<img alt="" src="https://secure.hims1nice.com/150891.png" style="display:none;">

Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

The Hill and Griffith Company Welcomes Executive-Level Director of Sales

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 17, 2019 2:58:41 PM

The Hill and Griffith Company is proud to announce and welcome Ryan Canfield as the company’s Director of Sales & Business Development.

Ryan Canfield 560

Ryan will be responsible for sales team leadership, driving revenue, contributing to product selection, marketing, as well as general management responsibilities.

Canfield also comes to H&G with 17+ years of experience in sales, technical support, marketing and engineering for the foundry, die cast, precast and prestress concrete industries. Ryan’s proven track record was instrumental in increasing annual company revenue, customer retention and customer satisfaction ratings in previous direct sales and management roles. He also holds an Engineering Degree from Trine University in Angola, IN.

He joins the H&G team from Carbo Ceramics located in Houston, TX.

#marketing #sales #concrete


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

 Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Ryan Canfield

Precast Concrete - Care and Seasoning of Metal Forms and Rings

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Jun 13, 2019 3:56:20 PM

Would you ever have thought that you could make money just by walking around? That’s the first step (no pun intended) of a maintenance program for your metal forms and rings.

concrete_bio_gold_form-1-1

Just by taking a look at these expensive pieces of equipment, you can tell whether or not they are getting the attention they need. If they are suffering from neglect, they can cost you later in terms of reduced longevity and deteriorated product quality. It helps to be armed with a little knowledge about concrete form release agents, rust inhibitors and rust preventatives and how they react with metal.

By Bob Waterloo, Technical Sales Manager of concrete release agents for The Hill and Griffith Company.
Forms and rings are part of our lives, and we need to maintain them in order for them to perform and provide us with profits and saleable castings.

With just a little effort, we can prepare these forms for optimum production, minimize labor required to keep them clean and functional, and just make our lives a lot easier.

First, here are some of the basic items needed for form and ring storage and maintenance:

  • Level area
  • Concrete platform or timber material on which to store them
  • Covers or tarps for moisture and dust protection (indoor covered storage is ideal but often unavailable)
  • Power washer
  • Putty knife or long-handled ice scrape
  • Brass wool, scrub pads or other minimally abrasive material for cleaning
  • Electric grinder with wire brush head (not recommended unless absolutely necessary)
  • Release agent (petroleum solvent-based) for long-term form protection

In an ideal world, all of this expensive equipment would be stored indoors in a protected, heated and dry area. Unfortunately this is not the case in the real world, so we need to take care to give our equipment the best possible care with what we have available.

 

Short-term and long-term storage
For short-term storage, a good quality VOC compliant petroleum solvent-based form release will normally serve our needs. Before the form is put into storage, apply a liberal coating of the form release. If the forms are stored outside, even for a short period of time, a quick walk-by is often necessary to be sure the form release has not washed off from the rain. If any evidence of rust is present, apply another coat of the form release on the forms and rings as quickly as possible.

For long-term storage, a good quality VOC compliant form release will do the job, but as outlined above, recoat with the form release on a regular basis. A biodegradable form release (meeting the EPA definition of biodegradability, but not a water-based material) is preferred, as over-application is desired and some of the material will end up on the ground.

The second alternative for long-term storage is a rust inhibitor. Rust inhibitors should have the capacity to displace the mechanically held water on the surface of the form. The form also needs to be protected with a plastic cover or inverted so that rain and snow do not wear the rust inhibitor away. With rust inhibitors, the form can generally be brought back into production with a minimum of labor required to remove the inhibitor. If you are using a water-based form release, it is best to apply a rust inhibitor or rust preventative as quickly as possible, as the residual water will cause rusting immediately.

The third alternative is a rust preventative. These are typically epoxy-based materials that can be compared to a layer of paint. While rust preventatives generally do a good job in protecting the forms, they are fairly labor intensive in application and should be removed before bringing the forms and rings back into production. Grinding is usually necessary to remove the rust preventative, which in turn destroys the “seasoning” of the form.

When storing equipment, it should be stored in such a fashion that it can be put back into production without having to spend time adjusting or repairing. Rings (pallets and headers) should be stored in flat racks in a stack and, if possible, on pallets.

