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Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Water Based Concrete Form Release

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 17, 2017 2:15:01 PM

Grifcote® water based concrete form release agent product lines, are non-petroleum, readily and inherently biodegradable.

Readily biodegradable concrete form release agents that are VOC-compliant and NSF-certified. Grifcote concrete casting products include the most widely used concrete form release agents in the United States, Canada and in Puerto Rico, and are commonly used on precast, prestressed and poured-in-place applications among others.

 

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Grifcote FR-50-VOC is the workhorse for the concrete industry.

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Grifcote PR-SS-VOC is specifically designed for Packerhead pipe operations and those really tough release jobs. Give us your toughest release challenge and we’ll recommend an economical solution.

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Grifcote CC-150-VOC is widely used to season forms for optimal concrete release. Spraying form release agents on mixers and equipment reduces labor and cleanup at the end of the day eliminating concrete adhering to the equipment.

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Grifcote LV-50 Plus was created specifically for use with castings that would be exposed to potable water. The material is NSF (ANSI 61) approved for use with potable water and some restrictions do apply in specific applications.

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Grifcote Bio Gold is a non-petroleum, non-staining concrete form release that is both VOC compliant and biodegradable.

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Grifcote CON 1.1 VOC is a concrete form release specifically designed for the construction/poured in place industry. It is a proprietary blend of organic materials that promotes clean and easy separation from all types of forms while deterring build-up and sticking.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Water Based Concrete Form Release

Precast Concrete Panel Construction Best Practices Video - Illustrating release agent application

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 10, 2017 4:01:27 PM

Best practices in precast concrete construction is illustrated in this video from Wilco Precast, Papkura, Auckland.

The Concrete Construction Association of New Zealand has produced a short introductory video on precast panel production. Filmed on-site, the video examines how quality precast concrete panels are manufactured for the domestic market. Appropriate concrete construction techniques including precast concrete panel release agent application, as well as health and safety practices, are covered in the short introductory video.

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A transscription of the video, "My name's Alistair Russell. I'm from the Cement and Concrete Association in New Zealand, and we're here at Wilco Precast in Papakura in Auckland. Today we're gonna be seeing best practice of concrete production within a precast factory. We're gonna be seeing concrete being delivered, placed, and manufactured into precast panels. This is a demonstration of best practice of concrete in the New Zealand concrete industry.

The first thing that happens in the construction site is the delivery comes in. We've got the reinforcing being delivered off a truck. It needs to be deposited in the correct location. When the longitudinal reinforcement is first laid out, and usually a panel is longer than the bars themselves, those bars need to be spliced together. If the shop drawings show that the splice needs to be a meter and a half, then that splice needs to be a meter and a half. The splice needs to be tied together tightly. It needs to be a contact splice. The two long bars need to be in contact together as shown in the video and then tied to the transverse bars going in the orthogonal direction.

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Once the reinforcement's laid out on the ground, the transverse reinforcement and the longitudinal reinforcement in the other direction needs to be assembled together. The way that's done is it's tied together with these thin wire ties. This can be done manually with a pair of wire clippers as you can see here, or it can be done with an automatic machine, which puts a tie in place and automatically ties the knot at the end.
The grade of the reinforcement is often written down on the reinforcement bar itself. This is SEISMIC 500E. If it's E, it also means "SEISMIC." There's also a generic bar marking shown on here. You've got a gap and then next to it, you've got the two lines. This designates this bar as being a grade 500 bar. In addition to this, reinforcement often shows the type of manufacture that was used in making the bar. This MA, which means it's a microalloyed bar. Grade 500 reinforcement, you really need to know the type of manufacture that was used because this affects what you do with reinforcement, if you can weld it, or the way you handle it, as well. In addition to this, it should be shown on the docket when it's delivered what the type of reinforcement is, but if that gets lost or you don't know where the docket is, this is what you're looking for, which tells you how you can handle the reinforcement on the site.

They consider this bar here as a grade 500 bar, even if we can't read what it is. We know that it's got that marking. I've got this handy bendometer, which tells me how tight I can bend the radius of this bar. I put the inside part of the bendometer on the bar. I know it's a 16 millimeter bar and then the outside of the bendometer is how tight I can bend the inside of the bend radius. It also says it's a 16 millimeter bar but the bendometer allows me to see what the diameter of the bar is, and therefore what the allowable bend radius is. If the bend is tighter than this, then we actually get buildup of strains on the inside and you can get a fracture or a bar rupture at that point there. It's very important to observe the bar radius and then minimum bend.

