased the number and area of surface blemishes).

5. References

[1] The European Guidelines for Self-Compacting Concrete 2005 Specification, Production and Use

[2] Lemaire G, Escadeillas G, Ringot E 2005 Evaluating concrete surfaces using an image analysis process. Construction and Building Materials 19. pp 604–611

[3] Menard J P 1999 La qualite pour tous les usages. Construction Moderne 101. p 12

[4] CIB Report no. 24, commission W29 1973 Tolerances on blemishes of concrete

[5] AS 3610 Formwork for concrete 1995 Standards Australia. pp 12–21

[6] Coutinho J S 2001 The Effect of Controlled Permeability Formwork (CPF) on white concrete. ACI Materials Journal. Vol. 98. No. 2 pp 148–171

[7] Hurd M K 1996 Choosing and Using Form Release Agent PUBLICATION #C960732

[8] Information has been used from the following website http://rsbweb.nih.gov/ij/ on 02 02 2012.

[9] Price W F 2000 Controlled Permeability Formwork. CIRIA Report C511 p 102

[10] Duggan T 1992 Enhancing Concrete Durability Using Controlled Permeability Formworks 17th Conference on Our World in Concrete and Structures. Singapure. pp 57–62

[11] ACI 309.1R 2008 Behavior of Fresh Concrete During Vibration. ACI Committee 309, technical committee document 309.1R-08 p 18

[12] ACI 309R 2005 Guide of Consolidation of Concrete. ACI Committee 309, technical committee document 309R-05 p 35

[13] Information has been used from the following website www.cement.org on 24 03 2012

[14] Price W F 2000 Controlled Permeability Formwork. CIRIA Report C511 p 102

[15] Duggan T 1992 Enhancing Concrete Durability Using Controlled Permeability Formworks. 17th Conference on Our World in Concrete and Structures. Singapure pp 57–62


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete casting supplies, concrete form release

The Inquisitive Mind: Jodi Zwart, Master Precaster

Posted by Mason Nichols on Dec 21, 2017 7:19:27 PM

 

Jodi Zwart’s love of learning offers unlimited potential to Woodard’s Concrete Products.


Take Your Career to a New Level With Precast University ® and the Master Concrete Precaster Program

NPCA’s program will help position you for continued career advancement in the precast industry. Offered as part of NPCA’s Precast University, the program includes precast-specific training with comprehensive education courses for production, safety, technical, quality control and leadership. Developed in conjunction with industry experts, producers, departments of transportation and academia, the Precast University curriculum is a perfect complement to employees new to the industry needing a broad knowledge base and to those employees with precast experience who want to take the next step in their careers. For more information on Precast University and the Master Precaster program, download our brochure.

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Master Precaster

Concrete Form Release Selection

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 14, 2017 10:12:13 PM

 

Industry-Leading Performance and Quality Release Agents


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Bio Gold Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, concrete form release, FR-50

Concrete Form Release Definitions

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Dec 7, 2017 3:12:18 PM

 

From Wikipedia

Barrier release agents prevent adhesion by the development of a physical film or barrier between the forming surface and the concrete.

Reactive release agents are chemically active and work by the process of a chemical reaction between the release agent and the free limes available in fresh concrete. A soapy film is created which prevents adhesion. Because it is a chemically reactive process, there is generally little to no residue or unreacted product left on the forming surface or concrete which provides for a cleaner process.

Water-based release agents are a result of more focus on health, environment and safety issues. This has resulted in development of new technologies largely focused on water-based formulations, with the movement being away from petroleum- or solvent-based products.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 1 copy.jpg


How Safe (and Legal) is Your Form Release Agent?, Excerpt from Precast Inc. article

By Bob Waterloo

Become familiar with the safety standards and regulations to help protect your workers, plant and environment.

My grandfather used to show me a trick: He would strike a match and throw it into a pail of gasoline. (I do not suggest that anyone attempt this “trick.”) Because the oxygen supply was so quickly diminished, nothing happened except for the match going out. Does that mean gasoline is “safe”? Not by a long shot.

We can also make some comparisons with concrete release agents. Safety rules, both from an employee and environmental perspective, must be observed carefully to ensure we are not dealing with materials that are harmful, or potentially harmful, to our employees and environment.

Environmental safety
The vast majority of concrete form release agents use a petroleum solvent as the carrying agent. In reactive form release agents, the amount of reactive material added is relatively small – usually less than 10%. While the reactive portion is usually biodegradable (“environmentally friendly” or “readily biodegradable”), the carrying agents are normally less so.