Seasoning
Reactive form release agents, the most commonly used release agents in precast and pipe production, typically contain fatty acids. Fatty acids are mild acids composed of animal fats and vegetable oils. Of course there are a very great number of possible combinations of animal fats and vegetable oils, and not all combinations will serve as “good” reactive form release agents.

The reactive portion of the form release agent serves two initially important functions. First, fatty acids have a natural affinity for metal. This includes gray, ductile and malleable iron, brass, bronze, aluminum and mild steel. Fatty acids react with metal to form a protective barrier, which is a coating of metallic oleate. This process is known as seasoning. This protective layer prevents further application of fatty acids from migrating to the metal of the form and allows the fatty acid to remain on the surface of the form to react with the free lime on the surface of the casting.

Try using this analogy on your production workers to help them understand some of the concepts of seasoning:

A fisherman always has his “favorite” frying pan. There is no way that he would ever let that frying pan be put in water and scrubbed clean with a scouring pad. Why? Because it would remove the seasoning that is part of the pan. If he has to buy a new pan, what is the first thing he does? He gets some lard or vegetable oil (both are simple examples of fatty acids), puts it in the pan and places the pan in the oven at a high temperature for an extended period of time. Why? So the pan can become seasoned.

This same seasoning holds true for your forms and pallets. When concrete is poured into the form, the reactive portion of the form release (the fatty acid) reacts with the free lime on the surface of the concrete to form a metallic soap. This reaction is called neutralization. As fatty acids (typically a pH of 6.8) react with the free lime on the surface of the concrete (typically a pH of 11.5), they neutralize one another and create the metallic soap, a reaction known as saponification.

This soap, then, also serves two purposes. First, it enhances the easy separation of the form from the castings. Second, as it is a soap, it allows free air to rise more easily on the vertical surfaces of the castings, resulting in fewer surface defects.

Once this metallic oleate layer is created on the metal form, any grinding or surface abrasiveness, including welding to repair a form or grinding with wire brushes, will destroy the protective layer. The next time a reactive form release is applied, the fatty acid will react with the form, leaving nothing to react with the free lime. It is very important to minimize grinding on forms, and usually nothing finer than a putty knife or an ice scraper should be used to remove splatter or “stickers.” In the case of sticker, there is a reason that this occurs, and normally an application of a seasoning agent to this small area will help prevent future sticking and buildup.

Seasoning of forms is a very basic requirement to help minimize the amount of labor involved when forms are stripped or pipes are tipped out. If forms, pallets and headers are properly maintained, labor cost and better looking castings are the end result.

Forms in storage, new forms, pallets and headers
New forms, pallets and headers will frequently arrive with a protective coating on them to help prevent rusting in transit or until the forms are sold and delivered. This protective coating can be allowed to wear off, but at that point it is allowing raw metal to be exposed. While the first few pours might be satisfactory, now that raw metal is exposed, the reactive portion of the form release agent will now start to react with the raw metal, leaving nothing to react with the free lime and form the metallic soap. An alternative is to remove the protective coating with solvents or grinding and apply a seasoning agent, allowing it to set for a minimum of four hours. A 24-hour period is better, as it allows more seasoning to take place. Also, forms that are exposed to the sun will season more quickly as higher temperatures increase the reactivity with the metal forms and rings.

Forms that have been in storage and have rusted also need to be re-seasoned. Rust is nothing more than oxidized metal, and when rusting occurs, the metallic oleate barrier has been destroyed. Casting can be done without removing the rust, but again, once the raw metal is exposed, the fatty acid will react with the raw metal until the form is seasoned. The rust stain will also transfer to the casting. An alternative is to grind down the form/pallet/headers, apply a seasoning agent and allow time for the reaction to take place to allow the metallic oleate to form.

The old saying of “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” holds true to maintaining your forms, pallets and headers by getting them seasoned and keeping them seasoned. A little attention today will save a lot of grief tomorrow.

Proper treatment of this very costly equipment with the care it deserves will enable you to be more competitive in the marketplace and be a better steward of our environment.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents

Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe & Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe, Review of AWWA Standard for Potable Water

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on May 24, 2019 10:06:05 PM

"The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use."

Concrete Pressure Pipr 101

There are two types of prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe:

(1) the lined-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder lined with concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped directly on the steel cylinder and coated with mortar; and

(2) the embedded-cylinder type, with a core composed of a steel cylinder encased in concrete and subsequently wire-wrapped on the exterior concrete surface and coated with cement mortar.