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Whilst this is also grade 500 reinforcement, we can see by the marking and it says "grade 500" here, this is a very tight radius. This is tighter that what we're allowed to have. Using the bendometer it's a 16 millimeter bar, 16 millimeter. But the bend of the radius at the end of this bar is much tighter than that. The only place that you're allowed to have such a tight bend is at the end of the bar when it forms a stirrup. This is a stirrup at the end of the bar. At other parts of the bar, you need to obey the limitations of the bendometer. Now, normally, reinforcement comes onto the site pre-bent from the manufacturer, from the supplier. But it's your responsibility when you receive the reinforcement onsite to make sure that it complies with the minimum bend radius as shown on the bendometer. In this case we can see it's too tight, but because it's a stirrup at the end of the bar it's okay to have such a tight bend.

Normally, long bars are made of grade 500 reinforcement, and that says on it "grade 500" with the appropriate markings. In this case, you've got grade 300E, so this identifies this as a grade 300 bar. Grade 300's usually used for the stirrups, and it doesn't have quite the same requirements for the bending and the handling that grade 500 reinforcement does.

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When the formwork is constructed, it's very important that it's well-supported from the outside. In this case, we've got a nice, clean timber surface on the inside. You can see the nice, clean timber surface here. Even though this is only gonna be about a 200 millimeter deep panel, not a very deep panel, the pressure, even from 200 millimeters, is enough to bow out the timber, bow out the formworks. It's very important that it's effectively supported from behind.

Prior to placing the concrete, formwork has a concrete release agent applied to it. This functions as a release between the formwork and the concrete. When it comes time to remove formwork from the concrete, we will take the panels out of the molds, which is usually in the next day or so. The two can separated without sticking.

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Once the formwork's been assembled and covered with the release agent, the reinforcement cage is placed. It's deposited with the chairs pre-attached to the reinforcement cage to make sure the reinforcements are the right depth, providing the correct cover to the reinforcement. These are the chairs that we've been talking about. This holds the reinforcement in place. It holds it at the right depth away from the edge. This is what assures the concrete has the correct cover.

Once the cage is put in place, the final detailing is done. The final tying is done to make sure that the cage stays in the right place. Then the concrete can be placed afterwards. Concrete for precast work is delivered in generally the same way as any other concrete site in a Ready Mix concrete truck. When the truck arrives at the site, in this case it's inside the precast plant, it needs to do a final mix to eliminate any small amount of segregation.

It's a good idea to put down a small piece of board to break up the initial fall of the concrete, and also to stop any impact onto the reinforcement cage. Generally, you should start pouring the concrete into the furthest point away from the truck or the chute, and then move progressively backwards. This means starting in the far corners and filling up the mold from that area back towards the truck.

Once the concrete's been poured into the molds and spread around to fill up all the spaces, it needs to be compacted. Usually, this is done with an immersion vibrator and it's important that this reaches to all the concrete and that no points are left unvibrated. The compaction should be done systematically, moving throughout the freshly laid concrete in an organized sequence and not randomly. Each area of concrete should be vibrated around about the same amount. The vibration device shouldn't be left in any place for too long.

Once the vibration of the compaction has taken place, the initial spreading should happen immediately. This spreads the concrete out and is the first pass at leveling the concrete surface. After spreading has achieved a level surface, floating is the next process. This can be done by hand or using a bull float.

Throughout the placement of concrete, there must be someone on hand to observe and record the quality of the placement and to tick off all the necessary steps in the process. Once the concrete's firm enough to walk on, you can use a machine-operated power float to work the top layer of the concrete to achieve a hard surface.

In a precast yard, the panels are usually lifted within about 24 hours after they've been cast. This panel would have been cast yesterday. You have the cast in the lifting lugs or lifting eyes, which is what the crane attaches to, and then this panel will be lifted up, removed, taken to the back of the yard, and then stored until it's delivered to the construction site.

Once the formwork's been stripped from the panels, they've been lifted, transported, and brought out into the back of this yard, in this case they're sitting here ready for delivery to the construction site to be picked up by a truck and taken out to that particular construction site.
CCANZ would like to thank Wilco Precast for their kind permission in letting us use their facility to show this practice in concrete construction."

 

About Concrete Construction Association of New Zealand

Vision: To be the leading organisation developing and defending the market for concrete, and positioning concrete as the sustainable material of choice for the built environment.

Mission: Develop and defend the market for concrete by:

  • Delivering successful industry solutions based on technical expertise.

  • Providing effective representation to Government, regulators and other stakeholders.

  • Co-ordinating education, training and research initiatives in concrete related areas.  

