<img alt="" src="https://secure.hims1nice.com/150891.png" style="display:none;">

Concrete Casting News from the Hill and Griffith Company

Safety Data Sheet Regulations for Concrete Form Releases

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Nov 10, 2016 12:55:12 PM

(This article is one of the most popular in our Concrete Casting News. We've updated it and reposted it today. Enjoy!)

The New Globally Harmonized System: The Right to Know

Are you or your employees at risk?

By Bob Waterloo, published in the March/April 2014 issue of PRECAST INC.

New rules, new regulations for concrete form releases. It seems that we are faced with these on an almost daily basis. If you are not up to date, you and your employees could be at risk, and your company could be facing penalties. The United States, in conjunction with other nations, has agreed to new rules regarding employee rights and need to know concerning hazardous materials (previously covered in Material Safety Data Sheets, or MSDSs). The new reference will be called Safety Data Sheets (SDSs).

 

We use many materials in the precast industry, and many of them have given us better castings – but always at a price. That price often comes in the form of special care and handling of materials that are classified as hazardous, including those that are considered flammable or combustible, or cause irritation, sensitivity, corrosion, and are proven or suspected carcinogens. Part of our responsibility is to help reduce the threat, whether minor or serious, to our workers and the environment. OSHA commonly refers to it as “the right to know.”

You are probably already aware of the new rules and regulations regarding SDSs and the training necessary to comply with the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS). This applies not just to precast suppliers, but the precast producer is also responsible for complying with certain regulations including training.

GHS Label Elements

In making a brief survey of precast and pipe producers, I found that while they are generally somewhat aware, most do not realize the full scope of the new regulations. Here is a quick overview of the GHS.

First, the MSDS is a thing of the past. It is now being replaced by the SDS, and while the format is very similar, there are some significant changes. You will need to have SDSs from all of your suppliers. Some states will have additional requirements, although they are not necessarily addressed here. 

June 1, 2015, is the time for everything to be in place. An additional review of the policies will occur June 1, 2016, after which there may be additional changes. However, some of the laws are already in effect. If you are not in compliance with them yet, you will need to move quickly. 

The Employer is responsible for:  

  • Identifying and maintaining a list of hazardous chemicals known to be present at the plant

  • Obtaining, keeping up to date and providing employee access to SDSs

  • Being sure that all hazardous materials are properly labeled

  • Presenting a training program for all employees who will be exposed to these hazardous materials

  • Having a written hazardous communication program in place

  • Having SDS information available to employees and ensuring they have access to the company training program

  • Ensuring that employees read and understand the SDSs and the label on the containers of all hazardous material

Perhaps the first area of concern to producers is the fact that employee training of the new GHS was to be completed by Dec. 1, 2013. If you haven’t already done so, now is the time to do it. 

Your training program must include:

  • The requirements of the standard

  • Places where hazardous chemicals are present in your work area

  • The location and availability of the written program, the chemical inventory and the SDSs

  • How to access the SDSs in your work area

  • How to read the SDSs

  • How to read the GHS-style container labels

  • Any specific labeling used in-house if different from the standards

  • Specific hazardous chemicals in the employees’ immediate work areas

  • How to detect the presence of a release of a hazardous chemical

  • The physical and health hazards of those chemicals

  • Measures you can use to protect yourself against these hazards

  • Required personal protective equipment (PPE) available and how to use it 

Next, you must have a written program and a list of all SDSs spelled out in the program. All SDSs must be in English (worldwide), and additional languages also must be available to convey to employees in their native language or a language they understand. The manufacturer of the hazardous material is responsible only for supplying the SDS in English, so you are responsible for any additional languages.

Materials that fall under the GHS include: 

  • Health hazards

  • Physical hazards

  • Environmental hazards 

  • Hazards not other classified

  • Other hazardous chemical 

Hazard Warning Levels

Any material falling under the “hazardous” classification must have the following information on the label:

• Product identification
• Pictogram
• Signal word
• Hazard statement(s)
• Precautionary statement(s)
• Name, address and telephone number of the chemical 
manufacturer, importer or other              responsible party 

Hazard Warning Labels

While there is no specific format for the label, all of the above must be clearly shown. Pictograms are also required for quick identification of the hazard. On the SDS itself, there will now be a total of 16 sections – all of which must be completed for any material that falls under the hazardous classification: 

1. Identification

2. Hazard(s)identification

3. Composition/information on ingredients

4. First-aid measures

5. Firefighting measures

6. Accidental release measures

7. Handling and storage

8. Exposure controls/personal protection

9. Physical and chemical properties

10. Stability and reactivity

11. Toxicological information

12. Ecological information

13. Disposal considerations

14. Transport information

15. Regulatory information

16. Other information (including date of preparation or last revision) 

As a final note, all hazardous materials in your workplace must be cross-referenced by supplier and/or manufacturer.