The first assumption is to question why the material is being introduced to the environment instead of being applied to the concrete forms. Over-application of form release agents is very common in the precast industry and eventually some of this overspray ends up on the floor, ultimately washes off and contaminates the outside ground. Water run-off analyses will determine if you are contaminating the environment and perhaps ground and sub-surface water. While over-application is a waste of money and encourages bug holes and staining, we need to also educate our workers that “thinner is better” to help avoid ground contamination, reduce our costs (no matter how little) and have better-looking castings.

A second area of concern regarding the environment is Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in form release agents. Federal Regulations for allowable levels of VOCs have been in effect since September 1999. Since then, individual states have enacted legislation reducing the allowable levels of VOCs from the federal level of 450 g/L to a maximum of 250 g/L.

As local, state and provincial regulations are sometimes more stringent than federal regulations, you should check with your local authorities as to what requirements are in place for your area.

Potable (drinking) water
If you are producing castings that will be exposed to potable (drinking) water, a form release should meet the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 61 requirements. The intent is to establish standards and certify that the end product exposures are acceptable for human consumption. Very few release agents are ANSI 61 approved due to stringent tests that are conducted on the product. The tests include plant and quality certification, along with tests on the form release. It is not an inexpensive procedure, and recertification is handled on an annual basis.

Bob Waterloo is technical sales manager, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Indianapolis. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com or visit the Hill and Griffith website at www.grifcote.com. 

Concrete Form Release


Biodegradable, NSF Release Agents Offer A Range Of Options For Concrete Applications

National Sanitation Foundation (NSF/ANSI 61) certified companies now have more options for the type of concrete release agents they use during their construction projects. The Hill and Griffith Company offers the concrete industry readily biodegradable release agents that are VOC- compliant and NSF-certified. Multiple reactive technologies create a metallic soap that reduces bonding/adhesion, while promoting quick, clean stripping at the same time deterring build-up on forms and pallets.

Hill and Griffith produces concrete form release agents that are classified as either “Readily Biodegradable” or “Inherently Biodegradable,” based on OECD 301-B. Since the release agents are readily or inherently biodegradable, the environmental impact is lessened. (Precasters should check local regulations for specifics pertaining to their operation). Contractors have noticed cleaner releases, better-looking castings as well as minimized employee safety concerns. GRIFCOTE® products are widely used on precast, prestressed and poured-in-place applications among others.
The Hill and Griffith Company, headquartered in Cincinnati, has created an entire family of specialized concrete form release agents and form seasoning agents with the knowledge of what customers need and an eye on the future. For nearly 115 years, The Hill and Griffith Company has been a trusted provider of raw materials and technical expertise to the metal casting, concrete and hydraulic fluids industries.

In 1896 when John Hill founded the Hill and Griffith Company, the concept of quality was adopted. He stated, “Hill and Griffith feels that the integrity of the company must be represented in the products and services bearing our names and labels.” Today, this tradition lives on. 

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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, concrete form release

Precast Concrete Form Maintenance

Posted by Roger Roatch on Dec 1, 2017 2:29:16 PM

Properly maintaining your precast concrete forms will make them last.

Question: How can I make sure I’m getting the most longevity and use from my concrete forms?

Answer: We asked Roger Roatch with APA - the Engineered Wood Association, to respond:

When it comes to concrete structures, formwork may represent close to half the cost. Fortunately, concrete forms are durable workhorses that can be used over and over with proper maintenance and upkeep. Here are seven ways to extend the life and usefulness of your plywood concrete forms:

1. Strip forms carefully. Metal bars or pry bars should not be used on plywood because they will damage the panel surface and edge. Instead, use wood wedges, tapping gradually when necessary.

Precast Concrete From Oil Application 1.jpg

2. Clean and apply release agents. Soon after removal, plywood forms should be inspected for wear, cleaned, and repaired, spot-primed, refinished, and lightly treated with a form-release agent before reusing. Use a hardwood wedge and a stiff fiber brush for cleaning. Avoid using a metal brush because it may cause wood fibers to “wool.”

3. Apply sealants and release agents as directed. Protective sealant coatings and release agents for plywood increase form life and aid in stripping. Some panels may require only a light coating between uses. Applying a form release agent a few days before the plywood is used, then wiped so a thin film remains, will prolong the plywood’s life, increase release characteristics, and minimize staining. 

A chemically reactive release agent will give overlaid panels the longest life and should be applied before the first pour. Check with the manufacturer of the forming plywood for more details.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 2 copy.jpg

4. Know the difference between release agents and coatings. Release agents and coatings can affect forms and concrete differently, so select a release agent keeping mind its influence on the finished concrete surface. For example, some release agents including waxes or silicones should not be used where the concrete is to be painted.