Values

  • Integrity: Integrity grows over time and earns CCANZ the trust of its Members and stakeholders.  Integrity builds credibility.  CCANZ acts expediently and professionally, and believes in honesty and treating others with respect.
  • Inspiration: CCANZ is passionate about concrete, and has the expertise and enthusiasm to inspire the wider and more innovative use of concrete in the built environment.
  • Team: CCANZ recognizes that cooperation with stakeholders is vital in the promotion of all things concrete.

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application

Precast Concrete Advancements - Pavement - Technology

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Aug 3, 2017 5:11:04 PM

Bill Palmer, the editor of CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION Magazine, shares precast concrete advancements from his presentation in Brazil, "What's new in North America."

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Precast Concrete Pavement

  • Competitive with slipformed concrete paving for repairs and now new construction
  • Higher quality
  • Faster construction
  • Easy repairs

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Technology

Building Information Modeling (BIM)

  • Starts with 3D model but adds metadata
  • Great for use in estimating, clash detection
  • Layout points can be loaded to robotic total station making on-site layout simple
  • Creates accurate as-built model for owner

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Telematics

  • Provides data on trucks, equipment, and operators
  • Optimization of routes for drivers
  • Utilization data on equipment allows better decisions
  • Complete data on concrete batches
  • Adapted to tracking hand and power tools

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Robotics

  • Difficult to adapt to construction projects
  • Exoskeletons
  • SAM—robotic bricklayer

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Prefabrication/Hybrid Construction

  • Using more precast parts in cast-in-place
  • Concrete cores with steel frames
  • Concrete cores with wood frames
Ground-Penetrating Radar
  • Ability to see through concrete
  • Confirm location and size of rebar and embeds
  • Locate embedded items prior to repair or remodeling projects

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3D Printing Construction

  • Additive technology
  • Approaching reality for specific types of construction—especially precast
  • Small buildings can be built

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(Thanks to Bill Palmer for keeping us up to date. We appreciated the chance to help him prepare for his presentation. In exchange, he sent us a copy. Get the full presenation.)

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Bill Palmer is editorial director of Hanley Wood’s Commercial Construction Group, which includes digital and print versions of Concrete Construction, Concrete Surfaces, The Concrete Producer, Public Works, and Masonry Construction. Previously, he worked for the American Concrete Institute for 10 years as engineering editor and director of educational programs and was the executive director of the American Society of Concrete Contractors (ASCC) and of The Masonry Society. He has been the editor in chief of Concrete Construction for 16 years. Bill is a Fellow of the American Concrete Institute and is a licensed professional engineer in Michigan and Colorado. He lives in Lyons, Colorado and can be reached at wpalmer@hanleywood.com. Follow on twitter @WmPalmer.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, Precast Concrete Advancements

Form Oil and Rebar - More on the controversy

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jul 27, 2017 3:08:52 PM

This July 10, 2017, article in PRECAST, INC. "Bond, Reinforcement Bond" concludes with more on the chemistry and physics of form oil and rebar (reinforcing bar) preparation.

"FORM OIL

Like rust, the question of how much detrimental effect form oil has on reinforcing bars is now the subject of research. The current code provisions within ACI 301, "Specifications for Structural Concrete;' section 2.3.1.15, state, "Do not allow formwork release agent to contact reinforcement;' The NPCA Quality Control Manual for Precast Concrete Plants, section 4.3.2, also states, "Reinforcement and other items to be embedded in concrete shall be free of form release agent."

However, recent research (5) casts doubt on this intuitive school of thought and current code language. Until additional data verifies results, form oil should be removed from reinforcing elements, particularly on epoxy-coated and smooth FRP bars.

(5) Belarbi, A, Richardson, NO., Swenty, MK and Taber, L.H, (2010), Effect of Combination on Reinforcing Bar-Concrete Bond, Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities, ASCE, Vol. 24, No. 3, May -June "

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This June 01, 1998 article in CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION references another report that found no significant difference in nine different rebar surface conditions tested in three different ways.

"HOW CLEAN MUST REBAR BE?

Most specifications require reinforcement to be free of deleterious materials. But do common construction contaminants have a harmful effect on bond?

Form-release agents, bond breakers and cement splatter sometimes contaminate reinforcing steel before concrete is placed. However ACI 301-96, "Standard Specifications for Structural Concrete," says: "When concrete is placed, all reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to bond." Inspectors often cite this sentence when requiring contractors to remove form-release or bond-breaker overspray and cement splatter from contaminated rebar. But is this work really necessary?