These new OSHA regulations place an additional burden not only on the manufacturer/distributor, but also on the end user– you! Owners and operators are now responsible for keeping employees aware of any hazardous material on the premises, and all new employees must go through this training before being allowed in the workplace. OSHA will likely ask about the GHS in your workplace and assess stiff fines for not being in compliance.

The National Precast Concrete Association offers its members a free webinar titled “Webinar: Guide to Globally Harmonized System Documentation” by logging on to precast.org/ education.
Concrete Form Release SDS paper 3-14 

Bob Waterloo is Technical Sales Manager, Concrete Release Agents, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Cincinnati. For additional information, contact him at bwaterloo@hillandgriffith.com

The online Precast Inc. magazine article is available at: precast.org/2014/03/new-globally-harmonized-system-right-know/.

For a PDF of this article, click here or on the image.


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Precast Concrete Safety, Concrete Form Release

Superplasticizer and Concrete Form Release Agents Interactions

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Oct 27, 2016 5:01:03 PM

This week's post is a review of a technical paper published by "Materials Sciences and Applications" June 2012, titled "Interactions between Superplasticizer and Release Agents at the Concrete/Formwork Interface" by Samir Bouharoun, Yannick Vanhove, Chafika Djelal, Pascale De Caro, Isabelle Dubois.

Abstract 

The efficiency of superplasticizer depends on the quantity of fines, on the quantity of soap formed and so, on the release agent formulation.

Introduction

The use of superplasticizer ensures that the concrete is fluid enough for easy placement in formworks.

Concrete-Form-Release-Superplasticizer copy.jpg

Characteristics of the Materials

Concrete: Two concretes were formulated from an ordinary concrete with different dosages of superplasticizer.

Release Agents: The two release agents selected for this study belong to the two families of oils on the market: one of petrochemical origin, and one of vegetable origin.

Effect of Concrete Formulation on Release Agent behavior

With vegetable-based oil, the interface is organized in two levels: 

  • The soap film superposed on the oil film
  • The layer formed by the soap-oil emulsion

This organization proves to be particularly effective in reducing friction and hydrophobing the wall formwork. Although the superplasticizer interacted less with the mineral oil than with the vegetable oil, its role is equally important in the case of the mineral oil. The superplasticizer stabilizes the interstitial emulsion, which is less rich in soap, thus having a protective effect on the wall formwork that is characteristic of the mode of action of a mineral oil.

Conclusions

Vegetable-based oil retains an advantage over mineral oil, thanks to the double-layer soap-oil organization. The friction of the fresh concrete against the formwork is so reduced more substantially.

Consequently, the performances of superplasticizer depend on the quantity of fines and on the quantity of soap formed. This is why, in order to optimize lubrication performance, the superplasticizer addition rate must be dictated by these two parameters. 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Precast Concrete Safety, Concrete Form Release

Precast Concrete Double-Tee Beam - Concrete Release Agent Application

Posted by Hill and Griffith Company on Oct 21, 2016 3:23:21 PM

This week's video is about manufacturing a Double-Tee prestressed precast concrete beam.

From Wikipedia, "A double tee or double-T beam is a load-bearing structure that resembles two T-beams connected to each other side by side. The strong bond of the flange (horizontal section) and the two webs (vertical members, also known as stems) creates a structure that is capable of withstanding high loads while having a long span. The typical sizes of double tees are up to 15 feet (4.6 m) for flange width, up to 5 feet (1.5 m) for web depth, and up to 80 feet (24 m) or more for span length. Double tees are pre-manufactured from prestressed concrete which allows construction time to be shorten."

Concrete-Form-Release-application-Double-T.jpg

Image shows the application of concrete form release agent to the Double-Tee form.

 


Hill and Griffith Customer Service

We're known for our hands on approach. Let us visit your plant and recommend concrete release agents, packerhead concrete form releases, concrete form seasoning, potable water concrete form release, non-petroleum concrete form release, biodegradable concrete form release, rust inhibitors and concrete dissolver products that suit your needs.