Plywood form coatings, such as lacquers, resin, or plastic base compounds sometimes are used to form a hard, dry, water-resistant film on plywood forms. Usually, the field-applied coatings reduce the need for application of release agents between pours and result in greater reuse.

5. Patch and repair forms. On prefabricated forms, plywood panel faces (when the grade is suitable) may be reversed if damaged. Tie holes may be patched with metal plates, plugs, or plastic materials. Nails should be removed and holes filled with patching plaster, plastic wood, or other materials.

Proper Application of Precast Concrete Form Release Agents.jpg

6. Handle and store forms properly. Be carful to prevent panel chipping, denting, and corner damage during handling. Panels should never be dropped. Forms should be carefully piled flat, face to face and back to back. Forms should be cleaned immediately after stripping and can be solid-stacked or stacked in small packages with faces together.

Hairline cracks or splits may occur in the face ply. These “checks” may be more pronounced after repeated use of the form. Checks do not mean the plywood is delaminating. Form maintenance, including careful storage to assure slow drying, will minimize face checking.

7. Consider the effects of admixtures and chemicals. Many admixtures and pozzolans increase the abrasiveness or alkalinity of the concrete. While wood and phenolic overlays resist alkaline solutions and abrasion, some admixtures may significantly decrease the lifespan of a concrete-forming panel.

There’s much to consider when it comes to proper upkeep and maintenance of concrete forms. But following these tips will ensure the best life and use of forms project after project.

Roger Roatch is an Engineered Wood Specialist for APA. For more on concrete form maintenance and selecting the best form panel for the project, download the APA Concrete Forming Design/Construction Guide here.


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, release application video, Precast Concrete Plant Video, Application of Form Oil

Precast Concrete Plant - Application of Form Oil Video

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 26, 2017 1:45:29 PM

NPCA Precast Concrete Plant Video Virtual Tour of US Concrete, a state of the art precast manufacturing facility acquired by Oldcastle Precast in August 2012

Application-of-Form-Oil-1.jpg

There's no job too big, too unique, or too challenging for US Concrete Precast Groups, San Diego facility. The plant is one of seven in US Concrete's Precast division, which serves the West, Southwest, and Midatlantic regions. Located in sunny southern California, it is the newest and largest facility in the family. Constructed in 2007, after years of planning, it is state of the art and designed with employee input, future growth, and the environment in mind. With 49 production workers and another 17 office employees, the plant manufactures a wide variety of products for a diverse range of customers. Standard products include site furnishings and a number of underground utility and waste water solutions. With a dedicated staff and a modern facility, custom projects are a regular part of the mix as well. 

Hello, my name is Todd Everett. I'm the general manager for US Concrete Precast Group Southern California, sunny San Diego. Our San Diego plant has been a member of the MPCA since 1981, so 31 years. To get to where we are today, we were in another location in Santee, California for over 30 years, and we got to the point through growth that we were beginning to be landlocked, could not grow anymore in the area we were in, and in 2005, we approached the board of US Concrete about expansion. We were given approval to do that so the search was on. Located the property we're on now in, I think it was late 2006. Got all the permitting done and started, broke ground in 2007, early February, and opened the plant in November of 2007.

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Even more important than the facility are the people. The employees are part of a team, a point that is taken very seriously.

It's my belief that the keys to a successful precast operation, first they start with your people. We've been very blessed at this location, this plant, with the group of people we have assembled here. We consider ourself a team, therefor, we have team members.

Application-of-Form-Oil-3.jpg

As with most precast plants, a typical day begins bright and early at 6 am for production employees.

The production crew usually starts about 6 am in the morning. They get in and there's a lot of untarping, stripping, unbolting. There's usually a flow that's been predetermined already by weeks of planning ahead already before all the molds are out there. It's a system.

Application-of-Form-Oil-4.jpg

In the center of the plant, smaller products, such as drain boxes, catch basins, and meter boxes are stripped and laid on dunnage awaiting transport to either a delivery vehicle or the yard.

On the eastern end of the plant, utility vaults as large as 40 tons are stripped and flipped.

Once all products are stripped, workers immediately begin prepping the forms, including cleaning, caulking, and the application of form oil.

Application-of-Form-Oil-5.jpg

Meanwhile, on the western end of the plant, the weld shop is busy preparing cages for the empty forms. Large vault cages are assembled upside down on a raised platform by a welder, using pre-bent rebar. A cage for a large vault can take several hours.