The Aberdeen Group ran a series of bond pull-out tests to assess the effect of contaminants on bond strength. Pull-out tests measure the bond force acting parallel to the bar on the interface between the bar and concrete. Clean, black Grade-60 steel bars and bars with form-release agents, curing compound/bond breakers, cement splatter, motor oil and rust on their surfaces were tested. The form release and curing compound/bond breaker were sprayed on 100% of the rebar surface to duplicate the worst case of contaminant coverage possible during construction. The used motor oil was applied to the entire bar length with a rag, and a cement paste was mixed and applied to various areas of the rebar. To produce rusted rebar, bars were dipped in hydrochloric acid then stored in a moist curing room. The results, based on 27 tests of bars with nine different surface conditions, show that the contaminants didn't adversely affect bond."

What's your opinion? Please add a comment. Thanks.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application

Precast box culvert concrete release agent application

Posted by Alli Myers on Jul 20, 2017 11:47:46 AM

"Release agent is then applied to the form in a thin layer. This helps the concrete release from the metal during product stripping."

From the their YouTube page, "A short video showing how Barger And Sons manufactures our precast concrete box culvert. Barger And Sons disciplined operations yield the same high quality results time after time after time. All Barger Box Culvert is manufactured to meet ASTM C 1433 and 1577 applications. Cooper E80 design specification for rail road applications are also manufacutered. Barger box culvert is offered in a number of different styles because one size does not fit all jobsite requirements. Monolithic, three sided, and crown and base can all be manufactured by Barger And Sons. Published on Aug. 31, 2010."

 

 

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From their web site, "Welcome to Barger Precast! If this is your first visit to our site, you will find page after page of information designed to enhance your understanding so that you, whether buying, specifying or installing, can make an educated decision about our precast concrete products.

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If you don’t find the information that you need, don’t hesitate to give us a call toll free at 888-882-5860. You will find our folks to be friendly, helpful, and eager to assist you in your search for information or in taking your order.

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You will also find that no other supplier lives up to the commitment to deliver exactly what you need – where you need it – when you need it. These are just a few of the reasons we like to say that Barger and Sons is number one in more than the number two business.

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We have been serving homeowners, contractors, developers, engineers and utilities for more than 50 years, providing the best value solutions for every water, sewer, drainage, piping and many other projects.

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During our years of service to East Tennessee, we have discovered that an informed buyer will always select the solution that best meets his/her needs. That’s why our approach is somewhat unique – we focus on informing potential customers of the technical and operational features that are important to their application. Then, we show how our products and services deliver those features and offer the best value to the buyer."

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The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release agent characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application

Do I need to remove concrete form oil from rebar?

Posted by Alli Myers on Jul 12, 2017 10:11:03 AM

No. A common misunderstanding in the concrete industry is clarified in this review of an article from ForConstructionPros.com.

Question: On several of our most recent projects, the inspector has been complicating our pour schedule when finding form oil over-sprayed on the rebar. Is it our misunderstanding that form oil on rebar shouldn’t pose a problem to the performance or the acceptance of our pre-pour inspection?

Answer: Your question addresses a common problem across the construction industry. Code edition after code edition presents challenges throughout the industry to remain current with the latest acceptable practices. This is a question of appropriate code reference — ACI 332 — rather than ACI 318, and of referencing the most recent version, ACI 332-10, instead of older versions -04 or -08.

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Stated in section 4.2.4 of ACI 332-10, the code provides:

"4.2.4 Surface conditions of reinforcement—At the time concrete is placed, deformed bar and welded wire reinforcement shall be free of materials deleterious to development of bond strength between the reinforcement and the concrete."

"R4.2.4 Common surface contaminants such as concrete splatter, rust, form oil, or other release agents have been found not to be deleterious to bond."

First, during construction, nothing should be found on the reinforcement that would adversely affect the bond strength of the reinforcement in the concrete. Second, what common site conditions found on rebar are not to be considered deleterious to bond. Form oil is a surface contaminant that is not considered deleterious to bond.

Deformed bar and welded wire are designed to achieve a mechanical bond with the concrete rather than a chemical or adhesive bond. The mechanical bond relies on a keying action with the deformations along the length of the reinforcement bar. As long as the surface contaminants do not effectively eliminate the presence of those deformations, they would not be considered deleterious to bond.

ACI 332-10 is available through the bookstore at www.concrete.org.

To read the full article about concrete form oil on rebar go to, "Oil on Rebar."


The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application, concrete form oil

Hollowcore Precast Concrete Video Showing Form Release Application

Posted by Alli Myers on Jul 6, 2017 6:17:32 PM

A hollowcore precast concrete plank is prestressed concrete used in the construction of multi-story building floors.