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

I. Introduction

I.A. Background

 

The lined-cylinder type, which was first used in the United States in 1942, is furnished in sizes from 16 in. (410 mm) to 60 in. (1,520 mm). The embedded-cylinder type, which was developed later and first installed in 1953, is most commonly manufactured in sizes 48 in. (1,220 mm) and larger. Both types are designed for the specific combination of internal pressure and external load required for the project in accordance with the procedures outlined in ANSI/AWWA C304, Standard for Design of Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe. Prestressed concrete steel-cylinder pipe is used for transmission mains, distribution feeder mains, pressure siphons (including river crossings), penstocks, industrial pressure lines, water intake lines, and other applications. In the manufacture of lined-cylinder pipe, the first step is to fabricate and hydrostatically test the steel cylinder with joint rings attached. The cylinder is then lined with concrete to form the core. The concrete is placed either centrifugally, by vertical casting, or by a radial compaction method. The concrete lining is cured and high-tensile wire is wrapped around the core directly on the steel cylinder. For a selected wire size, the tension and spacing of the wire are controlled to produce a predetermined residual compression in the core to meet design requirements. The wrapped core is then covered with a dense premixed mortar coating applied by a mechanical impact method. In the manufacture of embedded-cylinder pipe, the cylinder and joint rings are constructed and tested in the same manner as lined-cylinder pipe. The cylinder is encased in concrete by vertical casting and mechanical vibration to constitute the core. After curing, the wire reinforcement is wound under tension in one or more layers around the outside of the concrete core containing the cylinder, instead of directly on the cylinder. The exterior coating of premixed mortar is placed by impaction. 

Concrete Pressure Pipe Basics

(Image from PUBLIC WORKS Magazine.)

4.6.5 Concrete for pipe core.

4.6.5.1 General. The concrete in the cores may be placed by the centrifugal method, by the vertical casting method, or by other approved methods.

4.6.5.10 Placing concrete by vertical casting method. The concrete lining or core shall be cast on-end on a cast-iron or steel base ring with rigid steel collapsible forms for the concrete surfaces. The forms shall be designed to ensure that they will have smooth contact surfaces, tight joints, and that they will be firmly and accurately held in proper position without distortion during the placing of the concrete. The forms shall be designed to allow the pipe core to be removed without damaging the surfaces of the concrete. The forms shall be cleaned thoroughly and coated with a form-release agent before each use.

(Remember that any concrete form release used for potable water needs to be NSF approved, like Grifcote LV-50 Plus.)

The transporting and placing of concrete shall be carried out by methods that will not cause the separation of concrete materials or the displacement of the steel cylinder or forms from their proper positions. Adequate methods of mechanical vibration shall be used to compact the concrete in the forms and to ensure satisfactory surfaces. 


Precast Concrete In The Google and NPCA News:

Precast Products - National Precast Concrete Association

Precast Concrete Pipe - National Precast Concrete Association

Precast Concrete Pipe Durability - American Concrete Pipe Association


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors, NSF potable water concrete release agents and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, NSF Potable Water Concrete Release Agents, Grifcote LV-50 Plus, Prestressed Concrete Pressure Pipe, Concrete Steel Pressure Pipe, AWWA

ACPA Education Review: "Concrete Pipe – Pre & Post Pour Inspections"

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Apr 18, 2019 3:21:42 PM

The American Concrete Pipe Association's PPT, "Pre & Post Pour Inspections" contains information on Documentation, Pre-Pour Inspection of Equipment & Reinforcement, and Post-Pour Inspection of Stripping, Handling, Visual & Dimensions 

This is an excellent presentation of all the steps involved in producing high-quality concrete pipe. 

Concrete Pipe Pre Pour Documentation
Go to this link to download the PowerPoint.

Download a PDF.