Over by the state of the art batch plant, the morning begins with daily preparations in anticipation of the first batch, which usually occurs around 9 am. Once details are entered into the computer, the automated batch plant comes to life.

Outside, bins release the specified amount of fine and coarse aggregate, taking into account moisture content. The aggregate falls to a conveyor belt, which transfers it into one of two hoppers. One serves a one-yard mixer, the other a two-yard mixer.

Application-of-Form-Oil-6.jpg

One in the intended hopper, the aggregate is lifted up an elevator and released into the mixer.

Meanwhile, specified amounts of cement and fly ash are pumped into the mixer. After allowing the dry ingredients to mix, the batch plant releases water, add mixtures, and if needed, color and fiber.

Inside the plant, workers place a bucket under one of two chutes. Once full, the bucket is moved by forklift to one of the many overhead cranes and taken to the needed part of the plant.

Application-of-Form-Oil-7.jpg

In this instance, a yellow tinted batch is taken to the southwest corner of the plant where it's placed into forms for sidewalk pavers.
Once the batch arrives, the forms are filled, and a quality control inspection takes place.

In addition to standard products, the plant has found a niche in the custom market.

Application-of-Form-Oil-8.jpg

The team that we have assembled over the years at US Concrete, at this facility, San Diego Precast, is a team of individuals who have a great deal of knowledge. This is definitely one of those companies where there are some senior people here that have a lot of knowledge in concrete. The way we work through a custom project that's unique to us, is we get the team together. We get those that are going to be involved. We get our draftsmen, our salesmen, project managers, plant managers, quality control. We get a group of people together and then what we do is we go over the project. The goal is to make sure that it's successful, so we need to make sure that we're all on the same page. It's not a choice of will we fail. It's a choice of here's what's been put in front of us, now how do we make that succeed. That's what makes this company so special.

One recent example of the plant's custom work, is a stress ribbon bridge the company produced in 2009.

Application-of-Form-Oil-9.jpg

The stress ribbon bridge at Lake Hodges, it's actually the world's longest stress-ribbon bridge. It consists of three spans totaling 990 foot. It was also an endangered species area where they had a lot of nesting grounds for birds and things like that. The project had to be non-intrusive to the local surroundings. At the same time, the construction had to be mindful of that, schedule-wise. The finished product was quite a surprise, I think, overall to the designer that it came out so well.

Another extremely important facet of production is the quality control process. The plant has been MPCA certified since 1988, the first year certification was offered, and was among the first group of plants to reach the 20-year Continuous Certification mark in 2008.

Quality is important because we have control of every aspect from start to finish. We can control every environment on site and they can't do that. We have the ability to produce extremely precise products. The plant was designed at our old facility and we were able to incorporate everything that we wanted into the lab. A lot of the stuff we built in is stuff that we know that we're going to use 20 years from now.

Application-of-Form-Oil-10.jpg

The plant was also designed with many environmentally friendly details.

We're very mindful of the environment. The solar panels, over 60% of our energy comes from the sun. Skylights, so we're using natural light, we're using motion sensors throughout the plant, as well as the offices. Our environmentally friendly technology in our concrete, with our fly ash and other supplemental materials. We're contemporary, cutting edge if you will, precast plant.

US Concrete Precast Groups, San Diego facility, continues to find a steady flow of orders for waste water and underground utility products, as well as its custom projects. Looking to the future, it hopes to continue the growth it's had since it was founded and adapt to the ever-changing needs of its customers.

I think through our industry, through the National Precast Concrete Association, we continue to keep pushing the envelope and challenging ourself and challenge each other to continue to advance.


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Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, release application video, Precast Concrete Plant Video, Application of Form Oil

"How-It's-Made" Precast Concrete Walls with release application video

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 17, 2017 12:19:38 PM

Precast concrete walls are made in a controlled plant environment where weather can't interfere with the curing process. They're cast with insulation before they arrive at the construction site. All that's needed is a crane to do the heavy lifting.

release-agent-video-1.jpg

Precast concrete walls have a tough exterior that holds up to all kinds of weather, but making these structural walls panels is an inside job. By manufacturing them indoors, they can better prepare them for the outdoors.

release-agent-video-2.jpg

Production starts with a mix of crushed rock and sand. This mix is limestone based. The mineral mix can be altered for different strengths and finishes. A conveyor delivers the minerals to a huge mixer. They inject cement, water and additives to improve the flow of the concrete, accelerate the cure and give it a brownish hue. Beaters whip the ingredients into a thick gritty mix.

release-agent-video-3.jpg

They cast some of the concrete into cylindrical shapes for testing. After a one day cure, they crush the cylinders with a ram. The amount of force it takes to crush the cylinders is a measure of the concrete batch's strength.