Hill and Griffith Samples

Product Samples

We are pleased to provide samples in quantities large enough to allow you to "try before you buy."
Contact Us »

 

Hill and Griffith Customer Service

Technical Services & Support

On-site casting defect investigations, product testing, machine start-ups and much more. Also, lab facilities are available to provide testing upon request.
Contact Us »

 

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

 

Tags: Concrete, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Precast Concrete Safety, Concrete Form Release

Don't Jump to Any Rash Conclusions - Precast Concrete Safety

Posted by Myke Amend on Sep 20, 2016 3:16:00 PM

precast safety article image: Don't jump to any rash conclusions

Understand what causes rashes in the concrete industry and how to prevent them.

-by Bob Waterloo

Think about summer in a concrete precast or pipe operation. The weather turns warm, the workflow quickens and all of a sudden there is an increase of rashes among some of your production workers. Coincidence? Perhaps not. Rashes are a fairly familiar occurrence in the precast concrete industry and there are many potential causes.

It is easy to see why rashes occur more frequently when the weather turns warm. With warmer weather, we start to sweat. Long sleeve shirts come off in favor of cooler clothing, exposing more skin. Sweat acts as a magnet for anything airborne, and, as we know, precast operations can generate a lot of dust. Some of those airborne particulates may include concrete and/or cement dust that naturally ends up on our skin. This is often how rashes occur.

There are a number of materials in a precast plant that could cause rashes, such as cleaning chemicals, curing compounds, sealant, fly ash and other concrete mix additives. Safety data sheets for all materials should be kept up to date and new employee orientation should include stressing the importance of being aware of the materials and chemicals they are working with and how to avoid unsafe contact. While just about any type of chemical can cause a reaction, in the precast industry cement burns are also often an issue when cement and wet concrete are handled improperly. (See “Preventing Cement Burns” in the Jan-Feb 2016 issue of Precast Inc. to learn more.)

What About Form Release?

There is a common misperception that form release agents cause rashes too, but that is not necessarily true and may come from a time when form releases were quite different. Prior to 1999, the most common carrying agents in form releases were diesel, kerosene and fuel oil. Improper handling of those old-style form releases could have caused rashes.

That all changed with the passage of Volatile Organic Compounds regulations in September 1999. In response to the regulations, form oil composition changed. Today, most carrying agents in form release agents are now mineral (seal) oils. While these new compounds could cause skin reactions if left uncleaned or unattended over an extended period of time, the risk would be considered minimal compared with other products used in the precast and pipe industries. Modern form release products are much more environmentally friendly and as a result they pose less of a problem when exposed to skin.

How to Avoid the Rash

As with many environmental issues at the plant, continuous education of employees is the key to keeping rashes at bay. The NPCA Safety, Health and Enviornmental Committee recently developed training materials available at precast.org that can be incorporated into precast concrete safety training and toolbox talks.

Visit precast.org and type “skin protection” into the search box near the top of the page for links to two new SHE Committee publications on the topic.

In talking with managers at a number of larger precast plants, the consensus was that that cement, cement dust and concrete were the primary causes of rashes in the workplace. In all cases, personal hygiene, including regular changes of clothing worn at work and the washing of exposed areas of skin, were considered to be the most important steps to avoiding skin problems.

OSHA considers contact dermatitis an occupational illness and states that any skin disorders lasting beyond 48 hours should be recorded with a separate entry on the OSHA 200 form.

10 Ways to Help Protect Employees from Skin Rashes:

  1. Continually stress the importance of personal hygiene. Frequent washing of exposed areas should be done regularly during the day. Washing of hands should be done before putting on gloves and after taking them off.
  2. Constantly remind production staff that they are working with chemicals and that certain precautions must always be taken when working with portland cement.
  3. Concrete and cement dust will permeate clothing. A daily change of clothing should be a regular habit. Clothes should be changed at work so as to not introduce cement residue into the car or home.
  4. Employees will often use plant air to blow the dust off their clothes. It will clear off the surface dust but the compressed air will also “push” some of the dust through the clothing, making more skin contact inevitable.
  5. Use protective clothing, especially gloves, whenever possible.
  6. Dry exposed skin thoroughly after washing.
  7. The use of moisturizing creams will keep hands and skin supple.
  8. Remove any wet cement from clothing.
  9. Don’t wear jewelry at work.
  10. Employees should be instructed to let their supervisor know immediately if they are experiencing a skin issue. Any persistent skin problem should be reported to a physician.

Bob Waterloo is technical sales manager, Concrete Release Agents, Hill and Griffith Co., based in Indianapolis.

Bulletins and Technical Papers for Concrete Casting Products

Tags: Concrete, Concrete Casting Supplies, Concrete Casting Products, Concrete Casting, Concrete Safety, Precast Concrete, Precast Concrete Safety, Concrete Form Release

Subscribe to Concrete News

Concrete Posts

Concrete Casting News Categories

see all