Concrete Pipe Pre Pour Form Release

Concrete Pipe Manufacturing Pre-Pour Inspection - Form Release: Application methods, brush, spray; How much is enough??, Too Little, Too Much, Affects concrete finish, may affect curing

 

Concrete Pipe Pre Pour Barrier Form Release

Concrete Pipe Manufacturing Pre-Pour Inspection - Form Release: Barrier (non-reactive); Examples, Petroleum-based diesel, heating oils, used crankcase oil;

Advantages, Creates a physical barrier between form and fresh concrete;

Disadvantages, Need heavy application for easy release (200-400 ft2/gal), Can cause staining and bugholes, May not meet VOC requirements, Can cause buildup on forms

Concrete Pipe Pre Pour Chemically Reactive Form Release

Concrete Pipe Manufacturing Pre-Pour Inspection - Form Release: Chemically Reactive; Examples, Fatty acids (vegetable and mineral oils) are chemically reactive agents that combine with calcium in fresh cement paste to produce a soap-like film between the concrete and the form;

Advantages, Prevents bonding of concrete to form, Ultra-thin Layer (Approximately 0.005”), Reduce bugholes, stains, dusting, Typically meets VOC requirements (verify)

Disadvantages, Typically more costly per gallon

Concrete Pipe Pre Pour Seasoning

Concrete Pipe Manufacturing Pre-Pour Inspection - Seasoning

1. Remove protective coating to prevent staining, sticking, poor finish

  • Wear off during production
  • Solvents
  • Grind
  • Blast

2. Apply high fatty acid concentrate release agent; Let it react (forms metallic soap barrier). If using a barrier agent, use it for seasoning.

3. Ideally allow 24-hr sit-time

4. Apply release agent

5. Put into use

Concrete Pipe Post Pour Bug Holes

The American Concrete Pipe Association was originally conceived in 1907 by a small group of concrete farm drain tile manufacturers as the Interstate Cement Tile Manufacturers Association in Ames, Iowa.

The group needed some means of exchanging ideas and establishing a high quality, standardized products. In 1914, the organization was renamed the American Concrete Pipe Association. Throughout the 20th century, the concrete pipe industry has experienced tremendous growth. As more and more people moved from farms to cities, it created increased demand for concrete sewer and drainage products. The introduction of the automobile and subsequent highway development extended the uses of concrete pipe storm drains and culverts. There are currently over 400 plants operated by ACPA members in the United States and Canada. Over 40 countries are represented in the membership of the American Concrete Pipe Association. ACPA’s international headquarters are located in Irving, Texas USA.


Precast Concrete Manufacturing Resources from the American Concrete Pipe Association

14 Reasons to Choose Concrete Pipe

Concrete Pipe Design Manual

Concrete Pipe Specifications


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Pipe Association

Article Review: "Concrete Pipe – Health and Safety  in Severe Weather Conditions"

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Apr 11, 2019 4:48:45 PM

After more than 175 years, concrete pipe continues to be a product of choice for specifiers, contractors, and design engineers.

Throughout its 111-year history, the American Concrete Pipe Association and its members have met the demands of infrastructure owners while improving the quality and performance of concrete drainage and collection systems through advancements in product design, plant production, and concrete mixes. Contemporary de-signs of production plants in automated and robotic facilities ensure quality of products, health and safety, especially built to overcome severe weather conditions.

Concrete Pipe Health & Safety

 

Article by Russell Tripp, P.E., President, American Concrete Pipe Association, USA, and published in CPI - Concrete Plant international May 2018. To read the entire article go to the introductory page at American Concrete Pipe Association's web site.

The U.S. has sustained 230 weather and climate disasters since 1980 where overall damages/costs reached or exceeded $1 billion (including Consumer Price Index adjustment to 2018). The total cost of these 230 events exceeded $1.5 trillion (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions). As of April 6, 2018, there have been 3 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion each across the United States. [1]  The California wildfires, which burned more than 9.8 million acres in 2017, destroyed over 15,000 homes and businesses, caused 44 deaths, and racked up a cost of $18 billion. [2] 

Following disaster events, news reports documented pipeline systems and culverts that were irreparably damaged. Failed thermoplastic or corrugated metal drainage systems, from the wild fires in California to the hurricane damage in Texas and Florida, were identified as the primary cause of many road failures.