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The concrete hollowcore method is popular in insect prone, coastal, earthquake and severe weather areas. It offers fast building assembly and lower material weight.

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The hollowcore slab has tubular voids extending the full length of the slab. This makes it lighter than a solid concrete floor of equal thickness.

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The reduced weight lowers transportation and material costs. They are typically 4 to 5 feet wide with thicknesses between 10 and 16 inches.

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Prestressed reinforcing steel wire rope provides resistance to bending moment from loads.

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The manufacturing process involves extruding wet concrete from a moving mold over a steel bed on which the form release application has dried.

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The continuous slab is cut by circular diamond saws to the length required. Factory production provides the advantages of reduced time, labor and training.

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Hollow core voids can be used for conduit or coated for use as a ventilation duct.

(Video and stills from Alli Myers' YouTube Channel; text from Wikipedia)


The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete form seasoning, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, Form Release Application

Concrete Form Seasoning and Material Selection

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 29, 2017 10:28:35 AM

Which concrete form substrates and finishes are best for your application?

Considering what form substrate what form substrate material and what surface finish will be best for an application depends on the surface finish specified for the concrete, the number of form reuses the project requires, the strength and deflection characteristics of the substrate, price, and perhaps the thickness tolerances of a product—especially important for architectural concrete work.

Choices for form substrates and surface finishes range from inexpensive CDX plywood that serves as both the substrate and the surface finish, to more expensive aluminum, steel, or plastic resin composite materials with exotic finished surfaces for multiple reuses.The latter may be the bargain compared to plywood when considering the per placement cost versus the original purchase cost.

Which substrate and surface finish to use is driven by project requirements. If the forms will be reused 100 times, form panels should be purchased to meet the requirement. Refacing a form assembly halfway through a project causes delays and is expensive. Conversely, it isn't cost productive to invest in materials that can get 100 uses for a job that will only require 20.

Concrete-Form-Seasoning-1.jpg
(Image from Wharton Concrete Forms.)

This article was published on Nov 25, 2008 in CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION Magazine by 

Substrate materials

Plywood, steel, aluminum, and composite materials are used for both vertical and horizontal forming systems as a substrate material. Located behind these panels are an array of strong-backs, whalers, and trusses that also are made from wood, steel, or aluminum.

There are many substrate material and surface surface finish choices choices in the marketplace, each each with advantages with advantages, disadvantages, and costs. The challenge is to select the right product for the product the job.

Wood substrates.
For single-use applications, CDX plywood is probably the cheapest substrate material when the concrete finish doesn't matter. For example, the back side of a unique retaining wall section not in public view might be a good application for a single-use form. But be aware that CDX is designed for other purposes, has only 5 plys, and isn't rated for the pressures that concrete can impose. For repetitive work, better grades of plywood are necessary. They don't absorb as much moisture and help to reduce the concrete build up (laitance build) on the casting surface. These can be pre-oiled panels or substrate plywood panels with waterproof surface finishes.

Most plywood for concrete forming is 7 ply, though there is some plywood available with more laminations. Although some 5-ply sheets are available, most contractors prefer 7 ply because they are stronger and have less deflection. Sheets are manufactured by either a one-or two-step process. Manufacturing a one-step sheet involves placing the overlay material and all the veneers with waterproof and boil proof glue in a hot press. The resulting panel has thickness tolerances of ± 1/32 inch. Two-step panel processing involves gluing the veneers in a press, repairing panel faces with poly-patch compounds, sanding the surfaces smooth to a tight tolerance, and then bonding the overlay surface to the panel in a hot press. These panels have thickness tolerances of ± 0.005 to 0.006 inch with no transfer of grain lines or knot holes to the concrete, making them a good choice for high-end, architectural concrete finishes.

The first place deterioration starts on a wood panel is along the edges because water can easily enter and cause swelling. Manufacturers of overlay panels typically seal the edges with polymer products so every cut you make also should be sealed. Here are some of the wood substrate classifications available.

B-face
B-back, oiled, and edge sealed (BBOES). Plywood panel surfaces are ranked as “A,” “B,” or “C.” Surfaces marked as “B” permit 20 to 25 knot holes and exposed grain on a 4x8-foot sheet. “Oiled” refers to the panel being oiled during the manufacturing process to allow for easier release from the concrete. “Edge sealed” means the panel edges are sealed at the factory to reduce moisture absorption. BBOES is typically made from either Southern Yellow Pine (SYP) or Douglas Fir (DF). SYP panels are less expensive than DF and usually are heavier. DF panels typically are better quality than SYP because moisture doesn't cause them to swell or move as much and they are almost always the panels used for overlay surfaces. All BBOES products will exhibit grain and patch transfer to the finished concrete. You can expect four to eight uses and the application of release agents is required before each concrete placement.