(Release application video)

Before they cast the wall, a crew arranges giant foam letters to make an imprint in the mold. They position the letters in the center of the casting form and secure them with silicone. A release agent is sprayed onto the casting form and letters.

release-agent-video-4.jpg

High strength steel cables are strung throughout the form. With a hydraulic device, they pull each cable to a specific tension.

release-agent-video-5.jpg


Then, they bend a rebar rod into a loop. The rebar loops are linked, creating long cages. They place one cage at the top of the form and one at the bottom. Then, a team inserts a sheet of welded wire mesh. It's been cut to fit the size of the form.

release-agent-video-6.jpg

They're now ready to pour concrete. A truck dispenses the concrete directly into the form. The concrete flows around the steel reinforcement. The steel will keep the wall strong when the concrete expands and contracts as the weather changes. The team spreads the concrete and levels it with a tool called a 'Screed'.

release-agent-video-7.jpg

This first layer of the wall panel is essentially one side of a sandwich. It will be the exterior part of the wall. At the center of the sandwich is this rigid foam insulation. It's studded with protrusions to secure it to the concrete. More steel reinforced concrete completes the wall sandwich. This final layer will face the inside of the building, so the crew takes extra care to ensure that there are no pits or crevices.

release-agent-video-8.jpg

After about 12 hours, the wall is solid enough to be handled. They take it outdoors where a worker sandblasts a small section of the exterior side. This removes the surface cement to expose the aggregate, creating a decorative band next to the embossed lettering.

release-agent-video-9.jpg

After a three day cure, the precast concrete wall is ready for the construction site. A crew guides it onto footings. They align its design to the one on the next wall. When the two walls match up perfectly, they bolt it down. The concrete continues to cure over time, so these precast walls will stand strong for many years.

release-agent-video-11.jpg


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• Kaikōura highlighted potential deadly problems with precast concrete floors


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, release application video

Cast-O-Magic® Consolver Concrete Remover and Dissolver

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 10, 2017 9:03:29 AM

Consolver Concrete Dissolver and Remover

Consolver Concrete Remover is a biodegradable, environmentally friendly concrete remover for the toughest concrete removal jobs. It is specially formulated for the ready-mix, precast, pipe, and block industries. The cherry-scented, sugar-based product is safe for equipment, vehicles, tools, and workers, yet fast acting on concrete and lime.

Concrete form release products and concrete casting supplies from Cast-O-Magic are now available through Hill and Griffith

The Hill and Griffith Company recently acquired the Cast-O-Magic Concrete Form Release Agent product lines from Rostine Manufacturing & Supply, Inc., of Springfield, Mo. The purchase contributes to Hill and Griffith's market share growth and strongly fits within our core product range. Please contact our sales service department at 513-921-1075 or orders@hillandgriffith.com for more information.

Cast-O-Magic® Consolver Sugar-Derived Concrete Cleaner

The most Biodegradable and Environmentally-Friendly Concrete Remover

  • Sugar-based Concrete Remover
  • Safe for Equipment and Fleet Vehicles
  • Will not Etch Glass
  • Safe for Metal
  • Better Employee Safety
  • Cherry-Scented
  • Non-Irritating
  • Fast-Acting on Concrete and Lime
  • Deswcales and Cleans

 

APPLICATION

Methods:

  • Apply Consolver to vehicle, equipment, or tools undiluted
  • Apply by spraying area to be cleaned starting at  the bottom and working upwards.
  • Allow cleaner to penetrate and dissolve concrete for five minutes.
  • Reapply for heavy concrete.
  • Rinse clean with fresh, high-pressure water from a power washer.
  • Safe for use on glass, painted surfaces, aluminum, chrome, or steel.

Consolver Concrete Dissolver Sizes

 

AVAILABILITY AND COST

Availability:

Consolver Concrete Remover is available in 55, 5, and 1 gallon containers. It is also available in disposable or recyclable 275 gallon Magic-Pak.

Cost:

Material costs can be obtained by contacting The Hill and Griffith Company through our contact form.


TECHNICAL SERVICES

Technical Services can also be obtained by contacting The Hill and Griffith Company through our contact form.

 

Contact us for product information or request bulletins and technical papers.



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Precast Concrete Construction Market by Product Types, Application ...

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Technical Support, Concrete Remover

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