Unlike concrete, thermoplastic pipes will melt and burn. Based on recent fires in California, damage to a thermoplastic drainage system has extended far beyond the damaged pipe itself to include sidewalks, roadway, gas/oil pipelines, drinking water systems and nearby structures. Thermoplastic pipe materials installed close to the surface or where there is an ex-posed pipeline inlet or outlet run the risk of being damaged or destroyed by fire regardless of the use of special end treatments. Fires in concrete pipeline systems generally don’t affect structural strength or flow capacity; the two fundamental requirements of a gravity pipeline drainage or collection system. The repair or replacement of infrastructure is incredibly expensive, and the community impacts include the interruption of service, localize flooding and damaged roadways that severely disrupt traffic based on damaged thermoplastic or metal pipelines found in, or adjacent to road rights of way. Thermoplastic pipe culvert failures have been documented recently where access by emergency service vehicles were blocked resulting in loss of property and more threats to health and safety.

Concrete Pipe Advantages
Before and after burn. Using the QR-Code you can see the ACPA Comparative Flammability Demonstration October 21, 2015 on www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoXuyWnaJm4

Concrete pipe production facilities produce one of the world’s most enduring products for storm drainage and sewage collection systems. The long-lasting performance of precast concrete pipe and box drainage systems is well documented in severe weather conditions. Compared to thermo-plastic drainage systems, concrete pipe has always been and will continue to be rigid, rugged, and resilient.

Russell Tripp, P.E., Clemson University alumnus, earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering in 1982. He spent the first 21 years of his professional career working in the natural gas industry. He then served three years in the PVC sheet pile industry and four years in the plastic drainage industry before joining the ACPA.


 

Precast Concrete Manufacturing Resources from the American Concrete Pipe Association

14 Reasons to Choose Concrete Pipe

Concrete Pipe Design Manual

Concrete Pipe Specifications


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Pipe Association

Quality Control and Testing of Concrete Pipe

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Apr 4, 2019 3:26:47 PM

The American Concrete Pipe Association is the spokesperson for the concrete pipe industry in all matters affecting the industry’s welfare.

We researched their content and found some great free resources. Their home page section on "Pipe & Box Resources" starts off with Design and "14 Reasons to Choose Concrete."

Precast Concrete Pipe Design Manual

"Concrete is the world’s most commonly used building material.

In its simplest form, concrete is a mixture of paste and aggregates. The material (paste) used to manufacture concrete pipe is composed principally of Portland cement and water, and is used to coat the surface of the fine and coarse aggregates. The Portland cement is a closely controlled chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other compounds, to which gypsum is added in the final grinding process to regulate the setting time of the concrete. Portland cement’s chemistry comes to life in the presence of water. Soon after the cement and water are combined, a chemical reaction called hydration occurs and the paste hardens and gains strength to form the rock-like mass known as concrete. During hydration, a node forms on the surface of each cement particle. The node grows and expands until it links up with nodes from other cement particles or adheres to adjacent aggregates. Within this process lies the key to the remarkable trait of concrete – it’s plastic and malleable when newly mixed and strong and durable when hardened. ..."

The 14th Reason is "Quality Control and Testing of Concrete Pipe."

Batching and mixing operations in the industry’s premier plants have been upgraded over the past 10 years. Characteristics of this operation of the pipe production process normally include:
• Computer controlled weighing and proportioning systems
• Computer controlled mixing systems
• Automated recording systems
• Absorption testing

Concrete PipePlant Certification

The American Concrete Pipe Association offers an on-going quality assurance program called the “Quality Cast” Plant Certification Program. (http://www.concrete-pipe.org/qcast.htm). This 124-point audit-inspection program covers the inspection of materials, finished products and handling/storage procedures, as well as performance testing and quality control documentation. Plants are certified to provide storm sewer and culvert pipe or under a combined sanitary sewer, storm sewer, and culvert pipe program.

Line Item 6.1 "Forms shall be kept clean of concrete build-up and inspected after each use."

Line Item 8.2. "Pre-Pour Visual Inspection"
For each pipe produced, visually inspect the following applicable items prior to pouring:
• Reinforcing Placement
• Handling Holes / Lifting Devices
• Tie-pin Holes
• Release Agent Application
• Form Cleanliness and Condition
• Step Holes / Plugs 

American Concrete Pipe Association

Brief History of the ACPA

The American Concrete Pipe Association was originally conceived in 1907 by a small group of concrete farm drain tile manufacturers as the Interstate Cement Tile Manufacturers Association in Ames, Iowa. The group needed some means of exchanging ideas and establishing a high quality, standardized products. In 1914, the organization was renamed the American Concrete Pipe Association. Throughout the 20th century, the concrete pipe industry has experienced tremendous growth. As more and more people moved from farms to cities, it created increased demand for concrete sewer and drainage products. The introduction of the automobile and subsequent highway development extended the uses of concrete pipe storm drains and culverts. There are currently over 400 plants operated by ACPA members in the United States and Canada. Over 40 countries are represented in the membership of the American Concrete Pipe Association. ACPA’s international headquarters are located in Irving, Texas USA.