Hardwood panels.
Hardwood veneers on top of DF panels offer blemish-free surfaces with less moisture absorption. The wood for these veneers includes maple, oak, Brazilian, and Indonesian hardwoods. Used as overlay panels, they are cleaner and offer better adhesion for overlay resins.

Steel substrates.
The typical substrate thickness of a steel panel is 3/16 to ¼ inch, but can be as little as 14 gauge for handset panels. With a life expectancy of several decades, or even a lifetime, deflection of these panels is minimal and create very smooth concrete surfaces. When using steel forms, designers usually are concerned more about panel joint and tie-hole locations than finish. Steel deck forms feature a steel frame, a plywood substrate, and a resin surface finish. Form manufacturers generally require thin-film, reactive-type form release compounds for good form release.

Aluminum substrates.
Like steel, the aluminum in a panel serves as both the substrate and the finished surface. Standard substrate thicknesses range from 0.094 to 0.120 inch, but they can be more for gang form wall panels where greater head pressures are anticipated. The panels are much lighter than steel, are built to have little deflection under load, and can provide very smooth concrete finishes. When they are properly cared for, you can achieve more than 2000 uses. New forms must be “seasoned” (some manufacturers preseason them) to avoid a reaction between the aluminum and the alkali of the cement that results in a disfigured surface.

Overlay finishes
Material that is factory applied to any given substrate is referred to as an overlay. Overlay panels are alkali resistant and minimize labor costs by reducing clean up time between placements. They are more resistant to moisture penetration—increasing resistance to cracking or “checking” as well—extending the life of the form. They also produce smooth concrete finishes.

There are two categories of form surfaces with a resin impregnated paper: medium-density overlays (MDO) and high-density overlays (HDO). MDOs consist of a large family of phenolic resin impregnated overlays designed for use on engineered wood substrates. Easy field use combined with the ability to produce superior matt or architectural finishes make them a favorite choice for concrete contractors.

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(Image from Wharton Concrete Forms.)

MDO panels. MDO 1 step panels incorporate a layer of Kraft brown resin impregnated paper. The concrete surfaces produced by them are smooth with some grain and patch transfer. You typically can expect eight to 12 placements. MDO 2 step panels provide a smoother finish. Surface blemishes in the base panel are repaired and sanded before the resin impregnated Kraft paper is added. The result is a smooth matt finish that can handle 12 to 15 concrete placements.

HDO panels.
HDO form surfaces are especially good for high-gloss architectural finishes. Like MDOs, they encapsulate paper in resin, but the resin content in HDOs is higher—varying from 48% to 58%. There are two types of HDO.

HDO 1 Side 1 Step. Paper and resin is placed on both sides of an engineered panel to minimize moisture penetration, thereby helping panels to stay flatter or balance the sheet. The expected usage is 20 to 35 concrete placements.

HDO 2 Side 2 Step. Substrates are first glued, patched, and sanded to close even thickness tolerances. Then 48% to 58% resin impregnated paper is bonded to both sides.

Melamine overlays.
The least expensive version is a very thin melamine layer over particle board for limited-use application. The more durable version features 2-mil build ups that add both weight and expense to a form. But the number of reuses makes it worth the cost and finishes are architectural grade.

Composite resin systems.
These create perhaps the best overlay system of all—the only ones that can be applied over a metal surface. They are made with polyethylene and polypropylene, or mixtures of plastic materials. Nail holes and dents can be easily repaired. They are more expensive to purchase but with proper care and maintenance are reusable as many as 100 times.

Composite systems.
One substrate panel is built with foamed polypropylene sandwiched between thin sheets of aluminum or fiberglass with polypropylene surface finishes. Because there is no wood in the system, cleaning can be achieved in less time by using a pressure washer and 1000 reuses are possible.

Urethanes.
Urethane creates a hard, durable finish and concrete contractors sometimes apply them over inexpensive forms. But considering the cost of the material and labor to apply, this approach is perhaps not worth it.

Form releases
All surface finish products require the use of form release products and all forms manufacturers stress the need to use minimal amounts that won't affect surfaces adversely. Excessive amounts of release agents can cause a vacuum or sticking affect on some denser surfaces. Most of the recommended products react with the alkalinity of concrete to produce soapy films that break the bond between forms and concrete.

Choosing a system
Contractors sometimes make the mistake of choosing a form panel system based on initial cost. If they know they will need to reuse their panels 80 times on a project and choose a product that will only get 60 reuses, they will have to remove the panels from their form system and replace them in order to complete the job—this adds labor, job downtime, and new panel costs. There is a cost advantage to choosing a system that will complete all the placements. Calculate the total uses for a project and buy in order to complete the entire job with one purchase.

Marcus M. Chase is senior vice president of market development and sales for MAXAM Industries Inc. He brings nearly 22 years of experience, with a special focus on wood and the concrete forming industry. He has either developed or assisted in development of new concrete forming panel technologies in high reuse, no oil, and LEED-compliant materials. Joe Nasvik is a senior editor for CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION magazine.

Forest Stewardship Council (FCS)

You may see a specification for FSC panels. This refers to how the lumber was grown, farmed, or cut from native stands. In order to produce FSC panels, the manufacturer of the forms must be certified as well as the logging enterprise and all parties in the transaction. This is referred to as the “chain of custody.” Only a handful of mills are certified at this point but you will undoubtedly see more specifications for FSC products.

Tips on how to maintain forms
Every time you cut a panel be sure to apply edge seal over the new cut.
When you stack form sheets, stack them face to face.
Don't expose form surfaces to the sun for long periods of time.
Use a good form release product and apply it sparingly before each concrete placement.
Clean form surfaces shortly after removing them after a concrete placement.
Repair nail fastener holes and dents as they occur (few contractors do this).


Grifcote CC-150-VOC is widely used for concrete form seasoning for optimal concrete release.

Spraying form release agents on mixers and equipment reduces labor and cleanup at the end of the day eliminating concrete adhering to the equipment.

The Hill and Griffith Company also works closely with pipe and form equipment manufactures to provide optimum concrete release characteristics with their equipment.

All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
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On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
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 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete form seasoning, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application

Readily & Inherently Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 22, 2017 3:11:13 PM

Hill & Griffith offers the perfect release with Grifcote concrete form release agents that are readily and inherently biodegradable.

Grifcote® products, the most widely used concrete form release agents in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico, offer many unique features to improve concrete separation from forms and molds.

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Forms and molds are not stained by Grifcote products. Gricote is ready to use with no mixing needed. All release agents are easily sprayed, swabbed or wiped. Since worker safety is vital to your operations, we’ve engineered Grifcote products to have low odor and flash points above 200 degrees Fahrenheit to keep workers safe. Grifcote carries a non-flammable/non-combustible rating.

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Grifcote Products are not considered a DOT hazardous material and are exempt from placards. Drivers DO NOT need to be Haz Mat 126 Certified to transport)

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In addition, Grifcote is chemically formulated to reduce the formation of bug holes. Reactive fatty acid/methyl esters react with cement. The metallic soap that is formed eases separation from the form and minimizes sticking. The high viscosity allows Grifcote to be easily spread over large spans. Coverage rates are determined by the person applying the material. In all cases, the “Thinner is better” rule applies for maximum coverage and best release and finish.

Other uses of Grifcote include assisting form and pallet cleanup. Spraying form release agents on mixers and equipment also speeds cleanup at the end of the day. Plus all EPA VOC and OSHA requirements are met by Grifcote products.

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With indefinite freeze/thaw cycles or teeter cycles, you don’t need to worry about Grifcote degrading due to temperature changes. So, you can purchase Grifcote products in 6,000-gallon tanks or as small as 5-gallon pails depending on your needs.

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Grifcote form release agents are designed for specific industry applications. For example, FR-50-VOC/R-VOC are used for precast, pipe, burial vault, prestressed and other similar applications.

While the PR-SS-VOC would work best for Packerhead pipe operations and those really tough release jobs.

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Other specific products were created specifically for use with potable water and for seasoning forms. The LV-50 Plus is NSF (ANSI 61) approved for use with potable water (some restrictions may apply).

And CC-150-VOC is best used to season concrete forms for the best release. 

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Our products have low VOC and are non-carcinogenic according to the ACGIH, NTP, IRAC or OSHA.

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All Grifcote products are readily biodegradable, which means they have a half-life of 28 days or fewer. And by definition, all Grifcote products are inherently biodegradable with a half-life of 60 days or fewer.

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Biodegradable Concrete Form Release, Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote FR 50 Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application

New Precast Concrete Technology at Missouri Schools & Universities

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 15, 2017 2:27:35 PM

New precast concrete technology will increase the capabilities of precast concrete to meet the critical needs of infrastructure rebuilding in the United States.