Precast Concrete News from the American Concrete Pipe Association

2018 Camp Fire — Reminder of Need for Fire-Resilient Infrastructure

Reinforced Concrete Pipe Replaces 20-Year Old Plastic System in Florida

Become a member of ACPA by completing a membership application


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, American Concrete Pipe Association

Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute Design Awards 2017

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 28, 2019 9:11:36 PM

PCI recognizes groundbreaking work by owners, designers, builders, and precast concrete system manufactures across the country.

When we can't find new technical information on precast concrete release agents it's always a learning experience to look back at historically successful projects. These are from 2017.

Special Award Winners

 

The PCI Design Awards showcase the creative and innovate uses of precast and prestressed concrete in a wide variety of structures. The program demonstrates how designers are continuing to use high-performance precast, prestressed concrete to achieve sustainable, more cost-effective, aesthetically pleasing, and quickly-constructed projects.

 

Building Award Winners 

Transportation Award Winners

 

Honorable Mentions 

Higher Ground Saint Paul Higher Ground Saint Paul St. Paul MN  
Interstate 95 Interchange At SR-202 (JT Butler Boulevard) Interstate 95 Interchange At SR-202 (JT Butler Boulevard) Jacksonville FL  
Minnesota Senate Building Minnesota Senate Building St. Paul MN  
U.S. Bank Stadium U.S. Bank Stadium Minneapolis MN  

Read the host page at PCI.


About PCI
 
Founded in 1954, the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) is a technical institute for the precast concrete structures industry. PCI develops, maintains, and disseminates the body of knowledge for designing, fabricating, and constructing precast structures. PCI provides technical resources, certification for companies and individuals, continuing education, as well as conducts research and development projects, conventions, conferences, awards programs, and much more. PCI members include precast concrete manufacturers, companies that provide products and services to the industry, precast concrete erectors, and individual members such as architects, consultants, contractors, developers, educators, engineers, materials suppliers, service providers, and students. To learn more, visit www.pci.org, or email Tom Bagsarian at tbagsarian@pci.org.


Precast Concrete News from the Precast Concrete Institute

Bridge Geometry Manual and Training Webinars

Find a PCI Certified Plant

PCI Design Handbook, 8th Edition


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, Precast Concrete Institute

Article Review - Selecting and Using Form Release Agents

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 22, 2019 5:54:36 PM

Here are a few highlights of a great article by John A. Koski that was published in Concrete Construction Magazine

Enhance the quality and economy of precast products by using the right release agent

Almost every precaster has had a double tee or an architectural precast panel crack as it was being removed from a form. In some cases, an ineffective or improperly applied release agent may have been the culprit. At other times, the wrong type of release agent may have been used.

Highest quality precast concrete plant -2

Knowing how to properly use form release agents and which agent should be used for a particular application can go a long way toward preventing costly mistakes. In addition, following proper procedures and using the right agent can enhance the quality and economy of a finished precast piece.

When examining prices of comparable release agents, compare them based on their cost per square foot of coverage, not by the cost of a 5-gallon pail or 55-gallon drum. For example, two release agents may sell for the same price for a 55-gallon drum. However, one may have an estimated coverage rate of 800 square feet per gallon while the other can cover an estimated 1,100 square feet per gallon. If they are equal in performance and other attributes, than the one with the greater coverage rate is a better value.

Make sure that spray equipment is working properly. For example, a partially clogged spray nozzle can deliver a release agent in spits and spurts, allowing a too-heavy application in some areas and none in other places. Also, make sure that the spray tip is the right size for the product being applied. A tip that provides spray that is too fine or too heavy can create problems.

Biodegradable Concrete Form Release Agents 2 copy

Do not over-apply a release agent, especially when using a release agent that is chemically reactive. These release agents chemically react with the alkali in concrete to form a thin release film. Applying too much of the release agent can cause excessive surface dusting on the finished concrete.