Missouri schools partner to complete construction and materials lab to assisit in the rehabilitation of urban mass-transportation centers, including highways, bridges, tunnels, rail, airports, port and water navigation channels, and utility infrastructure.

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Innovations will offer faster, longer-lasting, more cost-effective, and greener solutions to building and infrastructure challenges.

Missouri University of Science and Technology The Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory will add 16,000 square feet of research space.

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Missouri University of Science and Technology is partnering with the University of Missouri system to fully support a key research initiative at Missouri S&T, the Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory (ACML). The laboratory is expected to position Missouri S&T as a national leader in the development of innovative materials and approaches to address public infrastructure challenges.

The ACML was Missouri S&T’s top-priority capital project for matching funds from the state of Missouri through the state’s 50-50 program. Under that program, the Missouri legislature would appropriate equivalent funds to match private donations for capital projects on UM System campuses that would benefit Missouri and Missourians. No 50-50 projects received state support this year. But Missouri S&T and UM System leaders decided that the ACML project was too important to delay, so they chose to designate university funds to complete it.

“This project is very important to the needs of our state, our nation and our world for us to let it languish,” says Dr. Christopher G. Maples, interim chancellor of Missouri S&T. “It is time to take matters into our own hands to make the Advanced Construction and Materials Laboratory a reality.”

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A strategic investment

Missouri S&T has raised more than $3 million in private donations toward the $6.5 million project, including a $3 million gift from the estate of James A. Heidman, a 1965 civil engineering graduate of the university, and a $100,000 gift from the Sunderland Foundation, the charitable arm of Ash Grove Cement Co. UM System President Mun Y. Choi has agreed to commit half of the remaining funds from the system while Missouri S&T will continue fundraising efforts to cover the remaining project costs.

The ACML was identified as a strategic investment by the UM System during Choi’s budget address on Friday, June 2. Strategic investments are designed to strengthen programs of excellence for the UM System and its campuses.

“I’m very grateful to President Choi for his commitment to this important initiative, and to our donors for their support of our vision to make Missouri S&T a global leader in developing new and innovative approaches to address pressing issues with our nation’s infrastructure,” says Maples.

Dr. Robert J. Marley, provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs, was instrumental in securing support for the project, Maples adds. “Provost Marley’s work, in particular, will help our incoming vice provost and dean for the College of Engineering and Computing, Dr. Richard W. Wlezien, build on our strengths in infrastructure research to further promote research, scholarship and teaching.”

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About the ACML

The ACML will expand the High-bay Structures Laboratory in Butler-Carlton Civil Engineering Hall to provide 16,000 square feet of research space for developing and testing new construction materials and methods. These innovations will offer faster, longer-lasting, more cost-effective and greener solutions to building and infrastructure challenges.

“The addition of this premier facility will position Missouri S&T as a global leader in infrastructure research and will help us realize our long-term vision of making civil infrastructure safer, more durable and longer lasting,” says Dr. Joel Burken, Curators’ Distinguished Professor and chair of civil, architectural and environmental engineering at Missouri S&T. As an expansion of the High-bay Structures Laboratory, the ACML will combine S&T’s infrastructure testing and analysis – a specialty of the high-bay lab – with the development of new materials in the ACML. The result will be greater collaboration among researchers who specialize in developing materials and those who specialize in testing them.

Once completed, the ACML will consolidate more than 35 pieces of testing equipment currently scattered in buildings across campus and at the Hy Point Industrial Park east of Rolla.

The ACML also will support Missouri S&T’s Advanced Materials for Sustainable Infrastructure signature area. This signature area focuses on the rehabilitation of urban mass-transportation centers, including highways, bridges, tunnels, rail, airports, port and water navigation channels, and utility infrastructure. It encompasses four S&T research centers and six academic departments.

“Infrastructure is the foundation that connects the nation’s businesses, communities and people, driving our economy and improving our quality of life,” says Dr. Kamal H. Khayat, lab director and the Vernon and Maralee Jones Professor of Civil Engineering at Missouri S&T. “Missouri S&T has existing strengths in this area and with further emphasis, we can become a best-in-class leader.”

The university plans to present the project to the UM System Board of Curators for approval at the board’s September meeting. The project is expected to take two years to complete.

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(This article was published by Concrete Producer Magazine June 5, 2017.)


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Casting Products, concrete release agents, concrete casting supplies, Grifcote FR 50 Concrete Form Release, Grifcote, Precast Concrete Form Release, Concrete Form Release Application, New Precast Concrete Technology