Although these suggestions may help solve some of the problems pre-casters experience, if you continue to have problems with a release agent, call the manufacturer. Reputable manufacturers maintain technical-assistance departments designed to help solve problems and improve product quality. If a manufacturer can’t or won’t provide you with the answers or information you need in a timely fashion, consider switching to one who will.

Read the entire article here.


Precast Concrete News from Concrete Construction Magazine

Exploring the Value of BIM

Advanced Concrete Sustainability

Training Your Field Leaders

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, John Koski, Concrete Construction Magazine

Lightweight Precast Concrete Roof with Optimized Load-Bearing Design

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 14, 2019 3:56:33 PM

3D Sand printing for formwork manufacturing and showing oil based precast concrete form release agent application

Researchers at ETH Zurich have fabricated an 80 m2 light­weight concrete slab at the DFAB House, making it the world's first full-scale architectural project to use 3D sand printing for its formwork. Just 20 mm thick at its thinnest point, decoratively ribbed and not even half as heavy as a conventional concrete ceiling: with "Smart Slab", the name says it all. The slab combines the structural strength of concrete with the design freedom of 3D printing.

Developed by the research group of Benjamin Dillenburger, Assistant Professor for Digital Building Technologies at ETH Zurich, Smart Slab is one of the core elements of the residen­tial unit DFAB House at Empa's and Eawag's research and in­novation platform NEST in Dubendorf. The 80 m2, 15 t ceiling consists of eleven concrete segments and connects the lower floor with the two-story timber volume above.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 1

The Smart Slab segments being placed piece by piece on the 12 cm wide mesh mould wall.

(Thanks to CPI - Concrete Plant International May 2018)

Only as much concrete as needed

3D concrete printing is currently experiencing a boom in ar­chitecture, and entire houses have already been printed layer by layer. However, for the Smart Slab project, the researchers did not produce the building components themselves with 3D printing but rather the formwork - i.e. the mould. To achieve this, they used a large-scale 3D sand printer, which means the resulting moulds consist of a kind of artificial sand­stone. One of the advantages over the layered concrete print­ing process is that high performant fibre-reinforced concrete can be used and the structure can be fabricated in the preci­sion of millimeters.

Formwork production is the most labour-intensive step in con­crete construction, particularly for non-standardized compo­nents. Since concrete is relatively cheap and readily abundant, the temptation is for the construction industry to produce the same solid ceilings over and over again, but the disadvantage is excessive material consumption and implicitly, a big carbon footprint. Digital fabrication methods can make a key contri­bution here: components can be optimized, enabling the necessary stability with far less material. The geometric com­plexity of a component does not matter in 3D printing, nor does it cause any additional costs - the printer simply prints what it is told to.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 7

The 3D sand printer used for the fabrication of the form work. The printer has a build volume of 8 cubic meters and a reso­lution of a fraction of a millimeter.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 4

Post-processing of the 30 printed form work parts. Unconsol­idated sand particles are being removed from the print bed.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 6

The formwork parts are assembled seamlessly and prepared for concreting.

Computational design coordinates parameters

Dillenburger's research group developed a new software to fabricate the formwork elements, which is able to record and coordinate all parameters relevant to produc­tion. In addition to basic data such as room dimensions, the researchers also en­tered a scan of the curved wall, accurate down to the last millimeter, which acts as the main support for the concrete ceiling. With the software, one could adapt the geometry of the slab so that at each point it was applied only as thick as structurally necessary to support the force flow. "We didn't draw the slab; we programmed it," says Mania Aghaei Meibodi, Smart Slab project lead and senior researcher in Dil­lenburger's group. "It would not have been possible to coordinate all these aspects with analogue planning, particularly with such precision."

If you look at the ceiling from below, you see an organic ornamental structure with different hierarchies. The main ribs carry the loads, while the smaller filigree ribs are mainly used for architectural expression and acoustics. Statics and ornamentation go hand-in-hand. The lighting and sprinkler systems are also integrated into the slab structure. Their size and position were similarly coordinated with the planning software. In this way, the building technology disappears elegantly into the slab to occupy very little space. This saves only a few centimeters in the DFAB House proj­ect, but in high-rises this may mean a few extra floors could be fitted into the same height.

Fabrication at the push of a button

After planning on the computer is completed, the fabrication data can then be ex­ported to the machines at the push of a button. This is where several industry part­ners came into play for Smart Slab: one produced the high-resolution, 3D-printed sand formworks, which were divided into pallet-sized sections for printing and trans­port reasons, while another fabricated the timber formwork by means of CNC laser cutting. The latter gives shape to the upper part of the Smart Slab and leaves hollow areas that reduce material and weight and at the same time create space for electrical cables.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 3

An oil-based release agent facilitates the removal of the formwork once the concrete hardens.

The two types of formwork for the concreting were then brought together by a third company, which first sprayed the fibre-reinforced concrete onto the sand formwork to produce the finely ribbed surface of the lower concrete shell and then casted the remaining concrete into the timber formwork.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 2

Glass-fibre reinforced concrete being sprayed on the 3D printed formwork in several consecutive layers.

Strong thanks to prestressing

After a two-week hardening process, the eleven individual concrete segments were ready for transport to the NEST. Thanks to the precise planning and prefabrication, the installation time at the construction site was reduced to a minimum: a crane hoisted the concrete elements onto the load-bearing wall, where the prestressing took place. Workers pulled steel cables lengthwise and crosswise through the concrete sup­port and into the channels already inserted in the formwork. Tensioning the cables massively increases the system's load capacity.

3D Precast Concrete Forms Release Agent 5

The hierarchical grid of structural ribs of the Smart Slab.

"It was spectacular to see on the construction site how seam­lessly our elements fitted with each other and with the existing components of the DFAB House," says Dillenburger. "We owe this in part to the outstanding interdisciplinary collaboration with our partners. The meticulous work that we had invested into planning completely paid off."

Smart Slab partners

ETH Zurich research groups: Chair for Digital Build­ing Technologies, Benjamin Dillenburger (lead); Chair for Building Materials, Robert Flatt; Chair of Structural Design, Joseph Schwartz

Industry partners: Burgin Creations; Frutiger AG; voxeljet AG; Georg Ackermann GmbH; Stahlton AG; Christenguss AG; Fischer Rista AG; Rudolf Glauser AG; Gorn International AG

See here a video about "Smart Slab."


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Form Release, Concrete Plant International Magazine

The Precast Show 2020 Fort Worth, Texas

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Mar 8, 2019 4:31:48 PM

Thanks to everyone who came to The Precast Show 2019 in Louisville, Ky.

The Precast Show is the largest precast-specific trade show in North America and the one place where you can find the industry’s most important suppliers and foremost equipment experts under one roof. We are looking forward to seeing you March 5-7, 2020, in Fort Worth, Tex.

Precast Show 2019 in Louisville, Ky 1b

Precast Show 2019 in Louisville, Ky 2b

Thanks to Angela Cox for posting these on LinkedIn last week during the show.

We showcased our extensive product line

  • Concrete Form Release Agents
  • Rust Inhibitors
  • Spraying Equipment
  • Seasoning Agents
  • Concrete Dissolver's

Product Categories

  • Coatings
  • Lubricants
  • Other Chemicals
  • Release Agents
  • Rust Preventive Chemicals
  • Sealants
  • Sprayers

The Precast Show is sponsored by the National Precast Concrete Association and the Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute with additional collaboration from the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute and the Cast Stone Institute.

Our directory ad.

20181102 HG_1-2pgH_TPR-GS copy

The Perfect Release

Grifcote® and Cast-O-Magic® Concrete Form Release Agents
VOC Compliant, NSF Certified and Biodegradable Release Agents for All Concrete Applications 

Industry Leading Performance and Quality

Trained technicians are available to visit your site, determine your needs and design the right product for you.

  • Grifcote FR-50 & PR-5S VOC - Workhorse Release
  • Grifcote LV-50 Plus - NSF Certified for Potable Water Release
  • Grifcote Bio-Gold - Environmentally Friendly Release 
  • Grifcote CC-150 VOC - Premium Seasoning Agent
  • Cast-O-Magic, Con-Solver and Liquid Chisel
  • Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel Forms

Nationwide and International Distribution


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands-on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water and non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable releases, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products 

Tags: Concrete Form Release Agents, Concrete Release Agents, Concrete Forms, Concrete Casting Supplies, Precast Show, Concrete Form Release

Subscribe to Concrete News

Concrete Posts

Concrete Casting News Categories

see all